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Detail of coloured chalk pastel portrait drawing of Christina Rossetti by her brother Dante Gabriel Rossetti 1866

COVE Digital Edition of Christina Rossetti's "Goblin Market"

 

Co-editors: Lorraine Janzen Kooistra and Antony H. Harrison (North Carolina State University)

Editorial Team: Mary Arseneau (U Ottawa), Alison Chapman (U Victoria), Margaret Linley (Simon Fraser U), Emma Mason (U Warwick), and Richard Menke (U Georgia)


 

The “Goblin Market” edition is forthcoming in peer-reviewed digital format under the aegis of The COVE, or The Central Online Victorian Educator, of which Co-PI Lorraine Janzen Kooistra is a founding member. An international initiative, The COVE aims to create a sustainable infrastructure for scholarly publication, thus countering the pressures on academic and commercial presses only to publish Victorian material that will sell over 300 copies.  The COVE seeks to make freely available to the public all work that undergoes peer review, with that work put through copy-editing of equal or superior quality to that currently offered by print presses.  Lorraine hopes to introduce Ryerson students to the COVE annotation tool and the creation of scholarly digital editions in her W2018 classes. Meanwhile, she is overseeing two COVE RAs working on online editing processes.

Co-editors Janzen Kooistra and Harrison hope to launch the COVE edition of “Goblin Market” in December 2018. The title poem of Christina Rossetti’s first commercially published collection of poetry, Goblin Market and Other Poems (Macmillan, 1862), “Goblin Market” has always delighted, perplexed, and inspired readers. A poetic fairytale expressed in deceptively simple form, and imbued with Pre-Raphaelite sensuality and spiritual symbolism, “Goblin Market” met its first public with two introductory illustrations designed by Rossetti’s brother, the artist Dante Gabriel. This edition of “Goblin Market” aims to present the poem in all the layered complexities of its production and reception and to illuminate the interpretive cruxes of the poem as these have been addressed by scholars and critics from the Victorian to the digital age. Its online audience will include students, scholars, and interested citizens around the world.

 

Project Website: COVE (Central Online Victorian Educator) Ed. Dino Felluga, Purdue University

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