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2007-2008 FULL- AND PART-TIME UNDERGRADUATE CALENDAR
HOME COURSES Politics and Public Administration

Politics and Public Administration
POG 100 Introduction to Governance
The term "governance" has become one of the most widely used in debates in the social sciences. Governance, unlike the much narrower term "government," includes the whole range of institutions and relations involved in the process of governing society. This course explores the roles of governments, private and non-profit/voluntary/ NGO sectors in terms of the capacity of state and non-state actors to manage the economic and social spheres at a time when this very capacity is challenged by the dispersion of power to international markets and institutions as well as sub-national actors and institutions. The course also explores alternative understandings and practices of governance. Consequently problems and issues associated with democracy and globalization are embedded in a much more complex governance regime than in the past.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 110 Canadian Politics
Against a backdrop of political culture and ideology, this course will examine citizen participation in Canadian democracy through parliamentary and extra-parliamentary mechanisms. In particular, the course introduces the central components of the contemporary Canadian political system most visible to citizens: political parties, elections, the media and polling, and pressure/interest groups. (Formerly POL 402)
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Antirequisites: POL 27A/B, POL 27
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 210 Canadian Government
This course explores the structure and processes of Canadian government, and citizen participation therein. Students will acquire an understanding of federalism and of key governmental institutions including the Constitution and Charter of Rights and Freedoms; the Executive, Legislative, Administrative and Judicial branches of government; and party government. The course will also examine citizen participation in Canadian democracy through parliamentary and extra-parliamentary mechanisms.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 110, Antirequisites: POL 27A/B, POL 27, POL 220
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 225 Global Governance
This course will introduce students to the emerging institutions and practices of global governance, how they are reconfiguring the relative powers and sovereignty of nation states and how they are being contested by critical social movements. These institutions and practices include: the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank (WB), World Trade Organization (WTO), free trade agreements, and the US-led war against terrorism. The course will focus on political and economic restructuring in the post-Cold War period but will situate contemporary developments against the history of the post WWII period and its modes of global governance.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 100 or POL 27A/B or POL 27
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 230 Research and Statistics
This is a one-semester course with a format of two one-hour lectures and a one-hour lab per week. No familiarity with the fundamental elements of research or statistics is assumed. The course gives politics students the practical methods needed to statistically describe and analyze phenomena and to present those results. Emphasis throughout the course is on practical uses and application of these techniques, rather than on their mathematical derivations. (Formerly PPA 524)
Lect: 2 hrs./Lab: 1 hr.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 310 Ontario Politics
This course will examine the main elements of provincial governance, using the Province of Ontario as the basic unit with which other provinces will be compared. Looking at ideological, economic, social and political factors, the course will follow both a critical and explanatory approach as it seeks to understand and evaluate governance at the provincial level. (Formerly PPA 522.)
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 27A/B or POL 27
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 312 Canadian Public Administration
This course is an introduction to the study of the theory and practice of public administration in Canada. What is public administration? What are the major differences and similarities between public administration and administration in the private and nonprofit sectors? How does the structure and organization of public bureaucracies affect the formulation and implementation of public policy? How are organizational changes and new forms of public bureaucracies affecting the responsiveness and accountability of public administration? Is a new form of governance emerging?
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or  POL 27A/B or POL 27, Antirequisites: PPA 22A/B, PPA 22, PPA 322, PPA 422
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 314 Controversial Policy Topics
There are a number of "hot" topics in Canadian politics at any given time, for instance, gun-control, marijuana regulation, anti-globalization protests, biotechnology and cloning regulation, homelessness, same-sex marriage, anti-terrorist government reactions, deadly infectious disease control, and anti-smoking campaigns. This course will examine a selection of these for their underlying power dynamics (Who gets what, when and how?) in order to understand what lies behind our political differences and what this might mean for our future.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 27A/B or POL 27
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 315 Equity and Human Rights
This course encourages students to think critically about what public policies might advance "human" rights. It examines the development of human rights thinking in Canada as reflected in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canada Human Rights Act, provincial codes, landmark Supreme Court rulings relating to Aboriginal peoples, disability, race, religion, gender and sexual orientation, and internationally, in United Nations conventions, covenants and declarations. Students are encouraged to situate an understanding of human rights issues within a broader social, political and economic framework. (Formerly PPA 521.)
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 316 Social Policy
This course examines the development and role of social policy in Canada. A major theme is the ideas, values, and beliefs that shaped income support, health care, disability, and education policy and the impact of the welfare state on individual well being and opportunity. The course will focus on the politics of social policy and the factors which have led to the erosion of the welfare state in Canada.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 27A/B or POL 27 or POL 106 or POL 220
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 317 Politics of Education
This course evaluates the political dynamics of education in Ontario by examining foundational concepts and theories, and by exploring weekly topics such as multiculturalism and social justice; equity issues related to class, race/ethnicity, diversity, religion, sex, and gender; parental influence in the school system; schooling and the labour market; accountability and standards; and the role of educational pressure groups. (formerly POL 506).
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 27A/B or POL 27 or POL 220 or POL 332
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 319 The Politics of Work and Labour
This course examines how labour, employers and government interact to regulate how Canadians work. Students will acquire an enriched understanding of the employment environment in their career field. An historical context is first established to explain the evolution of work, unions and government labour policy in Canada. The course then examines the legislative framework before exploring such controversial employment issues as union organising, public sector collective bargaining, strikes, minimum wage, overtime, and health and safety issues. (Formerly PPA 533.)
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 320 Social Identity and Citizenship
Liberal notions of citizenship premised on the formal equality, rights, and participation of individuals dominate our political imagination. However, social inequality, marginalization and exclusion structure citizenship rights and opportunities for political participation and civic engagement. This course explores processes of identity formation, various forms of social exclusion, and political formations of resistance in relation to institutions of citizenship.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 100 or POG 225
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 322 Social Movements and Civil Society
This course will examine contemporary mass movements, North and South, their relation to political, economic and cultural transformations commonly referred to as 'globalization,' and their articulation to the so-called 'anti-globalization' movement. In addition, the course will address the limits of liberal democratic forms of representation and the new ideas and practices of democratic governance being proposed by the movements, from strategies for reclaiming the state to community-based autonomy based on self-reliance and participatory decision-making.
UL
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 100 or POG 225 or POL 208, Antirequisite: POL 601
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 330 Social and Political Thought
The central consideration of politics is the attainment of the "good society." This history of Western political thought can be seen as an ongoing contestation of what we mean by the "good society" and what kind of political and social institutions are required for its realization. This course charts the history and contemporary relevance of these debates with a special focus on the concept of democracy from the ancient to the modern world.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 100
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 410 Urban Government in Canada
This course provides a critical examination of governance at the local level. It emphasises municipal institutions, their development and their operation but, through the lens of various relevant policy issues, the course aims to explore the ways in which business, labour, citizens' groups and the third sector interact at the local level. The coping mechanisms of local areas, when faced with such external forces as globalization, urbanisation, and provincially-mandated restructuring will be a particular area of interest.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 27A/B or POL 27, Antirequisites: POL 122, POL 222
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 412 How Governments Spend
The allocation of financial resources is an indispensable component of the delivery of programs and services in the public and nonprofit sectors. This course examines government budgeting: how are revenue and expenditure decisions made? What is the relationship between budgeting, management of the economy and social policy? Who participates in budget decision-making? How do budget decisions affect achieving social and economic goals in the public and nonprofit sectors? How does government determine if expenditures have been used to maximum benefit? What do budget decisions reveal about governance?
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 312, Antirequisites: PPA 600, PPA 634, PPA 644
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 413 Restructuring
This course examines the public sector and societal restructuring focusing on Canada within a comparative context. This restructuring has meant that the roles and relations between the state, civil society, business and labour are being fundamentally changed. In general we have moved from an era of relative security in the "developed" North to an age of insecurity. Topics include the politics of neoliberalism; privatization and offloading; impacts of restructuring on the individual, family, nonprofit sector and public sector; the convergence of social, economic and labour market policy; the role of social movements in the politics of restructuring and the various patterns of resistance to this development. (Formerly PPA 633.)
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 27A/B or POL 27 or POL 332
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 415 Public Policy Challenges
This course will focus on how governments in Canada wrestle with various policy challenges. It utilizes a comparative analysis of key policy sectors such as Environment, Health, Trade, Labour, Finance, and others. It will examine the stages of policy development and explore how policy case studies can contribute to our knowledge of what happens during policy change. Why do some policies succeed while others fail to make it onto the agenda? What is success?
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 314, Antirequisites: PPA 623, PPA 603
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 420 Urban Governance
Developments in the 20th century pushed some issues beyond the reach of national governments while simultaneously challenging urban areas to address such matters as deindustrialisation and the emergence of "world cities"; immigration, migration and multiculturalism; and urban ecology " while also providing efficient and democratic urban governance. Are cities up to the task?"This course takes the measure of some modern challenges, examines their roots, and explores various urban responses. (formerly POL 222).
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 425 Comparative Political Economy
This course explores political and economic forces and how their dynamic interaction shape relations of power between states, citizens, civil society and markets. The ideas and theories of political economy will be used to examine these relationships in comparative perspective through area case studies. A variable regional focus may include such themes as comparative "welfare" states; North-South issues; regional political economic formations such as NAFTA and the European Union.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 225
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 440 Aboriginal Governance/Justice
This course examines the social, political and historical context of aboriginal peoples in Canada, their experiences of colonialism, assimilation and genocide, their contemporary struggles for sovereignty in relationship to the Canadian state with special focus on the institutions of criminal justice. (Formerly POL 440.)
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: CRM 100 or POG 100 or POL 27A/B or POL 27, Antirequisite: CRM 400
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 442 Women and Governance
This course explores issues affecting women in key areas including violence, sexuality, reproduction, paid/unpaid work, family, culture and political representation. It assesses the legal and public policy gains by women, the reasons advancing or eroding the status of women, and the complicating impact of factors such as race, religion, culture, aboriginal background, and sexual orientation. While the focus is on Canada, the course also analyzes policy challenges to women in a "globalized" social order.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 27A/B or POL 27,  Antirequisite: POL 501
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POG 444 Politics, Media and Technology
This course examines the interplay of media, technology and politics. The mass media has affected politics and society from the earliest times, and has profoundly transformed how we communicate about, and perceive, political ideas. Possible issues to be discussed in this course include the relationship between print and the rise of modern democracy; the damaging impacts of television on contemporary politics, especially election campaigns; and the emerging political influences of the Internet. In addition, the course will analyze the structure of ownership of global media systems and its impact on international communications.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 110 or POL 27A/B or POL 27
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 27A/B Canadian Politics and Government-A/B
This course examines the exercise of authority, influence and power in Canada. Who are the decision makers? How are decisions made? In whose interest are they made? How democratic is the decision-making process? In the course these questions will be explored by investigating the institutions and structure of authority, and the various avenues of political and economic influence within the Canadian political system. This course is equivalent to POL 332 and POL 402 or POG 110 and POG 210.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Antirequisite: POL 220
Course Weight: 2.00
Billing Units: 1/1
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POL 100 Classical Political Thought
This course traces the development of our understanding of state and society through the classics of the Western tradition. Historical description, textual analysis and evaluative comment will be used to study the visions of humanity, state and society to be found in the writings of the great classic thinkers of the West.
LL
Lect: 3 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 106 The Politics of Human Needs
Political systems may be judged by how well they meet their citizens' basic human needs. What is the role of politics in satisfying human needs? How have major political theorists treated the relationship between human needs and government? What are the major obstacles in the contemporary world that stand in the way of meeting basic human needs and how might these be overcome?
LL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 122 Local Government in Canada
The principal focus of the course is a critical examination of municipal institutions particularly in Canada's large urban centres. Topics discussed include local government and democratic theory, the impact of globalization and urbanization, political and administrative structures, intergovernmental relations with emphasis on provincial-municipal relations, local finance, and major actors such as business, labour and citizens groups. The course will end with a study of the major challenges facing Canada's metropolitan regions today.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Antirequisite: POG 410
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 128 Politics and Film
Films often mirror society in both intentional and unintentional ways. Some are overtly political, some reflect changing values and some are made purely for entertainment. This course will reflect on the various political perspectives which enable students to critically assess films. It will unravel the relationship between politics and film. It will assess the role films play in reinforcing or debunking stereotypes. These themes will be examined in the context of the film industry in Canada.
LL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Restriction: IM001, IM002, IM003
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 129 Canadian Immigration
Canada is often described as a country of immigrants. By examining Canada's immigrant tradition, this course introduces students to a number of distinctive characteristics of Canada as a political community. Topics and themes include: changes in Canadian immigration policies; immigration and Canadian identity; how global migration is transforming modern politics; and the nature of human rights in an age of migration. Is Canada becoming a uniquely multicultural political community?
LL
Lect: 3 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 200 Modern Political Thought
This course examines the major political thinkers and ideologies of the Western political tradition. While each thinker's ideas are placed in their historical context, a special emphasis will be given to extracting those aspects of each political theorist's ideas which are relevant to understanding contemporary political issues.
LL
Lect: 3 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 208 Conflict and Change in World Politics
This course examines political conflict and instability in world politics. What are the political consequences of globalization? Why is nationalism and ethnic intolerance on the rise? What explains the eruption of political unrest and war? These issues are explored through current examples of political upheaval around the world.
LL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 220 Canadian Politics and Social Policy
This course examines the development and role of social policy in Canada. A major theme is the ideas, values and beliefs which shaped income support, health care and education policy and the impact of the welfare state on individual well being and opportunity. The course will focus on the politics of social policy and the factors which have led to the erosion of the welfare state in Canada.
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Antirequisites: POL 27A/B, POL 27, POL 302, POG 210
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 332 Power and Influence in Canada
In analyzing Canada's federal political system, this courses assesses the ideas, interests and institutions that help define the limits of both state and societal power. It will provide students with a clear understanding of the workings of the system of governance guiding their everyday lives as citizens and as professionals. Topics include political culture and ideas; the social and economic context; and the constitutional and institutional mechanisms of governance. (Formerly POL 302)
Lect: 3 hrs.
Antirequisite: POL 220, POL 27A/B
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 501 Women, Power, and Politics
Have women come a long way? What is feminism? How do racial minority, aboriginal, immigrant, or lesbian women differ in the way in which they prioritize political and social issues? What about the impact of religion, class and disability? This course examines public policies in Canada relating to women and work (the "glass ceiling", gender segregated labour force, domestic labour), sexuality (harassment, violence), health (reproductive technology), family, and political representation. How do different women identify directions for change?
UL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Antirequisite: POG 442
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 507 Power, Change and Technology
How does technology shape society? How does it shape us? On what basis are decisions made in a technological society? What type of future will modern technology create? Who is in control? This course will examine the impact of technology on cultural, economic and political life in modern society. The political implications of future developments in reproductive and biotechnologies, global communications, automation, etc. will be evaluated.
UL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 510 The Politics of Sexual Diversity
This course begins with an examination of homosexuality and heterosexuality as social constructs; examines the politicisation of sexual diversity and identity; and explores the place of diverse sexual identities in heterosexist society. Particular attention will be given to the way in which public policy at all levels is influenced (or not) by recognition of sexual minorities.
UL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 511 Social Well-Being in Canada
Canadians are experiencing major changes in individual well-being and opportunity. A changing job market and growing differences in income combined with dramatic increases in university, tuition, decreases in benefits from income support programs and greater reliance on for-profit health care services have altered Canadians' ability to secure their futures. This course examines the rise and decline of the welfare state: how and why these changes in well-being and opportunity are taking place.
UL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Restriction: FN001, SW001, SW002, SW003, SW004
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 540 Issues in Third World Politics
Students will be introduced to the key issues in Third World Politics. What is the Third World? What are the political, economic, social and cultural factors that account for many problems currently facing the Third World? Why are debt, hunger, authoritarianism and political instability seemingly endemic to Third World countries? Who makes decisions about economic development, gender inequality, human rights, political stability and democracy?
UL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 601 Contemporary Mass Movements
In December 1999, what has come to be known as the "anti-globalization movement" burst onto the world stage through its shut-down of the Seattle meetings of the World Trade Organization. This course will examine this movement, its historical roots, its manifestations North and South, and the ways in which it is continuous and discontinuous with the "new social movements" of the late 20th century. Students will be introduced to the major approaches and debates in the academic study of social movements. Emphasis will be placed on understanding social movements historically and in context, especially in view of developments in political economy, expansions/contractions in popular democracy, and the impact of information technologies.
UL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Antirequisite: POG322
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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POL 607 Technology and Globalization
This course examines the role of technology within a global context. What will it mean to be part of a global audience, work in a global factory, shop in a global supermarket, be governed by a world government? Can technology help to solve problems of environmental depletion and pollution? What role does technology play in escalating militarism around the world? Can technology reduce the gap between the rich and the poor within nations and between nations?
UL
Tut: 1 hr./Lect: 2 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 30A/B Practicum-A/B
This public administration program requirement is based on the student's public sector work experience. The student will submit evidence, acceptable to a Program Practicum Committee, of at least two years full-time appropriate public sector work experience relevant to the application of knowledge and skills in public administration. In this course, students undertake advanced analysis of their public sector work environment and experience. This course is graded either Pass, Fail or Fail-supplement. Any student not able to fulfill the Practicum requirements satisfactorily, will substitute the equivalent of nine one-term courses, consisting of professional and professionally related courses. Students are advised to take this course near the end of their program studies.
Lab: 3 hrs.
Prerequisites: (PPA 524 or ACS 401) and PPA 602 and PPA 624
Course Weight: 2.00
Billing Units: 1/1
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PPA 31A/B Public Policy Research Paper-A/B
The student will propose a topic in public policy for independent study, research, and analysis. The research paper topic is authorized, supervised, and evaluated by a member of faculty. Students are advised to take this course near the end of their program studies.
Lab: 3 hrs.
Prerequisites: (PPA 524 or ACS 401) and PPA 603
Course Weight: 2.00
Billing Units: 1/1
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PPA 322 Canadian Public Administration I
This course is designed to introduce students to the structure and processes and major organizational issues and problems of public administration in Canada. In simple terms, public administration involves carrying out or implementing public policies. In broader terms, the study of public administration is concerned with the unique characteristics of public organizations and the impact of institutional structures and organizational dynamics on policy implementation. This involves an examination of theories, concepts and values underlying administrative practices in public organizations.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Antirequisites: PPA 22A/B, PPA 22, POG 312
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 422 Canadian Public Administration II
This course examines and evaluates theories and practices of policy decision-making and management in the public sector. The examination of policy decision-making includes the structure and process of policy formulation and issues and problems of policy evaluation. The examination of public sector management will focus on the budgetary process and personnel management. The course will conclude with an examination of the problem of political and administrative accountability.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: PPA 322, Antirequisites: PPA 22A/B, PPA 22, POG 312
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 525 Theories of the State
This course examines major theoretical perspectives on modern industrial states, including pluralism, neoliberalism, Marxism and feminism. An effort is made to relate each perspective to relevant political issues of the day. In the final section of the course a number of thematic issues are considered from the perspective of state theory such as the role of social movements in shaping state policies and the impact of globalization on democracy and the viability of the nation-state.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 600 Financial Management
This course will provide students with an overview of public sector planning and budgetary processes, the financial management systems within governmental organizations, and mechanisms for ensuring accountability. Changing structures of accountability and the merging of private and public sector budgeting, planning and management principles will be critically evaluated. Students will also be given hands on training in accessing the financial and budgetary information relevant to public and parapublic organizations.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 601 Public/Private Partnerships
This course is designed to critically examine new partnership relationships between government and non-governmental actors and alternative modes of service delivery in Canadian public administration. Questions discussed will include: What implications do partnerships hold for public services and public accountability? What are the trends and problems in such partnership relationships? What role will government have in the future in delivering "public services"? What alternative service delivery modes are available? How are democracy and citizenship rights being affected by the move towards partnerships and alternative service delivery modes?
Lect: 3 hrs.
Antirequisite: PPA 701
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 602 Planning and Evaluation
In the current fiscal climate in which public and parapublic organizations operate, planning and evaluation of both policies and programs is critical. New standards of accountability and justification require public sector workers to engage in continuous planning and evaluation of policies and programs. This course provides students with the knowledge and skills required for designing planning and evaluation tools. The course will be focused on hands on learning and would be based on "real life" applications.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: PPA 623 or POG 314
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 603 Comparative Public Policy
Contemporary public policy has become inherently comparative in nature, as decision-makers and citizens demand that policy initiatives be justified in relation to what is happening in other jurisdictions. What are the trends and leading indicators of policy change today? Does globalization necessarily undermine the capacity of nation states to address domestic concerns? A comparative analysis of policy areas including health, immigration, human rights, environment may help explain why, and to what extent, political decision-makers really have choice.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: PPA 623 or POG 314, Antirequisite: PPA 700
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 604 Issues in Public Administration
In recent years, the public sector has undergone significant changes. Nothing less than a "reinventing" of how the administrative state functions, its role within society and the economy, and its size and scope is under way. Transformations within the public sector have been both broad and rapid. In this environment of fundamental restructuring, many new and pressing issues related to public administration continuously arise. This course is designed to be responsive to addressing key issues which emerge in the rapidly evolving public sector of today. Consequently, the issues covered by this course will change from year to year.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisites: POG 413 and PPA 525 and PPA 601 and PPA 624, Antirequisite: PPA 704
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 623 Public Policy
This course offers a theoretical introduction to the Canadian public policy-making process, but also emphasizes the practical aspect through an examination of policy formulation and implementation, policy analysis, and program evaluation. To provide a practical examination of the role of the state in reconciling competing priorities within Canadian society, to reveal patterns and to match theory with practice, the course explores specific policy fields such as civil liberties and the civilian oversight of police; economic management and industrial policy; social and environmental policy.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: PPA 422
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 624 Theories of Bureaucracy
This course surveys different approaches to organization and bureaucracy in advanced industrial societies. The major focus is on the exercise of power and control in organizations and the implications of this for different organizational groups. The course also examines a number of areas about which traditional approaches have been relatively silent, especially those dealing with race, gender and class. Another major theme of the course involves analysis of the changing nature of work, focusing on how new information technologies have affected the distribution of power and control in the workplace.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: PPA 422
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 629 Administrative Law
This course examines the statutory and regulatory basis of Canadian public administration. The course explores existing techniques of control of delegated power and their role in influencing conduct. It analyses the regulatory function of administration, as well as the institutional and procedural characteristics and practices of administrative tribunals and judicial review.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Antirequisite: PPA 702
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 650 Intergovernmental Relations
This course examines both the formal and informal relations between the federal and provincial governments of Canada, as well as the effect these relations have on Canadian politics and public policies. Themes include national unity and regional diversity, elite decision making and democratic participation, the Aboriginal question, Quebec separation, and the effects of federal/provincial turf wars on social, environment and economic policies and programs. The course culminates in a 1st Minster's Conference simulation.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: POG 210 or POL 332
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 700 Comparative Aboriginal Politics/Policies
This course examines the key issues in contemporary comparative indigenous policy and politics by comparing both the similarities and the differences between the North American experience and that of indigenous people from other lands. What are the key political and economic processes that characterize the challenges and problems currently facing indigenous nations and communities in regions around the world? The relevance of Aboriginal knowledge and wisdom to the search for solutions to contemporary environmental problems and survival issues is examined.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisites: POG 440 and PPA 442, Antirequisite: PPA 603
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 701 Aboriginal Private-Public Partnerships
This course examines the role of public/private partnerships in the economic development and delivery of services in Aboriginal communities. The challenges and opportunities of First Nations communities partnering with private and public sector organizations will be assessed, particularly in the context of governance and administration issues.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Antirequisite: PPA 601
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 702 Admin Law in an Aboriginal Context
This course examines the statutory and regulatory basis of public administration in the context of First Nations communities. It analyzes the regulatory function of administration, as well as the institutional and procedural characteristics and practices of administrative tribunal and judicial review, and assesses their relevance for First Nations communities and peoples.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Antirequisite: PPA 629
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 703 Dispute Resolution in an Aboriginal Context
This course introduces students to the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), with an in-depth focus on mediation. The course combines basic theory and concepts of ADR and conflict analysis or diagnosis, along with applying ADR in practical situations within Aboriginal communities. Students will assess the relevance of ADR and mediation within an Aboriginal context, and formulate appropriate adaptations.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Antirequisite: ACS 201
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 704 Current Issues in Aboriginal Governance
This course is designed to beresponsive to addressing key issues which emerge in the rapidly evolving establishment of Aboriginal governance. Consequently, the issues covered by this course will change from year to year. Possible areas of study include Indian Act reform, Social Policy in the context of Self-Governance, Bill C - 31, Citizenship, the Constitution and Off-Reserve Peoples.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: PPA 700, Antirequisite: PPA 604
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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PPA 705 Sustainable Development and First Nations
This course will examine alternative models of development for Aboriginal communities. Fundamental concepts of development and progress will be assessed in the context of aboriginal culture and traditions. Examples of alternative and sustainable development in other jurisdictions will be evaluated in terms of their relevance for First Nations communities and nations within Canada.
Lect: 3 hrs.
Course Weight: 1.00
Billing Units: 1
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