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FULL-TIME UNDERGRADUATE CALENDAR 2005-2006

HOME » COURSES » Psychology

Psychology


PSY 102PSY 105PSY 108PSY 124PSY 202PSY 209
PSY 214PSY 215PSY 217PSY 300PSY 302PSY 304
PSY 308PSY 324PSY 325PSY 335PSY 402PSY 434
PSY 504PSY 505PSY 544PSY 602PSY 604PSY 605
PSY 606PSY 607PSY 614PSY 615PSY 620PSY 621
PSY 654PSY 706PSY 707PSY 711PSY 713PSY 714
PSY 802PSY 805PSY 806PSY 807PSY 808PSY 813
PSY 814PSY 920PSY 940PSY 941

PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
This course introduces students to psychology, the scientific study of behaviour and cognition, by examining the basic principles of psychology and their applications to everyday experience. The course will survey various areas of psychology including biological bases of behaviour, learning, memory, thinking, personality, abnormal and social psychology. (PR)
Antirequisites: PSY 11A/B, PSY 11, PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 105 Perspectives in Psychology
This course introduces psychology by exploring several frameworks, such as the biological, behaviourist/learning, cognitive, and psychodynamic. The emphasis is on examining the ways in which the various perspectives have influenced our understanding of how people act, think, and feel, and the contributions that each has made to psychology as a discipline. (LL)
Antirequisite: PSY 102.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 108 Applied Problem Solving
This course offers a general introduction to issues associated with effective thinking and problem solving. The focus is on procedures for identifying and solving problems, the role of memory in thinking, and methods of making decisions. Factors which affect thinking and problem solving, such as errors in evaluating experience and the nature of creation, are also considered. (PR)
Antirequisite: PSY 308.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 124 Social Psychology
In this course, students examine the influence of social variables on the behaviour of the individual. Topics include affiliation, aggression, prejudice, social cognition, the development and measurement of attitudes, persuasion, socialization, conformity and mass behaviour. These topics are explored from a cross-cultural as well as a North American perspective. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisites: PSY 504, PSY 24.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
This course continues the introduction to psychology from PSY 102, with a focus on applying psychological principles in different contexts. The course will survey various fields of psychology, including development over the life span, personality, behaviour in a social context, and psychological disorders. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 102 or Direct Entry.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 209 Industrial Psychology
In this course, psychology is applied to history and problems of work, personnel selection and individual differences; training and evaluation; the role of motivation; and the structure, process and dynamics of organization. (PR)
Antirequisite: PSY 204.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 214 Psychopharmacology
This course will examine a variety of issues surrounding the use, mechanisms, and actions of psychoactive or mind-altering drugs. The course will focus on two main contextual topic areas: drug addiction, and drug treatment of mental illness. Each of these areas will be explored in depth, including the role of genes, biochemistry, cognition (feelings and thoughts), and personality factors. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisite: PSY 607.
Lect: 3 hrs
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PSY 215 Psychology of Addictions
This course is designed to introduce students to basic principles and issues in the area of addiction; the factors that influence its development, and the treatments used to manage it. Students will learn the similarities and differences between addictive disorders and other forms of psychopathology. Both experimental and clinical approaches to addiction will be discussed and illustrated with research from each of these domains. Students will become familiar with the tools used by addiction researchers and clinicians and will learn about the strengths and weakness of the various instruments and methodologies. (PR)
Prerequisites: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 217 Environmental Psychology
This course provides an introduction to the concept of people-environment relations. It examines the effects and power of the everyday environment and the research strategies used to study these effects. Examples include: the effects of noise, pollution, and weather on behaviour, personal space and territoriality, and crowding and behaviour. (PR)
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 300 Psychology and Law
Psychology's empirical perspective sometimes complements the legal system's rule-based nature, and sometimes the two disciplines are at odds. This course focuses on the application of psychological theory, methods, and data to various procedures and issues in the legal system, including eyewitness evidence, the detection of deception, jury selection and jury decision-making, and sentencing. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 302 Child Development
Students will be introduced to the methods, theories, findings and practical applications of child development. The focus is on describing the significant changes in physical, cognitive, social and emotional development and on explaining why these changes occur. There is an emphasis on the immediate contextual influences of families, peer groups, and schools as well as on the broader contextual influences of subculture, culture, and historical era. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 304 Psychology of Gender
This course involves an examination and critique of psychological theory and research related to gender. Broad topics to be addressed include: gender development, stereotyping and gender roles, sexism, and the impact of gender on intimate relationships, achievement, and psychological and physical health. A key goal of the course is to foster an appreciation for how gender may be relevant to students’ working and personal lives. (LL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 308 Psychology of Thinking
Thought is central to our functioning in coping with both the physical and the social environment. In this course the student will study the basis of human cognitive processes such as problem-solving, decision-making and planning. Research and theories of how individual and social factors affect the efficiency of these processes will be examined, and the consequences of poor thinking processes for the individual and for society will be considered. (LL)
Antirequisite: PSY 108.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 324 Biological Psychology
This course is concerned with integrating the understanding of human behaviour and the understanding of physiological mechanisms relating to behaviour, particularly those of the nervous system and brain. Students are introduced to neurons and neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and the methods used in physiological research. These core areas allow students to understand how nervous system mechanisms contribute to sensorimotor function, ingestion, sexual behavior, memory, thought, language and consciousness, addictions and psychological disorders. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 325 Behavioural Disorders
This course examines conceptions of abnormalcy, how behavioural disorders are classified, and how they are treated. The DSM classification system and alternative systems will be critically considered, and the causes of behavioural disorders will be discussed from a variety of perspectives (e.g., behaviourist, humanist, sociocultural). Specific disorders to be discussed include mood disorders, schizophrenia, substance-related disorders, somatoform and dissociative disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, and anxiety disorders. In addition, the course will include consideration of cross-cultural factors, and legal and ethical issues. (Equivalent to the first half of PSY 040) (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisite: PSY 606.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 335 Clinical Psychology
This survey course will examine a range of issues related to the field of clinical psychology. Clinical psychology concerns the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of individuals who experience social, emotional, behavioural, and mental health problems. Topics covered include the history of clinical psychology, professional and ethical issues, assessment and diagnosis of mental health problems, modalities of treatment (e.g., individual, group, family), therapeutic orientations and their methods and techniques, and current issues. There will be a focus throughout on theory, research, and practice. (Equivalent to the second half of PSY 040) (PR)
Prerequisites: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 105 or (PSY 102 and PSY 325).
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 402 Adult Development
All of us hold beliefs about what it means to be an adult and what it means to grow old. In this course, students examine their beliefs in light of scientific evidence on adult development and aging. Theories and empirical findings related to changes in physical, cognitive, personality, and social processes are examined. Contextual influences of family, culture, and historical era are emphasized. A recurrent theme is the tremendous diversity and individual variability in aging. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 105 or PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102. Antirequisites: PSY 22A/B, PSY 22.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 434 Brain & Behaviour
This course builds on the foundational content covered in PSY 324 and explores current concepts and debates surrounding the study of the human brain by looking at functional neuroanatomy as revealed in the developing brain and in disorders of the brain. Topics discussed include sensory-perceptual functions, memory and consciousness, developmental disorders, tumors and traumatic head injury, and degenerative diseases. (PR)
Prerequisites: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY105 or (PSY 102 and PSY 324).
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 504 Social Psychology
Social Psychology is an extremely diverse field that generally deals with people in social situations. Core topics include social behaviour such as aggression, obedience, conformity, intimate relationships, and how groups function. They also include attitudes, social cognition, social perception, prejudice and feelings of guilt, all of which are assumed to affect social behaviour. Basic methodological issues will be discussed as they pertain to the above topics. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisite: PSY 124.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 505 Personality Theory
At present, a number of major perspectives co-exist as alternative approaches to the understanding of personality. Theorists representative of each will be discussed in detail. This course is equivalent to the first half of PSY 036. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 544 Evolutionary Psychology
This course explores human behaviour from the context of the Biology, Genetics, and the evolutionary forces that have shaped human behaviour from its earliest origins. The topics discussed include evolutionary theory, sexual and gender differences, family influences on development, group dynamics, co-operation and human conflict, and forensic Psychology. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 602 Developmental Psychopathology
This course examines psychological disorders in children and adolescents, taking into account the developmental context in which such disorders occur. Topics may include classification and assessment, anxiety disorders, depression, conduct disorders, attention deficit disorder, autism, schizophrenia, and eating disorders. (PR)
Prerequisites: PSY 302 and (PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PST 105) or Direct Entry. Antirequisite: PSY 32A/B, PSY 32.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 604 Issues in Psychology
This course involves an in-depth examination of a specific area in psychology. Topics vary from year to year and have included the psychology of aging, and the causes of aggression and criminal behaviour. Students may contact the department to enquire about the current subject matter. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 605 Psychology of Health and Health Care
This course will offer insight into the psychological influences on health, with an emphasis on the application of psychological principles to health care delivery and disease prevention. Among the topics discussed are general health promotion, patient-practitioner interaction, stress, pain, and psychological issues in chronic and life-threatening illness. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105 or Direct Entry.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 606 Abnormal Psychology
Clinical syndromes ranging from the mild patterns of personality pathology to the more severe disorders will be discussed. In addition, the techniques involved in psychodiagnosis and the types of therapy available will be examined. This course is equivalent to the second half of PSY 036. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisite: PSY 325.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 607 Drugs and Human Behaviour
This course introduces students to the social, psychological and biological factors involved in the use and effects of psychoactive drugs and drug-taking behaviour. The course examines two aspects of drug use: addiction, and the drug treatment of mental disorders, and addresses current issues such as the use of designer and performance-enhancing drugs. Topics range from historical, social, and cultural aspects of psychoactive drug use, to neurobiology and pharmacology underlying drugs and drug use. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisite: PSY 214.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 614 Psychology of Sport
This course aims to examine sport by focusing on the application of psychological theory and research to many of its aspects. Topics in this area include personality and the athlete, attention, anxiety and arousal, motivation and self confidence, social psychology of sport, psychobiology of sport and exercise, and intervention strategies. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 615 The Psychology of Belief and Skepticism
This course takes a critical look at things people are willing to believe, and the psychological processes behind that belief. Basic belief (or “credulity”) factors such as humans’ information and cultural contexts, and source credibility are discussed. Many beliefs are discussed, including some alleged professional techniques such as therapeutic touch, subliminal persuasion, and hypnotic interviews in the treatment of illness, in business, and in the justice system, respectively. (UL)
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 620 Psychology of Immigration
In this course we will examine the issue of immigration from the perspective of experiences of immigrants and receiving societies. Broad topics to be addressed include: (i) immigration trends and societal effects, (ii) acculturation, ethnic identity, and cultural conflict, (iii) causes, forms, and experiences of prejudice and discrimination against immigrants, and (iv) strategies for promoting acceptance of diversity (e.g., multiculturalism). Throughout, the Canadian context of immigration will be emphasized. (UL)
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 621 Psychology of Human Sexuality
This course examines contemporary knowledge and attitudes towards human sexuality. Multiple perspectives will be presented, including psychosocial, cross-cultural and psychobiological. Sexuality across the life span will be examined, including issues pertaining to: biological sexual differentiation, intimacy and communication, gender role development, varieties of sexual relationships and behaviour, contraception, procreative technologies, and sexually transmitted diseases and HIV. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 654 Cognitive Psychology
This course explores the underlying structure and function of human memory in the context of the Psychology of thinking. In particular, students will examine how memory and information-processing help us understand how humans solve problems, plan, and make decisions. Topics discussed take a strong applied perspective and include theories of cognition, creativity, social influence, imagery and motivation, and effective strategies for problem-solving. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 706 Models of Personal Growth
This course focuses on recognizing and realizing one’s potential for growth. Eastern concepts drawn from areas such as Zen Buddhism, Yoga and Hinduism, and Western concepts from areas such as Gestalt therapy, Jungian psychoanalysis and existential psychology will be considered. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 707 Models of Stress and Adaptation
Every society produces stressors to which the members of that society must respond. In our society stress is commonplace, but the origins, effects and handling of stress are often poorly understood. Through the examination of psychological models of stress, this course seeks to make students aware of the stressors present in our society and of their own personal resources for adjustment and growth. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisite: PSY 805.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 711 Research Methods
This is a course in research in the social and health sciences, introducing students to computer manipulation and handling of databases as well as qualitative and quantitative research concepts. Students will be taught to use a major social science research package for data entry and complex analyses. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 601.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 713 Psychology of Perception
The focus of this course is processing information through the five senses. The approach is traditional, beginning with historical and methodological considerations and proceeding with a study of various visual phenomena, such as the perception of patterns, colour, depth, motion and illusions. The emphasis is on presenting the latest findings and the theories, models and systems created to understand them. (UL)
Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or (PSY 102 and PSY 601). Antirequisite: PSY 714.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 714 Visual Information Processing
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the latest findings and theories about how we organize and understand visual information. Knowledge about visual processing contributes immensely to the creative efforts of visual artists by providing them with information and perspectives on how we comprehend pattern, shape, brightness, colour, distance, size, motion, and illusions. (PR)
Antirequisite: PSY 713.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 802 Death, Dying and Bereavement
This course presents a comprehensive review and critical analysis of empirical findings on death, dying and bereavement. There will be a discussion of research-based techniques for dealing with the problems and stresses encountered in helping the dying or grieving person to adjust. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105 or Direct Entry.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 805 Adjustment, Stress and Coping
This course will offer insight into stress, its consequences, and what individuals can do to cope. There is a balance of theory and applied information, and although we will concentrate on psychological variables, physiological issues are also considered. Among the topics discussed: popular models of stress, sources of stress, the influence of cognitions and personality on one’s appraisal process, and strategies for successful stress management. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105 or Direct Entry. Antirequisite: PSY 707.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 806 Behaviour Modification
This course is designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of behaviour theory and a set of skills essential to the behaviour modification process. Course requirements include completion of a project in which students design and implement a programme to modify some aspect of their own behaviour (e.g., smoking, over-eating, coping with interpersonal conflict). (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105 or Direct Entry. Antirequisite: PSY 206.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 807 Psychology of Prejudice
This course involves an examination and critique of psychological theory and research related to prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup relations. Broad topics to be addressed include: the causes of prejudice, contemporary manifestations of prejudice and discrimination, experiences of the targets of prejudice, and approaches to reducing prejudice and group inequality. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 808 Community Psychology
In general, community psychology is concerned with the application of psychological principles to social issues such as child abuse, homelessness, school violence, racism, crime, and chemical dependency. This course will examine a number of topics related to community psychology including theories of community psychology, research methods, community mental health, prevention programs, the community practitioner as social change agent, and applications of community psychology to other settings and situations. (PR)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105 or Direct Entry.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 813 Psychology of Art and Creativity
We are both creators and perceivers of works of art. The psychology of creativity is concerned with the perceptual, cognitive, motivational, educational and cultural factors involved in original achievement. The psychology of aesthetics examines factors that produce judgments of artistic productions as ugly or beautiful, interesting or uninteresting, simple or complex. (UL)
Prerequisite: PSY 11A/B or PSY 11 or PSY 102 or PSY 105. Antirequisite: PSY 814.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 814 Principles of Aesthetic Production
Aesthetic production involves both a creator and a product, and this course examines the dynamics of each. Students are introduced to personal and cultural forces that shape creative production and to the universal aesthetic principles that govern audience responses to aesthetic products. (PR)
Antirequisite: PSY 813.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 920 Pathology and Science of the Mind
This course examines the development of psychology, psychiatry, and related disciplines from the Industrial Revolution to the present. The course traces changing conceptions of “insanity”, from demonic possession to mental disorders and abnormal behavior. Particular consideration will be given to treatment and theories related to psychoanalysis, behavioral psychology, and psychopharmacology, with a focus on the ways in which the “medical model” and drug treatments have influenced both research and public attitudes. (PR)
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 940 Prejudice and Discrimination
This course examines the origins and forms of prejudice and discrimination, the experiences of privilege and disadvantage, and strategies to reduce prejudice and discrimination. Throughout, the link between psychological processes and the social structure will be emphasized. A short placement in a community agency that is attempting to combat prejudice and/or discrimination will be included. Students will be required to participate in the agency’s efforts and to write a critical paper based on the experience. (PR)
Antirequisite: PSY 807.
Lect: 3 hrs.
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PSY 941 Cross Cultural Psychology
Cross‑cultural psychology is the critical and comparative study of cultural effects on human psychology. This course examines the linkages between cultural norms and behaviour, and the ways in which particular human activities are influenced by different, sometimes dissimilar, social and cultural forces. Topics covered will include motivation, development, emotion, social perception and social interaction. Some applied aspects of cross‑cultural psychology, such as prejudice and acculturative stress, will also be discussed. (PR)
Lect: 3 hrs.
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