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  • HIS 104 - Ten Days That Shook The World
    This course explores transformative moments in history in order to understand their underlying causes and their social, cultural, political, and economic impacts on human beings and their societies. Each topic introduces students to the diverse ways historians practise their craft and seek understanding of the past and historical change so that they develop a deeper appreciation of what history "is" and "does" by considering multiple means of exploring and making sense of the past. (Formerly HST 114).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 105 - Inventing Popular Culture
    This course examines the history of popular culture, starting in the 19th century, seeking to define popular culture and understand its relationship to the formation of modern society. It considers such topics as the ideological use of popular culture, debates surrounding culture, notions of nation and community, and the growing dominance of commercial culture during a period when technology, human migration, and other factors increasingly blurred the boundaries of earlier cultural and social understanding. (Formerly HST 115).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 106 - Technology, Warfare and Social Change
    This course introduces students to the technological and social implications of warfare from the ancient to the modern age. However, rather than dwell on the minutiae of military technologies and battle strategies, it explores the technological connections between war and society through asking such questions as how conflict fostered technology exchanges and medical advances; how improved naval technology furthered exploration; how military technologies found civilian use; and how new technologies changed the ethics of war. (Formerly HST 116).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 107 - Colonization, Colonialism and Independence
    This course provides an introduction to European colonialism in Asia and Africa. We will examine the motives behind territorial acquisition, the methods employed to establish colonial control, and the responses to colonialism among subject populations, including forms of resistance and movements for independence. We will also analyze the impacts of colonialism on the societies of both the colonizers and the colonized. Some key terms in this course are: race, culture, economy, resistance, and violence.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 238 - Canada to 1885: Creating a Nation
    This is a thematic survey, covering Canadian history to 1885. Much of the course emphasizes issues which have led to the Canada we live in today, and which provide background to recurring debates in contemporary Canada. These include: Native-European relations, French-English relations, Canadian-American relations, the development of modern political parties, the compromises of Confederation, and the beginnings of regional dissatisfaction with the nation. (Formerly HST 581)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HIC 190 and HST 307
  • HIS 248 - American History to 1877
    This course traces the development of the United States from the colonial era, beginning in 1607, to the era of Reconstruction that followed the Civil War. It examines relations between native peoples and settlers, tensions between colonies and Britain, the American Revolution, contradictions between slavery and democracy, religious and social reform, promises and failures of emancipation, and considers how the America of the Jacksonian era transformed into the United States of the Gilded Age.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 110
  • HIS 265 - Asia: Foundations and Modern Nations
    This course will offer a broad introduction to Asian culture and history. We will investigate the connections and interactions between regions of Asia, as well as the interactions between Asia and "The West." The course will be broken into three periods; the first dealing with the foundations of Asian culture and history, the second dealing with the era of colonialism, and the third dealing with World War Two and the emergence of "Modern" Asia.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 275 - Ancient Greece and Rome
    This course surveys the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This course examines the development of complex societies in the Mediterranean, including the rise of Greek city-states and political thought, and the construction of Hellenism. It also examines the impact of Hellenism on Roman society, politics and government, providing an overview of the expansion of the Roman state until the 5th century CE.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 277 - Mediaeval Europe, 400-1350
    Within a broadly chronological context, this course traces the main developments in Europe from the fall of Rome to 1350. To examine the political, religious, and social changes that occurred during that time, topics include: the Barbarian Kingdoms; early western Christianity; the Byzantine Empire; the rise of Islam; Charlemagne; the Moors and the Vikings; the development of kingship; the Crusades; and life, art, learning, and culture in the High Middle Ages.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 584
  • HIS 279 - Europe, 1715-1870
    This course traces the main developments in European history from the death of King Louis XIV in France to the unification of Germany. Within a broadly chronological context it examines the political, religious, and social changes that occurred during this time. Topics include: the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, Napoleon, the Industrial Revolution, and 19th-century political and social movements.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 111 and HST 211
  • HIS 338 - Canada since 1885: Defining a Nation
    This course takes a thematic approach to Canadian history since 1885, emphasizing issues that have moulded the country and challenge us still. Main issues include French-English and Canadian-American relations, regional antagonism to the dream of a nation, political parties as a reflection of social disagreements, the influence of immigration, and the debate over Canada's role in the world. (Formerly HST 681).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HIC 190 and HST 407
  • HIS 348 - American History from 1877
    How did the United States become the world's reigning superpower? This course attempts to answer this question by tracing the development of modern America from the Gilded Age to the present. The course examines the rise of big business, the growth of the U.S. welfare state, American imperialism, the clash between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R., and the movements for equality launched by African-Americans, women, workers and immigrants, and the growing threat of terrorism.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 210
  • HIS 377 - Europe, 1350-1715
    This course traces the main developments in western Europe from the beginnings of the Renaissance to the deaths of Queen Anne in Great Britain and King Louis XIV in France. Within a broadly chronological context it examines the political, religious, and social changes that occurred during that time. Topics include: the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Counter Reformation, the Age of Discovery, the English Civil War, Louis XIV, and the Scientific Revolution.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 111
  • HIS 379 - Europe, 1870-Present
    This course examines the development of modern Europe from fragmented and warring states in the late 19th century, to relative unity and peace in the early 21st. Focusing on western and central Europe, topics include the unification of Italy and Germany, urbanization and social change, 'New' imperialism, the impacts of the First and Second World Wars, the Cold War, and the development of the European Union.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 211, HST 551
  • HIS 401 - Hearing, Seeing and Speaking History
    History is not always recorded with the written or printed word; it can be seen, heard, and spoken. In societies past and present, oral, visual, and aural records of historical events may be of equal or greater significance than a written account. This course (H-Craft 2) focuses on oral, visual, and aural traditions, as well as contemporary methods of making and maintaining cultural memory through forms such as storytelling, folklore, performance, visual arts, and song.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 461 - Cradle of Civilization: Ancient Near East
    The Ancient Near East is known by various names, including Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent, reflecting the complexity and richness of the region that gave birth to the first complex societies. This course explores the development of polities from egalitarian societies to Empires and the associated inventions of arts, literature, religion, science and technology.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 462 - Introduction to the Islamic World
    Where did Islam originate? Why did the new culture establish itself so successfully from the western shores of the Mediterranean to central Asia? This course examines the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of the Islamic world from shortly before Islam's birth in the 7th century, through the heyday of Islamic civilization (9th and 10th centuries) to the period of political fragmentation that followed. It culminates in the fall of Granada (1492).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 490 - International Relations from 1945
    This course details the global order since the Second World War. It focuses on the Cold War and issues such as: the atomic bomb, the Soviet conquest of eastern Europe, the birth of Communist China, decolonization, the Indochinese Wars, Middle Eastern conflict, the division of Berlin, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Islamic Revolution in Iran. The course also addresses the post-Cold War order and contemporary crises, including the 'war on terror' and nuclear proliferation.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HIS 590 and HST 426 and HST 500 and HST 604
  • HIS 500 - History and New Media
    Digital media and new technologies have transformed historical research, how we share our research results, and how we consume or experience history through mass media, museums, libraries, and archives. This course (H-Craft 3a) studies these changes in the context of the history of the Internet and digital media, assessing historical materials made available on the web by professional historians and curators, research institutions, as well as communities outside the historical profession. Students will have the option of developing a pilot online history project.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 501 - Archaeology and Material Culture
    This course (H-Craft 3b) focuses on how archaeological resources and material culture (such as artefacts, landscapes, architecture, and art) can be utilized to understand the past. It also explores how these resources can be integrated into documents-based historical study and newer endeavours, such as oral history. It defines historical archaeology and material culture as distinct but closely related fields, surveys their evolution as academic disciplines, and considers the limitations, challenges, and biases of these approaches.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 502 - Life Stories: Oral History
    Oral history provides a rewarding but complicated - and sometimes controversial - method of exploring the past. This course (H-Craft 3b) considers how oral history can provide wider access to the past than traditional forms of evidence, while also examining criticisms of oral history as a valid research tool, and how oral history methods and standards have evolved in response. Each student will conduct an oral research project within the framework of an ethics review process.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 505 - Locating The Past: Archival Research
    This course (H-Craft 4) introduces students to the nature of archival collections and their use in conducting historical research. It considers: the types of records available in archives; how to find them; the methods of evaluating various archival documents, along with the challenges archivists face as they collect, arrange, preserve, and make available the records in their care; and the ways these challenges affect a historian's ability to analyze the past.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 510 - Museology and Public History
    This course explores the history, practice, and diversities of museological endeavour from the emergence of the first museums and galleries during the Renaissance down to the present day. Through lectures, films, seminars, and field trips, we examine the core functions of museums (acquiring, preserving, studying, interpreting, and exhibiting collections for the public benefit) and we study critical debates and issues affecting museums, art galleries, historic sites, and heritage organizations.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 541 - Canada and the First World War
    This course surveys the political, military, economic, social experience of Canada and Canadians during the First World War. Topics will include social and political change, conscription, industrial development, linguistic, racial and religious tensions, military strategy, the peace settlement, and the way Canadians have remembered the War over the last century. This course questions whether Canada experienced a "national transformation" during the War and examine the process, nature, and impact of this transformation.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 556 - Colonial Africa
    This course examines the history of the continent under colonial rule from the end of the 19th century to the late 20th. Topics include: explorations of the nature, depth, and extent of colonial expansion; the establishment of colonial economies and the resulting distortion of pre-existing production and distribution systems; class formation and changes in gender relations; the emergence of nationalism; pan-Africanism; and the changing role of Africa in the wider world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 633
  • HIS 559 - Ancient Egypt
    Popular histories of ancient Egypt often only explore New Kingdom pharaohs, such as Tutankhamen and Rameses II. This course provides a broad social history, beginning with the roots of Egyptian civilization prior to c.3000 BCE and ending with the Late Period (c.712-323 CE). Through art, archaeology and literature, students will consider changes over time in the political, social, religious, and everyday life of Egypt, as well as its economic and cultural ties with the ancient Near East and Mediterranean worlds.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 561 - The Ottoman Empire
    This course examines the growth of the Ottoman state in the Middle East from the conquest of Constantinople in 1453, through its expansion into Europe and its confrontations with Iran, until its ultimate disintegration into nation states in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The course highlights political and urban cultures, relations with other regional powers, and religious culture and society to understand this multi-ethnic and multi-religious empire that bridged both European and Asian worlds.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 590 - Modern International Relations
    To understand the complexities of the modern world, we must have a firm grasp of international relations. What forces - political, social, or economic - have changed our world since 1945? What was the Cold War and what does its ending mean? This course uses history to illuminate relations and developments in specific areas, such as Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. It also trains students in how to formulate questions and find information effectively. (Formerly HST 500).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HIS 490 and HST 604
  • HIS 594 - War to War: World Conflict, 1900-45
    The first half of the 20th century was dominated by two world wars and fragile peace settlements conditioned by unresolved military factors, a major global economic crisis, the birth of Communist Russia, the rise of non-European powers, the emergence of international organizations, and the roots of the Cold War. This course examines the causes of the two world conflicts, both diplomatic and military, their far-reaching consequences, and their impact on peoples and societies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 504 and HST 702 and HST 802
  • HIS 610 - Curating the Past
    Curatorship is the distinct - and often contested - scholarly endeavour centred in museums, art galleries, and historic sites. Curators develop collections, use artefacts, artworks, landscapes, heritage properties, and archaeological resources to create meaning, and communicate their findings through exhibits, restorations, publications, and other media. We examine curatorship and connoisseurship through lectures, films, seminars, and field trips to serve students interested in curatorial methodologies as well as those wishing to explore museums intellectually and/or as career destinations.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: HIS 510 or HIS 755
  • HIS 615 - Film, Television and 20th C History
    No previous century has been as thoroughly documented as the last one. Film has left us vivid images of its leading personalities, its struggles, and its changing social attitudes. This course will present a reconstruction of the 20th century through the medium of film. Clips will be shown to illustrate selected aspects of war, revolution, colonialism, and social change. They will be international in scope, reflecting the time in which they were made. (Formerly HST 930).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 656 - Post-Colonial Africa
    The course examines the contemporary history of the continent. It explores both the colonial legacy and independent African initiatives since decolonization. Students explore the nature, depth, and extent of colonialism with respect to economic, political, and social institutions, processes, and movements. Topics include class formation, religious change, sexual politics, popular culture, and gender relations. The course also explores Africa's and Africans' changing roles in the wider world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 633
  • HIS 661 - The Middle East from 1908
    This course surveys major events in the Middle East, beginning with the creation of new states out of the former Ottoman Empire and changes of leadership within Egypt, Iran, and the Gulf States. It also explores the creation of Israel, regional conflict, and emphasizes the political and economic involvement in state formation by western governments and corporations. Students consider the varied forms of nationalisms and governments in the region created by both reform and revolution.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 522
  • HIS 662 - The Mughal Empire, 1526-1764
    This course explores the great empire of South Asia throughout its more than two centuries of dominance, and considers the religious and cultural influences of the Mughals, their consolidation of power and territory, imperial administrative efficiencies, the arrival of Europeans, and the opening of trade. It also examines the various forces of internal opposition and revolt that weakened the empire, concluding with the Seven Years? War and the beginning of British rule.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 677 - Society in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1500
    This course examines important themes in European social and economic history from the beginning of growth of mediaeval economic systems by 1000 to the first wave of global exchange in the 1490s. Topics include: everyday family life, the great household, the late mediaeval church, war, technology, craft, trade, agriculture, famine, and plague.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 584
  • HIS 678 - The Renaissance in Europe
    The Renaissance was a formative period in the development of European civilization. Well known as an era of magnificent painting, sculpture, and architecture, it was also a time of exploration around the world, of colonization, the reintroduction of slavery, theorizing about politics and history, and also of map-making that gave Europeans new opportunities for self-conceptualization. New codes of "civility" redefined both the European sense of self and its judgements of other peoples.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 731
  • HIS 683 - Victorian Britain
    This course examines the development of Britain from the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 to the early 20th century. During this period, the U.K.'s economic strength and international influence were unparalleled, but the country also faced serious social and political tensions fuelled by rapid industrialization and urbanization. This course explores the consequences of these developments through topics such as political radicalism and reform, social class identities, imperial cultures, domesticity, poverty, and consumerism.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 488
  • HIS 696 - The History of Terrorism
    Terrorism is a contentious and subjective term that has been part of the international system since ancient times. This course offers an historical overview of terrorism and its effect on the global order by focusing on the origins, structure, and dynamics of terrorism as an instrument of both state and non-state actors, plus corresponding counter-terrorism strategies. It pays particular attention to 19th- and 20th-century terrorism and the current international "war on terror".
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 710 - Managing Heritage Resources
    Heritage management includes creating, administering, preserving, and programming historical resources. Through lectures, films, seminars, and field trips, we explore these activities in two contexts: first, within the controlled realms of museums, galleries, and historic sites; and second out into the world beyond, where there are diverse community interests to serve in relation to tangible historical properties and cultural landscapes, as well as elusive "sites of memory" owned by the public, nonprofit, and private sectors.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: HIS 510 or HIS 755
  • HIS 742 - Canadian Cultural Industries
    This course introduces students to the history of Canadian culture and cultural industries. It considers a number of issues including: the rise of mass culture; the impact of American culture on Canada; the creation of cultural institutions like the CBC, the NFB, and the Canada Council; the evolution of government cultural policy; the interaction between popular and "high" culture; and the development of popular magazines, radio, film, and television. (Formerly HST 564).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 755 - Material Cultures of North America
    We study historical objects, buildings, landscapes, and their meanings through a number of themes in North American material culture (including their international contexts) up to the early 1900s. Areas of focus vary each year, but may include the material cultures of the First Nations, military technology, settler expansion, the workplace, the home, landscape, and architecture, along with the roles objects and buildings play in the immaterial realms of memory, faith, and identity. (Formerly HST 723).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 762 - The Making of Modern South Asia, 1757-1947
    This course explores the making of modern South Asia. We will examine how the British East India Company established its foothold in India in the 17th century and the nature of British colonial over the subsequent 250 years. We will also investigate the nationalist struggle, led by Gandhi (amongst others), which culminated in independence, but also the violence and chaos of partition, out of which the nation-states of India and Pakistan were born.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 783 - 20th-Century Britain
    In the early 1900s, Britain was a dominant imperial, military, and economic power. By the end of the century, the empire was gone and the country's international status had been eclipsed by the United States and the European Union. This course charts these developments through the impacts of the two world wars, decolonization, the welfare state, postwar affluence, youth cultures, "Thatcherism", and "New Labour". Course materials include historical analyses, contemporary documents, film, and music.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 488 and HST 789
  • HIS 790 - Modern Germany
    Germany became an economic and military powerhouse in the late 19th century. Yet by 1945, after two world wars, the country lay in ruins and remained divided until 1990. This course examines the political, economic, and social development of Germany from the 1870s to the present. Topics include the growth of the German Empire and the Great War, the rise of Nazism, the Second World War, East and West Germany, and the process of reunification.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 826 - Science and World Exploration
    Humanity always has sought to control nature through prayer, inventions, or new knowledge. This course examines early medicine, astrology, and exploration within diverse cultures and civilizations, then focuses on how inventions and special knowledge, often "borrowed" from other cultures, enabled Europe's exploration, imperialism, and quest to control nature, societies and economies from 1400 to 1900. The quest for control had many unforeseen consequences: environmental damage, new human rights issues, and the emergence of racism. (Formerly HST 561).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 828 - Science, Corporations and the Environment
    The exploitation and funding of science by corporate industries has created a range of serious problems, from distorted "science" to chemical products that damage the environment and harm humans. This course will examine corporate and scientific responsibility through case studies including I.G. Farben and chemical weapons, the development of refrigerants (ozone depletion), pesticides, gasoline additives, pollutants (Love Canal, Erin Brockovich), fraudulent medical and cigarette research, and the looming challenges of Genetically Modified Foods and organisms. (Formerly HST 562).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 845 - Canada in the International Sphere
    This course introduces students to the history of Canada's international relations in the modern era. It examines Canada's relations with other countries, the country's role in the two world wars, the evolution of the Empire-Commonwealth, and Canada's role and participation in the Cold War and its aftermath. It highlights the shift from a policy centred on western nations and the Commonwealth to one that embraces the broader complexities of the modern world. (Formerly HST 911).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 854 - African-American History
    The African-American experience spans 400 years, beginning with the forced migration of Africans to colonial America. With an emphasis on Black political thought and social action, this course examines how African-Americans sustained themselves through 250 years of racial slavery and subsequent Jim Crow segregation in the 20th century. It explores Black Americans' ongoing struggle for racial equality through organized movements, community building, and the development of unique cultural and social traditions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 721
  • HIS 886 - The British Empire and the World
    For nearly four centuries, Britain ruled over the largest colonial empire in the world. This empire was the product of a long history of naval and commercial opportunities shrewdly exploited by various British leaders. This course examines the key role played by the empire in assuring Britain's prosperity, from the first settlements until the 1930s, along with the British colonial "model" and the decolonization that followed the end of the Second World War. (Formerly HST 722).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 898 - A History of International Organizations
    This course examines the history of international organizations and assesses their role and impact in the international system since 1900. It explores the rise and fall of the League of Nations, the rise of "internationalism" during the Second World War, the creation of the United Nations, and the evolution of international organizations during and after the Cold War. Other topics include regional and cultural organizations, peacekeeping, and the rise of NGOs. (Formerly HST 563).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 900 - Experiential Learning I
    Experiential History allows individuals or small groups of History students to pursue the historian's craft outside of the classroom in professional, career-oriented contexts through internships, work placements, or other opportunities, such as working in museums or heritage sites, participating in archaeological excavations, or conducting research for professors. Students must make all necessary arrangements at least six weeks before the beginning of term. Contact the Chair of History for details on how to proceed. (Formerly HST 851).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • HIS 901 - Experiential Learning II
    Experiential History allows individuals or small groups of History Specialists who have completed HIS 900 to pursue a different opportunity related to the historian's craft in professional, career-oriented contexts through internships, work placements, working in museums or heritage sites, participating in archaeological excavations, conducting research, etc. Students must make all necessary arrangements at least six weeks before the beginning of term. Contact the Chair of History for details on how to proceed.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
    Prerequisites: HIS 900
  • HIS 902 - Thesis Course
    While the senior seminars have significant writing requirements, the Thesis course provides a collegial opportunity for History Specialists to engage in more advanced research and writing in an area of particular interest to them at a level greater than would be possible in the seminars. Students must make all necessary arrangements at least six weeks before the beginning of term. Contact the Chair of History for details on how to proceed.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • HIS 903 - Senior Seminar I: Cross-Field Study
    This seminar explores historical themes across two or more fields. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: HST 900
  • HIS 916 - Senior Seminar II: Science, Technology and Medicine
    This seminar explores aspects of the history of science and technology. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 931 - Senior Seminar III: Americas
    This seminar explores aspects of the history of the Western Hemisphere on a national, regional, or thematic basis. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 956 - Senior Seminar IV: Africa
    This seminar explores aspects of the history of Africa on a national, regional, or thematic basis. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 957 - Senior Seminar V: Middle East
    This seminar explores aspects of the history of the Middle East on a national, regional, or thematic basis. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 958 - Senior Seminar VI: Asia
    This seminar explores aspects of the history of Asia on a national, regional, or thematic basis. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 976 - Senior Seminar VII: Europe
    This seminar explores aspects of the history of Europe on a national, regional, or thematic basis. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HIS 990 - Senior Seminar VIII: International Relations
    This seminar explores aspects of the history of International Relations. Topics will vary from year to year; however, common approaches will include a study of the historiography around issues, the sources available for studying issues, their relative merits, research strategies, and the specifics of the topics explored in the course. As well, students will present the findings of their own research in class.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • HST 110 - U.S. History: Colonial Era to 1877
    This course surveys the creation and development of the "Thirteen Colonies" and the American republic, from the 17th century through the period after the Civil War. Topics include: the settlement and growth of the colonies, European-Native relations, the American Revolution, the Constitution, westward expansion, Jacksonian America, the market revolution and rise of the factory system, slavery and abolitionism, women and reform, the Civil War, and Reconstruction.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 248
  • HST 111 - World Turned Upside Down: Europe 1350-1789
    Early modern Europe was torn by contradiction and conflict. Rediscovery of the ancients and reinterpretation of the Bible produced a new culture but split Christianity. The nation state, the Atlantic economy, modern capitalism and new empires developed amid revolt and resistance. Growing literacy and modified gender relations reshaped society. Witches were still burned while scientists transformed knowledge; an age of reason emerged while war grew more terrible. Out of all this came Europe's world domination.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 279 and HIS 377
  • HST 112 - East Meets West: Asia in the World
    Where does East meet West? By exploring the role of Asia in globalization, Western colonialism in Asia, the world wars and the emergence of contemporary Asia, this course demonstrates how boundaries have been contested and (re)defined through military, political, commercial, cultural, and religious exchanges. It allows students to rethink common categories such as race, region, nation, culture, and civilization from an international perspective.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • HST 118 - The City in History
    The majority of humanity now lives in urban areas. How, when, and why did people shift from rural to urban life? Using a wide range of sources, this course introduces students to the development of cities and urban cultures from the ancient world to the modern metropolis. It examines both the causes and the effects of urbanization, and considers how people have shaped - and been shaped by - urban environments around the world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • HST 119 - Rise of Empires: History Through Film
    Can film provide valid insight into our past? How do we understand film as historical artifact? This course tries to answer these questions and many others by exploring films which deal with early European imperialism, that is, from the time of Columbus to the end of the First World War. The topics will be international in scope, drawing on aspects of Asian, African, and Latin American history, and examining both "blockbuster" and independent films.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • HST 147 - Introduction to South Asian Civilization
    This course will provide an overview of South Asian civilization, examining the roots of Indian culture in the ancient period, the emergence of Buddhism in the late Vedic Age, the "classical period" of kingships prior to 1200, and the Mughal Empire, which defined an "Islamic World System" in the medieval years. We will then investigate the path to European colonialism, including tracing the dynamics of caste, gender, and identity over time.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • HST 207 - Introduction to Ancient Greece and Rome
    This course introduces students to the "Classical" civilizations of Ancient Greece and Rome. It considers the rise of the Greek city-states, the transmission of culture and ideas to Rome and the impact of these cultures on contemporary society.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 275
  • HST 210 - U.S. History: 1877 to the Present
    This course surveys the period from industrialization and westward expansion in the late 19th century up to the political shifts of the present day. Topics covered include: the rise of Big Business and unions, mass migration, the growth of cities, American imperialism, popular culture, the Great Depression and New Deal, war (First, Second, Vietnam, and others), the Cold War, civil rights and social movements, the New Right, and U.S. interests abroad.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 348
  • HST 211 - Century of Revolution: Europe 1789-1914
    The French Revolution launched the modern age, in politics, society, the family, the arts, and war. The 19th century brought fresh revolutions: technology and industrialization transformed work and leisure, life and death; liberalism and revolutionary socialism challenged the old order; and science altered forever humanity's place in the universe. Yet this was also a century of ruthless imperialism and aggressive and intolerant nationalism. This period is essential for understanding our world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 279 and HIS 379
  • HST 219 - Decolonization: History Through Film
    Can film provide valid insight into our past? How do we understand film as historical artifact? Films in this course will examine aspects of colonial rule in Asia and Africa from the end of the First World War to the late 20th century. There will be an emphasis on the struggle for liberation from the grip of colonial empires and the neo-imperialism practiced by the superpowers during the Cold War.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • HST 222 - The History of The Caribbean
    This course examines the development of societies in the Caribbean from the intrusion of European explorers and settlers c.1492 to the dismantling of the slave systems in the 19th century, and beyond to issues, such as independence, affecting the region in modern times.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • HST 307 - Canada to 1885: The Founding Societies
    What past events lie behind French Quebec's current attitude towards Canada? Why do Canadians have a love-hate relationship with the U.S.? How have the struggles of other nations influenced Canadian development? What principles do our political parties follow, and where do these ideas come from? These and other questions are examined in lectures and discussions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 238 and HST 581
  • HST 325 - History of Science and Technology I
    This course explores the major scientific and technical advances in Western civilization from the Ancient World to 1700 CE. It treats the sciences and technology as being historically significant in themselves, and also as a part of the larger social and cultural framework. Major topics include: Greek natural philosophy, Graeco-Roman technology, mediaeval technology and social change, the Renaissance and technology, and the scientific revolution of the 1600s. Emphasis is placed on the transformation of physics and astronomy associated with Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Descartes, and Newton.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 216 and HIS 417
  • HST 328 - Multiple Ontarios: 1784 to the Present
    This course examines Ontario's social and economic development from the late 1700s to the present, emphasizing the province's long history of settlement by diverse populations. It considers Ontario's identity by juxtaposing perspectives that emphasize Ontario's colonial past and lasting loyalty to the British Empire with those that present a multicultural, forward focused, industrializing, and urbanizing province. To highlight Ontario's continued diversity, the course explores "multiple Ontarios": aboriginal, northern, rural, urban, and suburban.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HST 550 and HST 650
  • HST 407 - Canada from 1885: The Struggle for Identity
    This course continues the examination of issues studied in HST 307 at a later period. Also discussed are themes such as the reasons for, and the extent of, political and social protest in Canada, the emergence of different visions of Canadian nationalism, and the opposition to these visions - the provinces' struggle for power, Quebec's struggle for identity, and the West's struggle for equality.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIC 190 and HIS 338 and HST 681
  • HST 425 - History of Science and Technology II
    This course surveys the richness and diversity of scientific knowledge and the influence of technological change in Western civilization from the 1700s to the 21st century. From the Industrial Revolution, development of electricity, Darwinian evolution, Einstein's relativity, and other breakthroughs, students learn how new theories and practices accelerated the pace of change, created new problems, altered our understanding of the world and ourselves, and changed the social, political, and economic conditions surrounding modern life.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 316 and HIS 417
  • HST 426 - Major Themes in International Relations
    This course examines key aspects of international relations from the creation of the Westphalian system (1648) to the present. Topics include the methods and structures established to mediate relations between states, the bureaucratization of diplomacy, the rise of international institutions and law, the emerging notion of human rights, and the challenges to the Westphalian system engendered by globalization, international terrorism, and the rise of intrastate conflicts.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HIS 390 and HIS 490
  • HST 488 - Britain since 1815
    This course traces the social, political, and cultural development of Britain from the early 19th century to the present. Topics include working-class life during the Industrial Revolution, political reform and the widening of the franchise, the expansion and contraction of the British Empire, the impact of the two world wars, and the emergence of postwar affluence and "permissiveness." The course concludes with discussion of Thatcherite conservatism and the rise of Tony Blair's "New" Labour Party.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: HST 683 and HST 783
  • HST 501 - The American Civil War
    This course surveys the history of the Civil War, from its origins in 19th-century tensions through to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Topics include: slavery, the growth of sectionalism, birth of the Republican Party, breakdown of the political system, justifications for and against secession, the founding of the Confederacy, the military conflict, life on the home front, Union victory, sectional reconciliation, and postwar conditions for freed Blacks.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 503 - Crime and Punishment in Modern Canada
    This course is a historical inquiry into crime and punishment in 20th-century Canada. The major focus of the course is an examination of the social history of crime, which includes historical attitudes toward crime, definitions of what actions constitute criminal behaviour and how they change over time, and finally, the evolution of the relationship between the criminal justice system and social change.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 504 - War to War: World Conflict 1900-45
    The two world wars between 1914 and 1945 have transformed our planet. In 1900 Europe dominated international relations; since then we have seen the rise of the superpowers of the United States and the Soviet Union, and a shift in power to the non-European world of Asia, Africa, and Latin America. This course examines the causes and significance of these changes. Topics include political, economic, and military factors, war-making, and peace-keeping.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 506 - The Ancient Egyptian World
    This course introduces students to the complex civilization that was ancient Egypt (ca. 3500-323 BCE). Through analysis of both material culture and historical records, students will familiarize themselves with ancient Egyptian history, and engage with ancient Egypt beyond the exotic images of mummies and pyramids.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: HIS 559
  • HST 510 - The United States after 1945
    Between 1945 and the present, the U.S. experienced rapid social, economic, and cultural change that re-shaped racial, gender, ethnic, class, and sexual politics. This course examines the major domestic, cultural, and social issues of the post-Second World War period. Topics include: domestic anti-Communism, youth culture, consumer culture, social movements of the 1960s, identity politics, immigration, the labour movement, the rise of the New Right, and the culture wars.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 511 - Quebec in Canada: A History
    The relationship between Quebec and the rest of the country is a complex one, involving conquest, submission, survival, compromise, cooperation and confrontation. This course explores the twists and turns of the historical relationship in order to provide a deeper appreciation of the place of Quebec in Canada and of the nature of modern Quebec society.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 522 - The Middle East: 1908 to the Present
    This course surveys the history of the Middle East from early twentieth-century to the present. Important topics include the role of colonial powers in the region, the development of modern Middle Eastern societies and nation states, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the impact of the Cold War, the emergence of political Islam, the tension between authoritarian modernization projects and social movements for democracy, and the experiences of ordinary men and women in the region.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: HIS 661
  • HST 523 - Colonial South Asia, 1757-1947
    This course will focus on colonialism in India; the advent of East India Company Rule, the transition to Crown rule, the origins of the Indian National Congress and the Muslim League, early protests against the colonial state, mounting mass movements, the leadership of Gandhi, and the politics of the Pakistan movement. We will look closely at Hindu/Muslim relations during the lead up to independence and end with the partition of India in 1947.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 526 - Women and Gender in U.S. History
    How did women contribute to the construction of modern America, to debates over war and peace, the struggle for civil and workers' rights, the fields of leisure and entertainment, and their own fight for equality? Placing women's experiences at the centre of historical analysis, this course develops students' understanding of the major political, economic, and social developments of 20th-century America, while also examining how ideas about sexual difference have been constructed and deployed throughout history.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 527 - Toronto: Wilderness to Metropolis
    In less than 200 years Toronto has grown from a small town into a major metropolis. This course looks at elements in that development, such as: immigration and its effects, 19th-century social classes and ethnic rivalries, the growth and movement of industry, pollution problems, the struggle over municipal services, urban calamities, the absorption of other communities, problems of the poor, the growth of suburbs, and the emergence of a multicultural city.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 532 - Elizabethan England
    A brief analysis of political and religious changes under earlier Tudor monarchs from 1485 sets the stage for an examination of continuing challenges in religion, foreign wars and invasion attempts, as well as the politics of female rule. The course also analyses broad structural changes affecting the non-elite: new views of poverty, agricultural changes, the growth of London and its entertainments, expanding education and literacy, new views of families and children, and fear of witches.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 533 - Africa Before 1850
    This course deals with African history before European colonization. The approach is thematic and the course focus will shift with developments in the field. Some themes that might be included are: the use of oral tradition, the development of ancient civilizations and states in Africa, the spread of Islam, the Atlantic Slave Trade, trade networks, and the shift to "legitimate commerce." This course is best taken with HST 633.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 540 - Espionage: A Modern History
    Hidden codes, special devices, fiendish villains, and top secrets all have a special place in popular culture, but as alluring as the mythology may be, it does not answer important questions about the roles that espionage and intelligence agencies play in international relations. This course covers the evolution of spying and spy services from the late 19th century to the present, focusing on the effects of major issues such as the two world wars, the Cold War, 9-11, and international security threats today.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 541 - Unknown Canada: Rebels, Rioters, Strikers
    The image many Canadians have of their history is one of compromise, complacency, and of giving in to authority. In actual fact, Canadian history is filled with mass protests, many of them quite violent. This course looks at many of the protests which contained mass violence in the 1812-1950 period. The focus of the course is on why these protests occurred, who protested and who opposed the protests, and what the protests achieved.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 551 - Problems in 20th-Century Western Europe
    This course avoids the survey approach by enabling students to concentrate on certain specific aspects of 20th-century Western European history. Each semester explores a different set of topics, which will be examined in some depth, taking into account social, political, economic, and geographical ramifications. Examples of subjects that might be examined include: "France in the 20th Century" or "Britain: Grandeur and Decline."
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 555 - Late Qing and Republican China, 1839-1949
    This course covers the late Qing dynasty (1839-1911) and Republican China (1911-49). It explores China's semi-colonization under Western and Japanese aggressions; reforms, rebellions, revolutions, frequent regime shifts, and political disintegration; the construction of new political theories and cultures; the rise of a Shanghai-centred urban popular culture; and evolving gender relations. Within these themes, an important subject is the role of Chinese people of different socio-economic classes, ethnicities, genders, and locales in creating the new nation.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 580 - Natives and Newcomers to 1763
    How did the First Nations of the Canadian and American Great Lakes region develop through the millennia? What happened at their first encounters with Europeans? How did they face the challenges posed by missionaries and traders? What happened during the tragic epidemics of the 1600s? How did war and conflict re-shape the aboriginal world? Explore these and other important questions in indigenous history in this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 584 - Mediaeval Europe: 400-1400
    This course traces the main developments in Europe from the fall of Rome to 1400. Within a broadly chronological context, we examine the political, religious, and social changes that occurred during that time. Topics include: the barbarian kingdoms, early Western Christianity, the Byzantine Empire, the rise of Islam, Charlemagne, the Moors and the Vikings, the development of the new kingship, the Crusades, and life, art, learning, and culture in the High Middle Ages.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: HIS 277
  • HST 585 - Southeast Asia: War and Peace since 1945
    The Vietnam War made Indochina the most heavily bombed region in history. It also engulfed global powers like France, Japan, China, and the U.S. But there is more to Southeast Asia than war. This course explores diverse histories and societies in the region; scrutinizing ideas of nation, state, and citizenship; and exploring political, social, and cultural change since 1945. It also examines contemporary issues, such as separatism, religious extremism, globalization, environmentalism, and continuing political instability.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 587 - Britain, 1688-1815
    This course covers a 127-year span during which Great Britain rose to become the modern world's first superpower and the most influential country of this era. Within a broadly chronological context we will examine the political, religious, economic, and social conditions of this time. Topics will include: union between England and Scotland, 18th-century society, the Georgian age, Empire, the Seven Years' War, the Enlightenment, George III, the Industrial Revolution, and the Napoleonic Wars.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 602 - Propaganda!
    This course examines modern propaganda, a distinctive form that dates to the turn of the twentieth century, and follows its evolution during the World Wars and the Cold War; its application in the First Gulf War; and in the Global War on Terror in response to the 9/11 attacks. Analysis of these events will illustrate propaganda's successes and failures as well as its unintended consequences, from military/political "blowback" to the fueling of conspiracy culture.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 603 - The Third Reich
    This course introduces students to the history of Germany's Third Reich and its international impact from its origins in the 1920s to the aftermath of its defeat in 1945. Topics include the birth of Nazism in Weimar Germany; Adolph Hitler's rise to power; Nazi government, economy, and society; the Holocaust; territorial expansion; the conduct of the Second World War; the collapse of the Third Reich; and ongoing deliberations about its legacies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 604 - The Uneasy Peace: The Cold War, 1945-90
    This course explores the story of the Cold War, a conflict that dominated international relations for much of the postwar period. Topics include the emergence of the United States and Soviet Union as superpowers, the division of Europe after 1945, the creation of Cold War alliances, decolonization, superpower conflict by proxy, the rise of regional powers, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the legacy of the conflict for the 21st century.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: HIS 490 and HIS 590 and HST 500
  • HST 610 - The Rise of the American Empire
    The United States was born in resistance to imperialism, but today comprises the most extensive empire in world history. With a particular emphasis on the post-1900 period, this course analyses the political, military, economic, and cultural developments that contributed to the transformation of this isolationist nation into the globe's dominant power. We will trace some of the winners and losers in this process, along with the resistance to American empire generated by opponents both within and beyond U.S. borders.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 632 - England in the 17th Century
    Political, financial, and religious crises under the early Stuart monarchs led to civil war and revolution, and, briefly, unparalleled liberty. The Restoration brought new ideas but also renewed political-religious conflict, which led to the last successful invasion of England. The course also examines England's naval strength, the new utilitarian science, overseas ventures, and the beginnings of the fiscal-military state, as well as the growth of London, attitudes towards death, and the changing roles of women.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 633 - Modern Africa
    What historical dynamics have produced the Africa we know today? How far are today's problems rooted in the colonial experience? This course examines the history of the continent from the beginning of the colonial period to the present. Some of the themes covered include: resistance to colonial rule, the development of nationalism, class formation, changing gender roles, Africa in the world economy, and democratization movements. This course is best taken with HST 533.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: HIS 556 and HIS 656
  • HST 641 - Protest in Canada since 1870
    The image many Canadians have of their history is one of compromise, complacency, and of giving in to authority. In actual fact, Canadian history is filled with mass protests. This course focuses on different groups who staged mass protests in the period 1870-1995, including movements to purify "evil" Canadian society, the women's movement, anti-conscription protests in two world wars, anti-Asian protests in British Columbia, regional protests in eastern and western Canada, nationalist protests in Quebec, and First Nations protests.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 651 - Problems in 20th-Century Eastern Europe
    This course avoids the survey approach by enabling students to concentrate on certain specific aspects of 20th-century Eastern European history. Each semester will be devoted to a different topic or topics, which will be examined in some depth, taking into account social, political, economic, and geographical ramifications. Examples of subjects that might be examined include: "Eastern and Central Europe 1914-91" or "The Soviet Union: From Lenin to Gorbachev."
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 655 - People's Republic of China, 1949-Present
    This course covers the diverse years of the People's Republic of China. For the Mao Zedong period, we explore socialist reformations, the Anti-rightist Movement, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and the making of Communist citizens within a new hierarchy. For the post-Mao years, we examine how ongoing reforms and open door policies de-communized the country as part of our investigation into China's painful and twisted journey to modernity in a global context.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 657 - Culture/Politics of Difference in the U.S.
    This course examines the intersecting histories of racial, ethnic, gender, class, and sexual difference in the United States since the turn of the 20th century. Starting with the mass immigration from Eastern and Southern Europe, which began in the 1890s, and ending with the most recent debates about identity politics, this course charts the demographic, cultural, and political changes that have complicated ideas of, and responses to, "difference" in the United States.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 658 - Sex in the City
    This course addresses how cities have fostered both commercial and noncommercial sexual cultures, sexual communities, and sex districts over time. Students will examine the histories of male and female prostitution, the development of non-heterosexual urban communities, cultures of urban romance, visual representations of sex and cities, and the histories of gender, race, class, politics and culture that structure these issues of sex in the city.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 680 - Natives and Newcomers from 1763
    How did the First Nations of the Great Lakes defend their interests when settlers flooded the region after 1763? What happened to them in the American Revolution and other frontier conflicts? What were the results for natives when Euroamericans forced them onto reservations or demanded they assimilate? What were the impacts of modernization after 1850? Explore these and other critical issues in native-newcomer relations in this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 701 - Scientific Technology and Modern Society
    Our lives are shaped by scientific knowledge applied to new inventions. This course examines how scientific technology both reflects and transforms our society, and how it created key fundamental industries in our high-tech, energy-dependent society. It covers the invention of modern electrical and transportation systems, modern warfare, problems of biotechnology, the ethics of industrial chemistry, nuclear energy and the atomic bomb, and the computer revolution.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 702 - The First World War
    This course examines the causes, conduct, and outcomes of the world's first total war. Key themes include pivotal military events, soldiers' experiences, and, especially, the interactions between the home front and the front lines that distinguished the Great War from earlier conflicts and that shaped its outcome and long-term consequences. Accordingly, the connections between the political, military, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the war are central topics of study in this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 711 - Canada and the United States
    This course explores a pivotal relationship in Canada's development by looking beyond formal ties, such as treaties, to political, economic, and cultural forces with the United States. It starts in the 18th century, but the major focus is on the 20th century, when the two countries were never closer. Topics include the Cold War, economic links, tensions, culture and nationhood, and Free Trade.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 712 - The American City
    This course is a cultural and social history of the American city, focusing on late-19th and 20th-century New York and Los Angeles. We examine how issues such as how immigration/migration, race, gender, sexuality, public space, architecture, urban planning, and consumerism have shaped the lives and cultures of cities and city residents.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 731 - Renaissance and Reform: Europe 1350-1650
    While taking various forms, both the Renaissance and Reformation marked breaks with mediaeval Europe that radically transformed life in the early modern period. Each was built on, or incorporated, socio-economic changes, scholarly developments, the advent of printing, new forms of political authority, and stunning cultural and intellectual achievement. Yet while intermixed, the two movements were also fundamentally different: while one commonly celebrated the human and worldly, the other sought a purified Christian faith.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: HIS 678 and HIS 778
  • HST 777 - Medicine from Antiquity to 1500 CE
    The dread of disease, physical pain, and mental suffering always has loomed large in human experience. How did people in the past react to sickness? What kinds of diseases affected people's lives, and what approaches did they take to hold diseases at bay? This course covers disease and medical practice from antiquity to 1500 CE within the contexts of the ancient Near East, Greek and Roman society, the Islamic world, and mediaeval Europe.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 786 - Science and Technology in Islamic History
    In the early centuries of Islam, the study of the natural world was held in high esteem. Scientists and engineers were called upon to solve practical problems that emerged with the new religion. Debates occurred over whether, and to what extent, scientific inquiry was appropriate in Islam. This course surveys major developments in scientific knowledge and technological know-how, from the 7th-century rise of Islam to 1600 CE, along with their impacts upon the Western world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 787 - Astronomy vs Astrology
    Today the difference between astronomy and astrology is defined with clarity, with the former recognized as an established scientific discipline and the latter regarded as a pseudoscience, rejected for its lack of credibility. Such was not always the case, as astrology gave birth to astronomy. This course explores the complex interrelationship between the two from the third millennium BCE to 1700 CE.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 788 - Water Use in History
    Since ancient times, human ingenuity has enabled humans to adapt to life even in hostile environments. The most important factor was successful management of the available water resources for agriculture, urban supply, and industry. Starting in the third millennium BCE, this course uses case studies from Asia and Europe to explore the hydraulic technologies employed, and to assess past and present social, political, economic, and environmental implications of water management and mismanagement.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 789 - British Society since 1939
    This course examines the development of British society and culture from 1939 to the present day. We discuss the Second World War as the "People's War" before turning to social and cultural developments in postwar Britain, particularly affluence and consumerism, immigration and questions of national identity, the rise of youth cultures and popular music, Thatcherism, and contemporary society since New Labour's "New Britain."
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: HIS 783
  • HST 802 - The Second World War
    This war rightly has been called a total war. New technologies and strategies affected civilians as much as the military, and the fighting raged across the globe. We examine the war in Europe, Asia, and beyond, exploring such questions as the role of aerial bombing, of science, of intelligence, and of propaganda in the conflagration while considering the war's impact on daily life in occupied countries, and the distinct experience of the dictatorships and democracies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 807 - The Canadian Revolution: Canada 1968-2000
    Canada has undergone such profound social, cultural, constitutional, and political changes since 1968 that it can be argued that the country has experienced a "revolution." The goal of this course is to examine the nature of this "revolution" and to give students a broad introduction to the major events and themes in contemporary Canadian history, including such topics as constitutional reform, multiculturalism, Quebec, free trade, cultural organizations, foreign policy, globalization, feminism, and Aboriginal rights.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • HST 811 - The Holocaust
    This course provides an in-depth study of the Holocaust and an exploration of the major areas of historical inquiry that surround this watershed event. Students explore the roots of antisemitism, the Nazi rise to power, the nature of Nazi racial ideology, non-Jewish victim groups targeted for persecution, the motives of Nazi perpetrators, the experiences of the victims, issues of rescue and resistance, and the responses of governments and international organizations. Students will also consider the legacy of the Holocaust and contemporary genocide issues.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL