Skip to main content
Ted Rogers School of Management - Ryerson University hands with leaf Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility

Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility

Increase Text Size
Decrease Text Size
 Change Text Size 

Events

Professor Ben Bradshaw (University of Guelph) speaks to "Indigenous Consent in the Canadian Mining Context" on December 11, 2015  

Theresa Hollett (Nunatsiavut Government) speaks to "Indigenous Consent in the Canadian Mining Context" on December 11, 2015 
 

Tomas Frederiksen (University of Manchester) gives a presentation at Ryerson on mining and CSR in Africa, October 22, 2014.

John Kielty speaks on "Managing Community and Environmental Impacts During the Mining Construction Phase," October 20, 2014.

Jeff Geipel (Engineers without Borders) and Kevin D’Souza (Centerra Gold) speak on "Procurement as a Means for Mining Firms to Secure Their Social License to Operate," on October 9, 2014. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian

Bernd Christmas discusses the recent Tsilhqot'in and Keewatin decisions of the Supreme Court of Canada, and their implications for Aboriginals and sustainable economic development in Canada, on September 22, 2014.  

Witold Henisz discusses Corporate Diplomacy: Building the External Stakeholder-Reputation Relationship, on September 8, 2014.

Dante Pesce discusses "Latin America, CSR & Standards: A Chilean Perspective" on May 27, 2014. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.

Ryerson hosts conference "Where to from here: A Canadian Strategy for Implementing the UN Principles on Business and Human Rights?" on May 8th, 2014. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.  

Sir Mark Moody-Stuart speaks on "Corrupt and autocratic countries: to engage or to withdraw and isolate?" Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.

Penelope Simons (University of Ottawa) speaks on "The Governance Gap: Extractive Industries, Human Rights and the Home State Advantage" with co-speaker Audrey Macklin. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.  

Audrey Macklin (University of Toronto) speaks on "The Governance Gap: Extractive Industries, Human Rights and the Home State Advantage" with co-speaker Penelope Simons. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.

Claire Woodside, Director of Publish What You Pay-Canada, speaks on “Resource Revenue Transparency:  The Emerging Canadian Approach”  with co-speaker Ross Gallinger. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.

Ross Gallinger, Executive Director of Prospectors and Developers Association Canada (PDAC), speaks on “Resource Revenue Transparency:  The Emerging Canadian Approach” with co-speaker Claire Woodside. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.  

Janet Fishlock from rePlan speaks to Mining-Indigenous experiences in Canada, Africa and Central America, on March 24, 2014. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.

Simon Chorley speaks at the UNICEF & Extractive Sector and CSR talk, on March 17, 2014. Photo credit: Sasan Ghanadian.

Chris Ford speaks on "What Contributes to Corporate Responsibility Success in the Resource Development Sector?" January 20, 2014. Photo by Sasan Ghanadian.

Robert Merwin speaks at the "Ontario’s new Mining Act regime-the Ontario-Aboriginal Interface" event, January 10, 2014. Photo by Zaker Khan.

Sustainable Procurement talk-Ryerson CSR Institute-Nov14-2016-JohnKielty&EmilyNickerson-photo by Sasan Ghanadian

Mr. Sandy Boucher, Whistleblowing Systems, Nov. 21, 2016

<br _rte_temp_br="brEOB">

<br>

Upcoming Ryerson CSR Institute Events  

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to provide a number of CSR-related speaking/learning events (below). These events are variously co-sponsored or otherwise involve a number of other fine organizations and entities, as is noted below. More are planned. To receive email updates, send an email with “subscribe” in the subject heading to:  kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

 

Ryerson University CSR Institute Talk: “Law’s Sponsorship of Corporate Irresponsibility” – Friday, October 27, 2017, 12pm to 2pm

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR Institute) is pleased to present a talk by Professor Harry Glasbeek entitled “Law’s sponsorship of corporate irresponsibility”, from 12 noon to 2 pm on Friday, October 27, 2017 at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West,

Toronto, in room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor). This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson

CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association. This event is supported by the CSA Group and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://RyersonCSR-Institute-corporate-irresponsibility.eventbrite.com

About the Event:

There is much public criticism of recurrent failures to hold major corporations, their owners and senior executives to account for the many wrongfully inflicted harms their conduct inflicts. It offends both our political and legal value systems. Outside the corporate sphere, law is intent on holding those who benefit from activities they control responsible for the outcomes of those activities for example, liquor licensees’ liability for their patrons’ wrongdoing; churches for their misbehaving clergy. How has it come about that a different set of rules apply in the corporate sphere? A non-technical exposition as to the way in which law has constituted our most important economic vehicle, the for-profit corporation, to make it (i), difficult for us to use our normal rules and (ii), invite those in control of corporations to act heedlessly toward others, will be offered. This cannot be justified, neither conceptually, nor morally. Frequently a counter-argument is used to justify this different legal treatment of corporate actors. It is that, in the end, corporate exceptionalism benefits us all. That argument is an empirical one. Evidence will be offered to show that the extent and quality of welfare created by allowing entrepreneurs to use the corporation are vastly exaggerated and that the harms done by the use of this vehicle are seriously underestimated. A recommendation as to what can be done to bring the treatment of corporate actors into line with the way in which all other citizens are expected to behave will be proffered.  Essentially it calls for controlling shareholders to abide by the Canadian values and norms they are often heard to urge the rest of us to respect and honour.

About the Speaker:

Harry Glasbeek, B.A., LL.B. (Hons.) University of Melbourne, JD (Chicago), Professor Emeritus and Senior Scholar, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, has taught at the universities of Melbourne and Monash in Australia, and the University of Western Ontario in Canada. From 1974 to 1996 he was a Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School. After retirement, until 2013, he spent 6 months of the year as a visitor and Adjunct Professor at Victoria University. He has written books on Australian labour law and Australian evidence law, on Canadian labour law and Canadian evidence law, as well as more than 130 articles on tort law, labour law, Bills of Rights, legal education, corporate law, corporate criminality, corporate social responsibility and occupational health and safety. His last book, the eleventh, is Class Privilege: how law shelters shareholders and coddles capitalism, Toronto: Between the Lines, 2017. His forthcoming book is Capitalism: A Crime Story (2018, Between the Lines).

 

Ryerson University CSR Institute Talk: “Canada's Experience with the OECD Multinational Enterprise Guidelines and National Contact Point” – Wednesday, October 11, 2017 – 12pm to 2pm

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a talk on “Canada's Experience with the OECD Multinational Enterprise Guidelines and National Contact Point,” from 12 noon to 2 pm on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-119 (ninth floor). 

Speaker Duane McMullen, of Global Affairs Canada will discuss the origins and evolution of the Guidelines, Canada's involvement in them, the NCP process, and Canada's experience with implementation. This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: www.ryerson-csr-institute-OECD-National-Contact-Point.eventbrite.com

About the Event:

Canada's National Contact Point promotes the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises‎ (OECD MNE Guidelines) and is responsible for dealing with issues that arise with their implementation. This can, and has, resulted in some complex and challenging cases. Both in Canada and when operating abroad, companies can face significant consequences if they do not approach issues early and if best practices are not applied above and beyond the law. Canada has the tools and resources in place to advise on those best practices and to respond if issues do arise. Duane McMullen, the Chair of Canada's National Contact Point, will describe how the National Contact Point handles cases, attempts to bring parties together to reach agreement to resolve issues and  how Canada's National Contact Point fits within the Government of Canada's broader policy on Corporate Social Responsibility abroad.

About the Speaker:

Duane McMullen is Director General, Trade Commissioner Service Operations and Trade Strategy, Global Affairs Canada.  He is is currently the Chair of Canada’s National Contact Point. He has previously lead Canada's commercial programs in China and Korea and worked in the office of the Deputy Minister of International Trade in Ottawa. Duane McMullen won the Minister of International Trade award in 1999, the Clerk of the Privy Council award in 2003 and the 2012 Ken Sunquist Award for Excellence in International Trade. He is a graduate of Queen's University in Engineering Physics.

 

Ryerson University CSR Institute Talk: “The Changing Landscape of Corporate Disclosure: Why CSR Reporting Matters” – Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 12pm to 2pm

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a panel discussion on “The Changing Landscape of Corporate Disclosure: Why CSR Reporting Matters,” from 12 noon to 2 pm on Wednesday, October 4, 2017 at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-109 (ninth floor).  The purpose of this session is to review some of the key elements of corporate reporting as practiced in 2017, as well as developments, impacts and challenges associated with CSR reporting in 2017. This event is co-sponsored by the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), Stakeholder Research Associates (SRA), the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: www.ryerson-csr-institute-corp-sus-reporting.eventbrite.com

About the Event:

Whether referred to as corporate social responsibility, corporate responsibility, or corporate sustainability, the practice of firms committing to address environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues, and reporting on performance, is increasingly become a mainstream preoccupation.  More than 9000 firms have committed to the 10 sustainability principles of the UN Global Compact.  More than 80 countries have adopted the ISO 26000 social responsibility standard as a national standard (including Canada).  It has been reported that 74% of the largest global companies now use the Global Reporting Initiative’s process for tracking and reporting their sustainability performance. A number of other reporting standards and initiatives have also emerged across the globe. In addition to some individual countries moving to adopt a mandatory non-financial reporting approach for their corporate sectors, the EU has now put in place a directive requiring non-financial reporting by large firms headquartered in EU member countries. 

CSR reporting has changed significantly since it was first introduced over twenty years ago as a means for companies to communicate their CSR policies. While over 65% of Canada’s largest companies report on their non-financial performance, Canada still lags within the context of global reporting, and smaller and medium-sized companies have not kept pace with their larger counterparts.

This panel will discuss the latest research re: corporate reporting in Canada, macro trends concerning reporting standards, and specific ways that companies are using the GRI Standards, connections to the legal framework, and the impacts that reporting is having on how companies work with stakeholder and organizations within their supply chain.

About the Speakers:

Alyson Genovese, Head of Corporate & Stakeholder Relations, USA & Canada, Global Reporting Initiative-- With more than 20 years of corporate and non-profit sector experience in corporate social responsibility, public affairs, corporate citizenship, sustainability communications and stakeholder engagement, Alyson has worked as an internal executive, a freelance consultant and a trusted advisor.

Katie Fedosenko, Senior Communications and Reporting Specialist, Teck Resources Ltd. -- Katie has worked in communications at Teck since 2013 and is currently responsible for managing Teck’s annual sustainability report. She got her start in the mining industry in Australia, working with Rio Tinto on communications about their reclamation programs. Katie holds a BA from the University of British Columbia and was recently named one of Green Biz’s 30 Under 30.

Kathrin Bohr, Senior Partner, Stakeholder Research Associates (SRA) – With a degree in Business & Sustainability from the Schulich School of Business, Kathrin has over 15 years experience working in the field of CSR and Sustainability and has supported many leading Canadian and international companies in establishing and improving their reporting practices. She is GRI certified and developed the first GRI training for the Chinese market.

Kernaghan Webb (LLB., LLM., LLD.), Associate Professor, Ted Rogers School of Management and Director of the CSR Institute, Ryerson University – Working with intergovernmental, governmental, private sector and civil society organizations, Dr. Webb has extensive experience developing and implementing innovative approaches to regulation, and has written and published widely on this subject, with his work cited and followed by the Supreme Court of Canada and recognized by the Standards Council of Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: www.ryerson-csr-institute-corp-sus-reporting.eventbrite.com

To be included or removed from the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with "subscribe" or “unsubscribe” in the subject heading.
 

 

Human Rights Defenders (HRDs): Multistakeholder Statement of Support for HRDs – Invitation to Participate – Friday, Sept 29, 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (Ryerson CSR Institute) invites all interested individuals and organizations to participate in a discussion facilitated by the Ryerson CSR Institute concerning development and online publication of a Multistakeholder Statement of Support for Human Rights Defenders, that will take place on Friday, Sept. 29, from 1:30 pm to 3 pm.  Participation can be in person (the meeting is in Ottawa, in the  offices of Global Affairs Canada, located at 125 Sussex Avenue, Ottawa -- please bring photo ID), or by teleconference (1-877-413-4788) toll free Cda/USA: conf ID: 2970658). Although there is no cost for participating, if you are interested in participating (in person or by teleconference), please register here.

Details concerning in-person participation, teleconference participation, the draft Multistakeholder Statement of Support, and further background information is found here.

The Ryerson CSR Institute wishes to thank Global Affairs Canada for providing the meeting facilities and teleconference arrangements.

Quick Summary:

Around the world, those who speak out on human rights issues and act to promote and protect human rights (human rights defenders, or HRDs) play a vital role in bringing public attention to potentially problematic activities. Unfortunately, HRDs continue to face attempts to suppress or intimidate their voice when they publicly make known a potentially problematic human rights issue. Governments have a primordial duty to protect human rights, and as part of this, a duty to protect those who may be the subject of unacceptable acts of suppression when they speak out on potentially problematic human rights practices. In this regard, in December 2016, the Government of Canada published Voices at Risk, a policy guidance document for officials at Canadian missions abroad and at Headquarters.‎

But individuals and organs of the private sector and civil society are also often in a position where they can act to support HRDs and their activities, and it is increasingly accepted that businesses have a responsibility to respect human rights in all their activities and relationships. The immediate purpose of the Multistakeholder Statement of Support for Human Rights Defenders is to provide an opportunity for private sector, civil society actors (and governments) with an opportunity to publicly express their non-partisan constructive support -- on the neutral, accessible Ryerson CSR Institute online platform -- for the work of HRDs, and to indicate their willingness to assist in developing further guidance so that HRDs everywhere can operate without threats of violence or other unacceptable acts of suppression.

Beyond development and publication of this statement and an opportunity for parties to express support for the statement, there may be value in the Ryerson CSR Institute creating a nonpartisan forum for private sector and civil society actors to come together (with or without governments) to explore in greater detail the issues associated with HRDs, to discuss how to support HRDs and to develop broad-based all-sector-wide good practice guidance for support of HRDs. If there is interest and need for same, the Ryerson CSR Institute is prepared to take on this role. 

The talk concerning development and publication of the Multistakeholder Statement of Support for Human Rights Defenders will take place on Friday, Sept. 29, from 1:30 pm to 3 pm. Participation can be in person (the meeting is in Ottawa, in the offices of Global Affairs Canada, located at 125 Sussex Avenue, Ottawa -- please bring photo ID), or by teleconference (1-877-413-4788) toll free Cda/USA: conf ID: 2970658).  Although there is no cost for participating, if you are interested in participating (in person or by teleconference), please register here.

Details concerning in-person participation, teleconference participation, the draft Multistakeholder Statement of Support, and further background information is found here.
 

 

Ryerson CSR Institute talk: CSR in the Caribbean Commonwealth: a Multi-Level Analysis - August 18, 2017, 12 noon to 2 pm

A recording of this event is accessible at: https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/Watch/11623.aspx

Dr. Emily Gaynor Dick-Forde’s PowerPoint presentation

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a talk by Dr. Emily Gaynor Dick-Forde entitled “CSR in the Caribbean Commonwealth: a Multi-Level Analysis” from 12 noon to 2 pm on Friday, August 18, 2017 at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor).

Experience suggests that each region has unique economic, social and environmental characteristics, and these distinctive contextual attributes strongly influence the nature of CSR that is developed and practiced in that region. And interestingly, the Canadian financial sector and other sectors have considerable presence in the area. We have much to learn from the Commonwealth Caribbean, and Dr. Dick-Forde is well positioned to guide us in this learning.

This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association. This event is supported by the Canadian Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://ryerson-univ-csr-institute-caribbean-csr-talk.eventbrite.com

About the Talk

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) can be characterized as a movement for social change in so far as it promotes responsible leadership, good governance and comprehensive accountability for a firm’s social, economic and environmental impacts on society (local community and nation). Additionally, a socially responsible corporation pursuing CSR is likely to strategically assess and mitigate for risks, including risk from climate change and to support the achievement of sustainable development in the nations where it conducts business. The investigation of such a broadly defined CSR requires a context sensitive approach to uncover the enabling and hindering variables to authentic approaches to CSR. This talk is intended to provide insights and theoretical advances drawing on a novel and appropriate philosophical approach to guide CSR research as practiced in the Commonwealth Caribbean.

The Caribbean economy has distinctive economic activities spanning such subjects as food and beverage production, tourism, and resource extraction, all of which have significant economic, social and environmental impacts, on local communities and beyond. The methodology of Prophetic Pragmatism developed by Cornel West (1989, 1993) is employed given its emphasis on context and on multiple levels of investigations, intended to inform the critical and contextual analysis on social and environmental issues that is undertaken for this talk. For both comparative and methodological insights, this talk should be of interest to CSR researchers and practitioners in Canada and to the Ryerson University CSR Institute’s international audience. Additionally, government officials, civil society organizations and the academic community should find the study thought-provoking.

About the Speaker

Dr. Emily Gaynor Dick-Forde is an accounting and governance expert, with over 24 years experience as an accounting academic. Emily was appointed a Government Senator and Minister of Planning, Housing & the Environment in the Government of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago (2007-2010) under the leadership of Mr. Patrick Manning. In this role she was appointed Governor for Trinidad and Tobago to the Inter-American Development Bank and to the Caribbean Development Bank. Emily has delivered conferences and seminars on, inter alia, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), Corporate Governance and Financial Crises, Ethical Leadership, Climate Change and Education in the Caribbean, Sustainable Development Goals and Social Security, Strategic Management Accounting and Environmental issues at events such as the Commonwealth Heads of Government Business Forum, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) Annual Meeting 2009, the Institute of Chartered Accountants of the Caribbean Conferences 2006 and 2012, and at numerous other academic and professional conferences.

Emily is currently the Manager of Special Initiatives in the Office of the Principal, at the University of the West Indies Open Campus. Emily holds a Ph.D. in Accounting (CSR) from the University of Dundee, Scotland, a Masters degree in Finance from the University of Cambridge England and a BSc Accounting (with First Class Honours) from The University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus. Emily is a Certified Management Accountant with the Society of Management Accountants of Canada, now the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada. She has published journal articles and a book chapter on corporate social and environmental responsibility, Climate Change, Management Accounting, and management and culture. Her research in progress includes a paper on Responsible Governance of Credit Unions, Internal Controls and Internal Audit in the Caribbean Public Sector and a book on true governance. Emily is a scholarship winner with the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust, the Association of Commonwealth Universities and the University of Dundee, Scotland (International Student Scholarship). She is a Fellow of the Chartered Professional Accountants of Canada and a Fellow of the Cambridge Commonwealth Trust. Emily is married and has three children.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://ryerson-univ-csr-institute-caribbean-csr-talk.eventbrite.com

To be included or removed from the Ryerson CSR Institute event email

list, please email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with "subscribe" or “unsubscribe” in the subject heading.

 

 

 

 

Ryerson CSR Institute talk:Mining Conflicts & the Catholic Church: Exploring the Connections-Frday, July 7, 12 - 2pm

A recording of this event is accessible at:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/Watch/11518.aspx

Here is the presentation of  Jim Cooney

Mining Conflicts and the Catholic Church: Exploring the Connections

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a talk by Jim Cooney entitled “Mining Conflicts and the Catholic Church: Exploring the Connections” from 12 noon to 2 pm on Friday July 7th at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-109 (ninth floor).  This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Canadian Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-conflict-Catholic.eventbrite.com

 

About the Talk

Over the past twenty years, the mining industry has made significant advances in practices of engaging with communities and addressing their environmental, social and economic (ESE) concerns, within the comprehensive framework of sustainable development. Nevertheless, complaints by communities and their Catholic Church-based allies about mining projects have not perceptibly diminished. The roots of such conflicts appear to lie deeper than the concern of responsible mining companies to address ESE issues in the areas impacted by their operations. Corporate social responsibility as practiced by mining companies appears to be falling short of meeting the expectations of Christian social justice as advocated by the Church. In his 2015 Papal Encyclical Laudato Si’ (“On Care for Our Common Home”), Pope Francis examined the issues around mining from the perspective of the “integrity of creation”: the interconnectedness of all things, animate and inanimate: all humans, all other living things, all minerals and metals, all solids, liquids and gases. In this talk, the speaker will examine the Encyclical for its relevance to the sorts of ESE issues associated with mining and the guidance that it provides towards anticipating and reducing conflict.

 

About the Speaker

Jim Cooney has worked for over forty years in the international mining industry, initially for six years with Cominco Ltd. (now Teck Resources) and then for twenty-five years with Placer Dome Inc., where he retired in 2006 following the acquisition of that company by Barrick Gold and Goldcorp. During the past ten years he has acted as an advisor to a number of international mining companies on issues around sustainable development, corporate social responsibility and the social license to operate. He has lectured as Adjunct Professor at the Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining Engineering, University of British Columbia, and as Adjunct Professor at the Beedie School of Business, Simon Fraser University. He is also Professor of Practice in Global Governance at the Institute for the Study of International Development (ISID), McGill University. 

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend.

Register here: http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-conflict-Catholic.eventbrite.com

For those who plan on "patching in" for the live broadcast, from 12 noon to 2 pm, on July 7 (by clicking on the following link:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/live/1664.aspx ), if you have a question or comment, please email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca . Whether we will be able to include your question or comment will depend on circumstances beyond our control, but we will do our best!

Future planned talks (Fall, 2017) pertain to the evolving situation with respect to global reporting (focusing on the Global Reporting Initiative), how CSR is being integrated into the supply chain, and Canadian approaches to addressing the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). More information will be posted on these and ohter events in due course.

To be included or removed from the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with "subscribe" or “unsubscribe” in the subject heading.

To access recordings of previous recent CSR Institute talks, go to:  http://www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute/ (box on bottom of page). 

 

"The role of revenue transparency in combating corruption, promoting accountability and enhancing resource-based development": May 19

A recording of this event is accessible at:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/112/Watch/11423.aspx

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a panel discussion on "The role of revenue transparency in combating corruption, promoting accountability and enhancing resource-based development," on Friday, May 19, 2017, from 12 noon to 2 pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-129 (ninth floor).  Governments, the private sector and civil society have variously developed initiatives and instruments designed to increase revenue transparency focusing especially on the extractive sector, on the understanding that enhanced transparency will increase institutional accountability and ultimately result in improvements in overall welfare.  But do the early results of these instruments and initiatives live up to the promise? Given the experience and diverse perspectives of the panelists (see below), they are well positioned to comment on the evolving nature of these instruments and initiatives, as well as the challenges and opportunities associated with them. 

 

This event is part of a SSHRC supported research project, and is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Canadian Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here:

http://ryerson-csrinstitute-transparency.eventbrite.com

 

About the Panelists

Laurence Cockcroft has played leading roles in the development and expansion of Transparency International as one of the top NGOs devoted to anti-corruption, and is the author of ‘Global Corruption : Money, Power and Ethics’ (2012) and 'Unmasked: Corruption in the West' (2016, with Anne Christine Wegener). 

Ed Opitz is the Vice President, Safety and Sustainability at Kinross Gold Corporation, with experience in project evaluation, permitting, operations, and/or closure at more than 40 precious metal mine operations and projects in ten countries dealing with issues such as tailings management, water balances and reclamation to workforce safety, public consultations, indigenous peoples and community foundations.

Dr. Hevina Dashwood is a Professor at Brock University whose current research program encompasses natural resource governance in the extractive sector, with a focus on Canadian and global multistakeholder CSR initiatives, including examining partnerships in mining-affected communities in West Africa, and a collaborative research project looking at the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) and its implementation at the local community level in Ghana and Nigeria.

Dr. Uwafiokun Idemudia is an Associate Professor in York University's Department of Social Science, with research interests in the area of critical development studies, political economy and political ecology approaches to natural resource extraction in developing countries, business and development, issues of governance, transparency and accountability in resource rich African countries, and the relationship between development and conflict as well as environmental security. 

Dr. Kernaghan Webb is an Associate Professor in the Law and Business Department at Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management, whose research, writing and teaching focuses on innovative approaches to regulation involving government, the private sector and civil society, with his work largely informed by his practical involvement as chair, co-chair, member of or advisor to many public and private committees, groups and organizations involved in innovative rule development and implementation to address environmental, social and economic issues. 

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend.

Register here:

http://ryerson-csrinstitute-transparency.eventbrite.com

To be included or removed from the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with "subscribe" or “unsubscribe” in the subject heading.

"Good Faith, Honesty and the Bhasin v. Hrynew Decision:  Where to From Here?": April 28

A recording of this event is accessible at:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/112/Watch/11409.aspx

Here is the presentation of Daniele Bertolini

Daniele Bertolini "Session One" Bhasin discussion

Daniele Bertolini "Session Two" Bhasin implications 

Here is the presentation of Andrea Bolieiro

Andrea Bolieiro "Session One" Bhasin discussion

Here is the presentation of Angela Swan

Angela Swan "Session One" Bhasin discussion

Here is the presentation of Kernaghan Webb

Kernaghan Webb "Session Two" Bhasin-CSR-law implications

 

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to be a co-sponsor for a special workshop (no cost) exploring the concepts of "good faith" and "honesty" in contractual performance, drawing on a recent Supreme Court of Canada decision that discussed these concepts. The workshop will be held on Friday, April 28, 2017 at TRSM, from 8:30 am to 2 pm (lunch included).  Full information concerning the workshop is provided below. 

This event is the brainchild of the Law and Business Department at Ryerson University, with Ryerson CSR Institute support.  Law and CSR are often heavily intertwined, and the subject matter of this workshop is a good example of this. While many of the panelists are "black letter law" types, at least one of the panelists will be speaking specifically on the connection between the law of contract and corporate social responsibility.  Although there is no cost to attend the workshop, seating is limited.  Register here: 

http://ryerson-good-faith-honesty.eventbrite.com

For those who cannot attend in person, arrangements are being made for this workshop to be livecast, and a video archive of the workshop will be accessible after the event. 

Full information about the workshop is provided below

 

"Good Faith, Honesty and the Bhasin v. Hrynew Decision:  Where to From Here?"

The Law and Business Department of Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, supported by the organizations listed below, is pleased to present a workshop exploring the implications of the 2014 Supreme Court of Canada decision, Bhasin v. Hrynew, entitled: "Good Faith, Honesty and the Bhasin v. Hrynew Decision:  Where to From Here?"  The workshop features two panels of legal experts (details below) and will be held from 8:30 am to 12:45 pm (lunch to follow) on Friday, April 28, 2017, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of
Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-109 (ninth floor).  

In the Bhasin v. Hrynew decision, the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that there is a common law "duty to act honestly" in the performance of contractual obligations, and that "good faith" is an "organizing principle" of the common law of contract. A major objective of the workshop is to explore the practical implications of this decision. 

This event is supported by the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Governance Association and the Ryerson CSR Student Association.

Refreshments and lunch will be served.  Although there is no cost for attending the workshop, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here:

http://ryerson-good-faith-honesty.eventbrite.com

Agenda:

8:30 - 9:00 am -- Onsite distribution of namecards, refreshments and registration

9:00 - 10:30 am -- Panel One: Unpacking the Bhasin v. Hrynew decision (panelists: Daniele Bertolini, Andrea Bolieiro, Robin Schwill, and Angela Swan). Speaker info below.

10:30 - 11:00 am -- Health Break, Refreshments

11:00 am - 12:45 pm -- Panel Two: Future Implications of Bhasin (panelists: Daniele Bertolini, Russell Groves, Samaneh Hosseini, Yonni Fushman and Kernaghan Webb). Speaker info below.

12:45 - 2 pm -- Lunch and Networking

2 pm: Conclusion of workshop

About the Speakers

Daniele Bertolini is an Assistant Professor at Ryerson University’s Department of Law & Business, with a particular interest in contract law.

Andrea Bolieiro, of Pape Barristers Professional Corporation, has a broad litigation practice covering a wide range of legal topics, and has appeared before all levels of court in Ontario, including multiple appearances at the Court of Appeal.

Yonni Fushman is Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Aecon Group Inc. and is the 2016-2017 vice chair of the OBA Construction and Infrastructure Law Section.

Russell Groves is an associate with the firm Filion Wakely Thorup Angeletti, who practises in all areas of labour and employment law.

Samaneh Hosseini is a partner in the Litigation Group of the Toronto office of Stikeman Elliott, whose practice focuses on commercial litigation including complex contract disputes, class actions, securities litigation, shareholder disputes and product liability.

Robin Schwill is a partner at Davies Ward Phillips & Vineberg LLP in the Financial Restructuring & Insolvency practice, providing advice regarding corporate turnarounds, work-outs and restructurings; distressed asset sales and acquisitions; debtor-in-possession financings; secured and unsecured creditor rights enforcement; and all facets of Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act and Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act proceedings.

Angela Swan is counsel to the firm Aird & Berlis as well as a member of its Corporate/Commercial Group and the Legal Education Department, and was previously a partner at Aird & Berlis and an associate at a national firm in Montreal.

Kernaghan Webb is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Law and Business Department (F2017-W2018) and Director of the Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management.

Although there is no cost for attending the workshop, seating is limited, and you must register to attend.

Register here:

http://ryerson-good-faith-honesty.eventbrite.com

 

State & Non-state Regulatory Innovations: Learning from Conflict Minerals-Wednesday, March 8, 2017

A recording of this event is accessible at:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/Watch/11265.aspx

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social
Responsibility is pleased to present a talk by Mora Johnson, Former
Chair of the OECD Forum on Responsible Mineral Supply Chains on “State
& Non-state Regulatory Innovations: Learning from Conflict Minerals”
on Wednesday, March 8, 2017, from 12 noon to 2 pm, at Ryerson
University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto,
in room TRS 3-119 (ninth floor). Mora's talk focusses on lessons
learned from efforts to address global
mineral supply chains financing armed conflict and/or associated with
serious human rights abuses.

This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the
Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and
Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Canadian
Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner
Service of Global Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited,
and you must register to attend. Register here:
http://ryersoncsr-state-nonstatereg.eventbrite.com

About the Event

The ability to regulate problematic cross-border activity represents a
significant challenge for state-based legal systems: it is difficult
for states and others to develop and implement important social and
environmental standards intended to operate cross-jurisdictionally.
Governance gaps can be acute in complex global supply chains that
cross multiple jurisdictions, particularly those with weak governance.
Minerals pillaged by armed groups in the Eastern Democratic Republic
of the Congo financed a lengthy conflict, posing special challenges
for concerted international action, including an absence of state
control and criminalized trade at key parts of the supply chain.

Ms. Johnson’s presentation begins with a review of the situation in
the Congo and international responses to conflict minerals entering
the global marketplace, as well as various standards and governance
structures that arose rapidly after 2009.  She then provides lessons
for current efforts to regulate corporations abroad, and address
serious problems in supply chains such as slavery and child labour.
Approaches which draw on a combination of state and non-state actors,
instruments, processes and institutions seem to have considerable
potential to address global governance challenges of this nature.

About the Speaker


Mora Johnson is a lawyer and consultant with almost 20 years’
experience in international, government, private and non-profit
sectors.  She worked for over 10 years at Global Affairs Canada and
then Natural Resources Canada in negotiating and implementing
regulatory and voluntary standards relating to transparency and
business practices in the extractive sector. She advised on standards
such as the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights, the
Voluntary Principles, and the Extractive Industries Transparency
Initiative.  She served as Head of the Canadian delegation to the OECD
Working Group on Bribery, and later to the OECD Forum on Responsible
Supply Chains.  In 2011, she was elected to co-chair the negotiation
process of a Conflict Gold Standard at the OECD, and from 2012-2015
was elected to Chair the OECD Forum on Responsible Supply Chains.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited,
and you must register to attend.

Register here:
http://ryersoncsr-state-nonstatereg.eventbrite.com

Or contact Dr. Kernaghan Webb - kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

To be included on the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please
email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with “subscribe” in the subject
heading.

To be removed from the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please
email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with “unsubscribe” in the subject
heading.

 

The Resource Curse & What Firms Can Do About It-Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 12 noon to 2 pm

A recording of this event is accessible at:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/Watch/11259.aspx

Here is the presentation of Robert Boutilier

The Natural Resources Curse and What Firms Can Do About It: A PNG Case Study

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social
Responsibility is pleased to present a talk by Dr. Robert Boutilier
entitled “The Resource Curse and What Firms Can Do About It:  A Papua
New Guinea Case Study” on Tuesday, March 7, 2017, from 12 noon to 2
pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas
West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-119 (ninth floor).  This event is
co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson
Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business
Student Association.  This event is supported by the Canadian
Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global
Affairs Canada.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited,
and you must register to attend.

Register here:
http://ryersoncsr-resourcecurse.eventbrite.com

About the Event

The natural resource curse hypothesis conditionally connects national
dependence on natural resource revenues to both declines in democracy
and slow economic growth. The literature based on nation states as the
unit of analysis has converged on the importance of weak institutions
in permitting corruption and fostering rent seeking, both of which
hurt national economic growth and impair democratic accountability.
This presentation looks at how the same dynamics present themselves in
daily events at mining project sites and what project managers have
tried to do to prevent the curse from taking root in mining
communities. The curse-inducing processes are illustrated by looking
at the curse related events throughout the life cycle of Placer Dome’s
Misima Mine in Papua New Guinea. The case highlights the need to take
account of the interactions among institutions at multiple levels of
jurisdiction and the importance of traditional or indigenous
institutions in protecting both formal and informal contracts and
property rights. The case also suggests some practical steps resource
companies can take, in the name of CSR, to help fortify institutions
against corruption and rent seeking. However, the findings of this
study, and the broader literature on corruption and rent seeking,
suggest that developing effective practical advice for companies will
require a concerted research effort over years if not decades. One
promising avenue for future research may be to understand how
countries with less corruption and rent seeking evolved to be so odd.
To that end, institution strengthening initiatives in Angola are
contrasted with the spontaneous emergence of strong institutions in
Botswana.

About the Speaker


Robert Boutilier specializes in developing strategies for gaining and
maintaining a social license, which usually involves doing most of the
things covered by CSR. He has conducted research projects and workshop
on stakeholder engagement and community relations in over 20 countries
and has measured the social license of over 50 mining projects. Dr.
Boutilier also studies the social license of the whole mining industry
and is a pioneer in modeling the socio-political dynamics swirling
around resource projects. Robert is an associate of the Centre for
Sustainable Community Development at Simon Fraser University,
Vancouver, and of the Australian Centre for Corporate Social
Responsibility, Melbourne. He has published three books and over a
dozen scholarly articles and book chapters on topics in issues
management, socio-economic development, social psychology, and
stakeholder relations.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited,
and you must register to attend.

Register here:
http://ryersoncsr-resourcecurse.eventbrite.com

Or contact Dr. Kernaghan Webb - kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

To be included on the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please
email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with “subscribe” in the subject
heading.

To be removed from the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please
email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with “unsubscribe” in the subject
heading.

 

Call for Papers: Exploring the role of corporate responsibility in shaping durable performance
May 3rd – 5th, 2017 in Pau, France

The Centre for Corporate Responsibility & Sustainable Development (CRSD) invites proposals for the 4th international symposium, to be held in the historic city of Pau, France.  It is jointly organized with The Institut de Recherche en Management et Pratiques d'Entreprise (IRMAPE) at École Supérieure de Commerce de Pau (ESC at Pau).

The symposium is open to business practitioners, researchers, PhD and other Post Graduate students, Post Docs, and participants from government and public institutions.  Please send submissions and enquiries to the Secretariat at ccrsd.org@gmail.com

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is proud to be a supporter of this symposium. The symposium seeks to explore the strategies of society's stakeholders as corporate bodies endowed with particular rights and responsibilities - business, government, multilateral organisations and third sector, and communities - and their collaborative arrangements for achieving a durable future. We are interested in how they shape (separately and collectively) durable performance as they juggle with the exigencies and priorities of our time (the search for acceptable frameworks for economic growth and social justice, in the context of contested resource constraints and opportunities, and cultural division), while at the same time reaching for shared, global, and elusive long term goals around sustainable development. We invite submissions that address this theme. Further information is available at www.cr-sd.org/symposium

 

The Rise in Mining Conflict: What Lies Beneath?-Tues.,
Dec 13, 12 noon-2pm

A recording of this event is accessible at:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/Watch/11018.aspx

Here is the presentation of Tony Andrews and Bernarda Elizalde 

The Rise in Conflict Associated With Mining: What Lies Beneath?

The research that is the basis for this talk can be found here 

http://cirdi.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Conflict-Full-Layout.pdf

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present “The Rise in Conflict Associated with Mining: What Lies Beneath?” on Tuesday, December 13, 2016, from 12 noon to 2 pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor). The talk represents an attempt to explore the root causes, systems and pathways associated with the rise in mining conflict around the world, based on Phase I of an extensive study on this topic supported by the Canadian International Resources and Development Institute (CIRDI). Studies and analysis of this type may form a basis for improved public policy and CSR approaches. The talk will be presented by Tony Andrews and Bernarda Elizalde, two of the lead researchers for this research initiative. This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Canadian Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner
Service of Global Affairs Canada.

This event is supported by the Canadian Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada. Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here:
http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-conflict.eventbrite.com

About the Event

Recent research suggests that conflict associated with mining operations worldwide has increased dramatically in the period 2002-2013. The global study that forms the basis for this talk delves beneath the surface manifestations of mining conflict to develop a deeper understanding of the nature of such conflicts and uncover root causes, systems and pathways. The underlying study involves a team of 12 specialists and is based on an integration of three different approaches including field investigations of 18 conflict case studies, primarily in Latin America and Africa, supported by a literature review and a compilation and analysis of existing global conflict incident databases. This presentation reports on Phase 1 of the project. Research to date suggests that conflict, which inevitably
manifests at the company-community interface, involves a much longer history and development than the conflict outbreak itself and implicates other important players. In particular, host governments play a central role in creating the enabling environment for conflict creation or prevention.  A conceptual model for conflict associated
with mining will be presented which is intended to assist in understanding conflict determinants, the players involved and their interrelationships. If followed, the belief is that this approach should assist those involved in conflict, including host governments,
companies, communities and civil society organizations, using what is hoped to be more effective preventive rather than reactive measures.

About the Speakers

Tony Andrews and Bernarda Elizalde are Principals and Co-Founders of the Centre for Responsible Mineral Development (RMD). Dr. Andrews is a geologist by training and a specialist in the application of responsible mineral development and social responsibility to natural resource development. Formerly, he was CEO of the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC).  Bernarda Elizalde is a recognized specialist in environmental stewardship and social responsibility applied to natural resource development, with 18 years of field experience across the Americas, working with mining companies, host governments, international institutions, indigenous peoples, communities and civil society organizations.Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited,
and you must register to attend. Register here:
http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-conflict.eventbrite.com

Or contact Dr. Kernaghan Webb - kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

To be included on the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with “subscribe” in the subject
heading.

To be removed from the Ryerson CSR Institute event email list, please
email kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca with “unsubscribe” in the subject
heading.

 

Ryerson CSR Institute talk: Whistleblowing Systems-A New Canadian Guide - Monday, November 21, 2016, 12 noon to 1:30 pm


A recording of this event is accessible at:

https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/Watch/10958.aspx

Here is the presentation on Whistleblowing Systems by Mr. Sandy Boucher

Here is the presentaion on CSA Standards Background Information, by Vanessa Mitchell, CSA Group

 

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is now also pleased to present a second talk, “Whistleblowing Systems: A New Canadian Guide," on the following Monday, November 21, 2016, from 12 noon to 1:30 pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-109 (ninth floor). The talk will discuss the new Canadian Standards Association Guide on Whistleblowing Systems. The presentation will be made by Mr. Sandy Boucher, of Grant Thornton, who was a co-convenor in the guide development process. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Canadian Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada. 

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-whistleblowing.eventbrite.com 

About the Event:

A recent study suggests a strong positive correlation between shareholder return and a “speak-up culture”, one in which people feel comfortable and safe raising their concerns
and ideas for improvement in the workplace. Whistleblowers are often a unique and indispensable resource for improving organizational effectiveness.  The purpose of this guide is to assist organizational leaders seeking to establish internal systems for handling reports of suspected wrongdoing, mismanagement, and unethical conduct in their organization. Reporting such suspicions is often called “whistleblowing”, and some international research suggests that reports from whistleblowers provide the most effective mechanism for detecting wrongdoing that can harm an organization. For reasons such as these, Canadian private and public organizations are increasingly looking for proactive ways to encourage whistleblowing and make appropriate use of information obtained in this way. This guide addresses the issues that experience has shown to be most critical in developing an effective whistleblowing system, including the challenge of protecting whistleblowers from reprisals that punish and silence them, and deter others from speaking out.

About the Speaker:

Mr. Sandy Boucher is a Senior Manager at Grant Thornton, a co-convenor of the CSA process for the development of Whistleblowing Systems -- A Guide, and is a specialist in fraud and corruption investigations, background due diligence enquiries, asset tracing and recovery, managing major investigations and security. Mr. Boucher works on detecting and preventing fraud and corruption and divides his time between investigating such cases and advising organizations on how to prevent them from occurring. He has led and conducted a wide range of investigations including a number of high level corruption probes and has testified around the globe in both civil & criminal courts. Sandy heads the Grant Thornton national investigative research, and anti-corruption practices.  Mr. Boucher has over 33 years of experience as an investigator including 12 with the Royal Hong Kong Police and 21 in the private sector.  He has been with Grant Thornton for seven years.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-whistleblowing.eventbrite.com

 

Ryerson CSR Institute talk: Sustainable Procurement -- 2 New Initiatives -- Nov. 14, 2016, 12 noon to 2 pm

A recording of this event is accessible at:
https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/Watch/10938.aspx

Here is a pdf of the first presentation concerning the ISO 20400 presentation by Dr. Kernaghan Webb

Here is a pdf of the second presentation concerning the EWB's transparency in local procurement initiative by Emily Nickerson and John Kielty

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present “Sustainable Procurement: Exploring 2 New Initiatives,”  on Monday, November 14, 2016, from 12 noon to 2 pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-119 (ninth floor). The talk will discuss the soon-to-be completed local procurement reporting initiative for the global mining industry developed by Engineers Without Borders Canada, and the soon-to-be published new ISO standard on sustainable procurement, ISO 20400.  This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.  This event is supported by the Canadian Standards Association and the Trade Commissioner Service of Global Affairs Canada. 

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-sustainable-procurement.eventbrite.com

About the Event:

In CSR circles and beyond, businesses are increasingly being evaluated not only for their own social and environmental performance, but also for the performance of their supply chain partners. The practice of firms attempting to "offload" unacceptable social/environmental behaviour by having it undertaken by suppliers or contractors is widely regarded as unacceptable.  Second, the procurement power of firms is now recognized as an important point of leverage to influence environmental and social performance of suppliers. In apparel, high tech products, food production, and other contexts, it is increasingly recognized that retail brands need to ensure that those who make their goods or services meet high environmental and social standards, so much so that the retail firms at the top of the supply chain may represent de facto regulators of such behaviour concerning their global supply chain partners. In extractive sector contexts, it is also increasingly accepted that the idea that mining or oil and gas or forestry companies can use their procurement powers to nurture new businesses in the communities where they operate, and thereby generate local employment opportunities, income and tax revenue.

Two new initiatives focus on sustainability in procurement, and these are the subject of the November 14 session. Mining Shared Value (MSV), a venture of Engineers Without Borders Canada (EWB), has partnered with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH to develop a local procurement reporting initiative for the global mining industry. According to MSV, while existing reporting frameworks like the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) exist and do encourage reporting on local procurement, the details required are not extensive, and there is considerable ambiguity on what data is actually required to be reported. Through standardizing how the global mining industry reports on local procurement, the initiative is intended to empower companies, host governments, and other stakeholders to work together to successfully increase local procurement. The local procurement reporting initiative will be released in early 2017. This presentation at Ryerson is part of an extended outreach process to the major players and stakeholders of the global mining industry following pilots in Albania and Mongolia to test the initial draft standard. The discussion of the MSV initiative will be lead by John Kielty and Emily Nickerson of MSV.  John Kielty is a social development specialist with 13 years international development experience in the public, private and non-profit sectors in Canada, China, Colombia, Holland, Mongolia and Uganda. Before joining Mining Shared Value, Emily Nickerson worked with Pollen Group evaluating systems-change approaches to agricultural market development in Tanzania, and Purpose Capital, an impact investment advisory firm, where she supported business plan development for social enterprises to launch and grow.

Meanwhile, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is nearing completion of ISO 20400, Sustainable procurement – Guidance, which is an international standard intended to help an organization meet its sustainability objectives, better manage supplier relations, improve sustainability efforts throughout the supply chain, while minimizing environmental impacts, tackling human rights issues and contributing to society and the economy. The standard is scheduled for completion and publication in 2017. Sustainable procurement is a key aspect of social responsibility, and thus ISO 20400 will complement the existing ISO standard ISO 26000, Guidance on social responsibility, by enabling organizations to contribute to sustainable development efforts.  The discussion of ISO 20400 will be lead by Dr. Kernaghan Webb, who is participating in the development of the standard. Dr. Webb is an Associate Professor in the Law and Business Department at Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management, has published extensively on CSR and law issues, and participates in and advises on a wide number of CSR related initiatives, standards, and projects.   

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://ryerson-csr-institute-sustainable-procurement.eventbrite.com

 

Social Licence to Operate: Revisiting the Concept

Date: June 28, 2016 at 12 noon

Jim Cooney Part One

Jim Cooney Part Two

Jim Cooney's powerpoint presentation

Jonathan Fung's CSA presentation

Thank you to Andrei Iovu for recording this event

 

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present “Social Licence to Operate:  Revisiting the Concept” with guest speaker Jim Cooney, the former mining executive who was the first to use the phrase in a mining context, on Tuesday, June 28, 2016, from 12 noon to 2 pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-109 (ninth floor).This event is co-sponsored by the CSA Group, Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association.

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-licence-to-operate-revisiting-the-concept-tickets-25677835096

About the Event:


The first application of the phrase "social licence to operate'" (SLO) in a resource extraction context was reported to have been by then mining executive Jim Cooney in 1997, as a way of describing the fact that, in addition to mining companies operating in developing countries needing to secure legal and regulatory approvals, the companies also were finding it necessary to win the support of locally affected interests.  Since then, the SLO phrase has taken on a life of its own, being referred to in the popular press, drawn on by opponents of projects who feel that regulatory approvals are not sufficient, employed by resource companies to indicate they have engaged meaningfully with communities, and discussed by commentators who among other things have claimed that careless use of the SLO phrase can serve to undermine the rule of law and can be a basis for rent seeking behaviour by certain interests.  Given the contested nature of SLO and its close affiliation with the equally contested concept of corporate social responsibility a discussion of SLO's origins, evolution, and current issues associated with its usage, make it an excellent topic for a Ryerson CSR Institute talk. 

About the Speaker:

Jim Cooney is Adjunct Professor at the University of British Columbia and Professor of Practice in Global Governance at McGill University. He retired as Vice President, International Government Affairs for Placer Dome Inc. on May 1, 2006, following that Company's acquisition by Barrick Gold. He held positions at Placer Dome from 1982 to 2006 in the areas of social and political risk management, government relations, sustainable development and strategic planning. With Placer Dome he was involved in exploration and mining projects in many countries in Africa, Latin America, Southeast Asia and Central Asia. He has lived and worked for extended periods in North Africa and South and East Asia. He is a past Director of the North South Institute, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and the Pacific Basin Economic Council. 

He holds a BA in philosophy and political science from Georgetown University, an MA in East Asian Studies from the University of Toronto, and an M.T.S. from the Vancouver School of Theology, for which he wrote a thesis on Christian Ethics and Corporations. 

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-licence-to-operate-revisiting-the-concept-tickets-25677835096

Event details:

Date: June 28, 2016

Time: 12 noon - 2 pm

Location: Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-109 (ninth floor). 

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://ryerson-csr-institute-social-licence.eventbrite.com

 

ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard:  Where to from here?

Date: June 9, 2016 at 12:00 noon

Overview of the June 9 talk (52 seconds: visual only)

 ISO 26000 introduction and roadmap slides

Dr. Kernaghan Webb (Ryerson CSR Institute/Law Department)-- Introduction of Talk, and discussion of ISO 26000 - Origins and Development (~30 minutes)

Webb-ISO26000a:  Origins and development

David Simpson (InterPraxis)- ISO 26000 Structure and Application (~30 minutes)

Simpson-ISO 26000:  structure and application

Dr. Ana Maria Tomlinson -- ISO 26000- Next Steps in Canada (~12 minutes)

Tomlinson-ISO 26000 CSA-adoption as national standard, next steps

Robert White: industry perspective -- (~11 minutes)

Question for Robert: Electrical Assn of Canada uses ISO 26000: who are members of EAC? (~1 minute) 

Dr. Jonathan Fowler: mining industry perspective -- (~7 minutes)

Fowler-ISO 26000 industry perspective

Howard Deane: consumer perspective -- (~10 minutes)

 Questions from the floor (~30 minutes)

Thank you to Andrei Iovu for recording this event.

 

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and CSA Group are pleased to present “ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard: Where to From Here?” on Thursday, June 9th, 2016, from 12 noon to 2 pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor).  This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://ryerson-csr-institute-csa-ISO26000.eventbrite.com

About the Event:

The ISO 26000 International Standard -- Guidance on Social Responsibility was developed by a global working group with 450 participating experts and 210 observers from 99 ISO member countries and 42 organizations in liaison.  ISO 26000 was developed under the auspices of the Technical Management Board (TMB) of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Described as a meta-organization, ISO is a non-state standards body, a federation of some 160 national standards bodies.  

Although ISO is a private body, remarkably, the development of ISO 26000 attracted the participation of peak inter-governmental bodies such as the UN Global Compact (UNGC), the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP), the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development( UNCTAD), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the UN International Labour Organization (ILO).  All of the G7 governments participated in the development of ISO 26000, as did many other governments from developed and developing countries.  

Peak industry bodies and individual companies participated, such as the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC), the International Organization of Employers (IOE), the International Council on Mines and Metals (ICMM), and IPIECA, the global oil and gas industry association devoted to environmental and social issues.  Rivalrous standards bodies also participated (e.g., ISEAL/SA 8000, AA 1000 and Global Reporting Initiative), as did peak global labour organizations, consumer organizations, standards representatives, and others.

The resultant International Standard therefore represents an important statement of the global community concerning what is expected of organizations on social and environmental issues, no matter where they operate. ISO 26000 provides practical guidance on the principles of social responsibility, explains the core subjects of social responsibility, and offers approaches for implementing socially responsible behavior into everyday operations.

While the standard ISO 26000-Guidance on Social Responsibility was agreed to and published internationally in 2010, it has only recently been adopted as a National Standard of Canada as CAN/CSA ISO 26000 Guidance on Social Responsibility.  The purpose of this seminar is to explore the standard’s development at the international level (and international variations), its position in the emerging global standards infrastructure, its structure and content, its current applications by organizations around the world, stakeholder perspectives, and possible next steps for Canada.  

Speakers:

Dr. Kernaghan Webb, Associate Professor, Ryerson University

David Simpson, Director, InterPraxis, and Chair of CSA Technical Committee on Social Responsibility

Dr. Jonathan Fowler, CEO, J.A. Fowler and Associates Inc.

Robert White, President, BRI International

Howard Deane, Member of the Board of Directors, Consumers Council of Canada

Dr. Ana-Maria Tomlinson, Project Manager, CSA Group

Event details:

Date: June 9, 2016

Time: 12 noon - 2 pm

Location: Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor). 

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: http://ryerson-csr-institute-csa-ISO26000.eventbrite.com

 

The "Legalization" of Corporate Social Responsibility: The Hong Kong ESG (Envtal, Social, Governance) Reporting Experience

Download the pdf here

To access a youtube recording of the talk, please click here

The Ryerson CSR Institute would like to express its appreciation to Paulo Magalhães for recording and production of this event.

Date: May 6, 2016 at 12 noon

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, and the Ryerson Law and Business Student Association, are pleased to present a talk on "The 'Legalization' of Corporate Social Responsibility: The Hong Kong ESG (Envtal, Social, Governance) Reporting Experience", on Friday, May 6, 2016, from 12 noon to 2 pm, with Dr. Haitian Lu, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor).  

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: www.ryerson-csr-institute-esg-reporting-hong-kong.eventbrite.com

About the Talk:

The concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has attracted considerable publicity and controversy in recent years. Earlier work has tended to focus on its voluntary dimensions, whereby companies decide voluntarily to contribute to a better society and cleaner environment. In the past decade, it has become increasingly common for countries to mandate aspects of CSR. Reflected in public companies, a prominent trend is the Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) reporting required by stock exchanges around the world. These reporting duties, addressing issues such as energy consumption, green gas emissions, work-place diversity, and supply chain management, have essentially elevated many aspects of CSR from voluntary to mandatory. What drives this wave of CSR regulation? How are these policies formulated and implemented? Are they concrete and operational? What are the responses from corporations and their stakeholders? This talk sheds light on these questions, using the Hong Kong experience of ESG reporting as a focal point for study. Key insights are drawn from an integrated analysis of Hong Kong’s ESG reporting policy making process from 2011 to 2015 (including 2 rounds of public consultations and submissions on the ESG approach), and an event study on the stock price reaction to policy shocks for previous adopters and non-adopters of voluntary ESG reporting. The Hong Kong experience provides useful guidance for other exchanges contemplating similar CSR regulations but perhaps having competitiveness concerns. The talk will also note that CSR regulation in Hong Kong can also have impacts on the CSR enhancement of companies in its neighbor global power house, China. 

The research underlying this talk is the result of a joint Ryerson Ted Rogers School of Management/Hong Kong Polytechnic University Faculty of Business initiative to encourage cross-jurisdictional/cross-university research. 

About Dr. Haitian Lu:

Dr. Haitian Lu is the Associate Head and Associate Professor in law at the School of Accounting and Finance, Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He is currently a visiting research professor at the New York University Stern School of Business. Dr. Lu’s teaching and research interest centers on the legal development, corporate governance, and corporate social responsibilities in Hong Kong and mainland China. He is also the deputy director of the Center for Economic Sustainability and Entrepreneurial Finance (CESEF) at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He is the author / co-author of the books Secured Finance Law in China and Hong Kong (2010 Cambridge University Press),Truths and Half Truths: China’s Socio-Economic Reforms 1978-2010 (2011 Chandos Publishing), and The Role of China in Global Dirty Industry Migration (2008 Chandos Publishing). Dr. Lu published widely in law, finance, economics and management journals. He is a judge panel member for Hong Kong’s Best Corporate Governance Disclosure Award (2012-present).

Event details:

Date: May 6, 2016

Time: 12 noon - 2 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor).

Although there is no cost for attending the talk, seating is limited, and you must register to attend. Register here: www.ryerson-csr-institute-esg-reporting-hong-kong.eventbrite.com

 

 

 

 

Date: June 9, 2016 at 12 noon
Date: June 9, 2016 at 12 noon
Date: June 9, 2016 at 12 noon
Date: June 9, 2016 at 12 noon
To access a youtube recording of the talk, please click here :

a picture of a leaf

Visit our "Ryerson CSR Institute in the News" page

Ryerson CSR Institute Events


2017

October 27: Law’s Sponsorship of Corporate Irresponsibility

October 11: Ryerson University CSR Institute Talk: Canada's Experience with the OECD Multinational Enterprise Guidelines and National Contact Point

October 4: Corporate Sustainability Reporting: An Evolving Story

September 29: Human Rights Defenders (HRDs): Multistakeholder Statement of Support for HRDs – Invitation to Participate

August 18:  CSR in the Caribbean Commonwealth: a Multi-Level Analysis

July 7:  Mining Conflicts & the Catholic Church: Exploring the Connections

May 19: Revenue Transparency, Corruption and the Extractive Sector: Panel Discussion

April 28: Good Faith, Honesty and the Bhasin v. Hrynew Decision: Where to From Here?

March 8: State & Non-state Regulatory Innovations: Learning from Conflict
Minerals

March 7: The Resource Curse & What Firms Can Do About It

2016

December 13: The Rise in Mining Conflict: What Lies Beneath?

November 21: Whistleblowing Systems: A New Canadian Guide

November 14:  Sustainable Procurement -- Two New Initiatives

June 28:  Social Licence to Operate: Revisiting the Concept

June 9:  ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard:  Where to from here?

May 6: The 'Legalization' of Corporate Social Responsibility: The Hong Kong ESG (Envtal, Social, Governance) Reporting Experience

April 15: Latin American Mining-Community Agreements: Case Study

March 18: Legislating CSR? Learning from India

2015

Dec 11: Indigenous Consent in the Canadian Mining Context: Learning from the Voisey's Bay Institute

Nov 12: Retail Pharmacies as Social Enterprise Health Care Providers: Lessons from USA?

Oct 26: CSR Institute Talk: Canadian Universal Investors: A Force for Socially Responsible Investing?

Oct 8: CSR Institute Talk: What does Drake have to do with CSR?

Sep 30: Forestry sustainability and APP take centre stage at Ryerson CSR Institute

Sept 18: CSR Institute Panel Discussion: From CSR Pariah to Good Performer? The Asia Pulp & Paper Turnaround Story

June 7 - 11: International Symposium on Corporate Responsibility and Sustainable
Development

March 2: Panel discussion on the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

Jan 29: CSR, Corp Lobbying & Transparency: Panel Discussion, moderated by Jeff Gray  

Jan 19: Unpacking the Peru-BHP Billiton Tintaya Dialogue Table, with Paul Warner

2014

Nov 20: CSR in the Mining Boardroom: A Panel Discussion with CEOs/Board Members

Nov 14: Understanding Community Investment:  A Panel Discussion with Five Private Sector Leaders

Oct 22: Mining & CSR in Africa: from Pressure to Impacts, with Tomas Frederiksen

Oct 20: Managing Community and Environmental Impacts During the Mining Construction Phase, with John Kielty

Oct 9: Procurement as a Means for Mining Firms to Secure their Social License to Operate, with Jeff Geipel and Kevin D'Souza

Sept 22: Aboriginals, Recent Supreme Court Decisions & Sustainable Economic Development, with Bernd Christmas

Sept 8: Corporate Diplomacy: Building the External Stakeholder-Reputation Relationship, with Witold Henisz

June 27: workshop on new development NGO-business platform

May 27: "Latin America, CSR & Standards: A Chilean Perspective" with Dante Pesce

May 8: Where to from Here: A Canadian Strategy for the UN Principles on Business and Human Rights? Visit the conference web page for details.

April 30: Corrupt and autocratic countries: to engage or to withdraw and isolate? A corporate view, with Sir Mark Moody-Stuart

April 14: The Governance Gap: Extractive Industries, Human Rights and the Home State Advantage

April 7: Resource Revenue Transparency:  The Emerging Canadian Approach

April 4: Measuring mining impacts on communities: Learning from Colombia's Cerrejon Coal Mine

March 24: rePlan’s Mining-Indigenous experiences in Canada, Africa and Central America

March 17: UNICEF Canada, CSR, & the Canadian Extractive Industry

March 3: "Senate Reform 2014:  What can we Learn from the Constitutional Repatriation Activity of 1982?"

Feb 13: "Addressing Homelessness:  Exploring Government, Private Sector and Civil Society Roles"

Jan 20: "Confessions of a Corporate Responsibility mining executive:  What Contributes to CR Success in the Mining Sector?"

Jan 16-17: Conference: Business, Human Rights and Law in Transnational Context

Jan 10: "Ontario’s new Mining Act regime: the Ontario-Aboriginal Interface"