Ted Rogers School of Management - Ryerson University hands with leaf Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility

Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility

Increase Text Size
Decrease Text Size
 Change Text Size 

2014

Jan 10 | Jan 16-17 | Jan 20 | Feb 13 | Mar 3 | Mar 17 | Mar 24 | April 4 | April 7 | April 14 | April 30 | May 8 | May 27

2013

Jan 31 | Feb 12 | Feb 13 | Feb 28 | Mar 6 | Mar 21 | April 4April 9 | May 1 | May 29-31 | May 29 | May 17 | Sept 25 | Oct 1 | Oct 9 | Oct 11 | Oct 29 | Oct 29 | Oct 31 | Nov 13 | Nov 19 | Nov 22 | Nov 25 | Nov 27 | Dec 12  

2012

Nov 29 | Nov 16 | Nov 2 | Oct 30 | Oct 29 | Oct 19 | Sept 21 | May 4 | April 20, 2012 | April 18 | April 2 | February 13 | Jan 27 | Jan 26 | 2011 events

 

May 27, 2014

"Latin America, CSR & Standards: A Chilean Perspective" with Dante Pesce

Download the presentation (pdf)

Audio recording (169 MB)

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors the Ryerson CSR Student Association and the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, is pleased to present a talk on "Latin America, CSR & Standards: A Chilean Perspective," with Dante Pesce, the founder of Centro Vincular for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development (Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaíso, Chile), on Tuesday, May 27, 2014, from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm at Ryerson University in Toronto (registration details below).   

Like other parts of the world, Latin America has an evolving relationship with the concept of social responsibility (SR) and the role of SR standards as applied by governments, the private sector and civil society.  Dante Pesce played a leadership role in Latin America in the development and deployment of the ISO 26000 social responsibility standard, and has worked intensively with the wine and mining sectors on CSR issues in Chile.   He has also played important roles in the development and deployment of other SR standards in Latin America and more broadly (e.g., GRI and the UN Global Compact).

Pesce is a political scientist and historian from the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. He has a Masters in Public Management from Harvard University as well as a Diploma in Social Management from the Institute for Social Development (INDES) in the Inter-American Development Bank. Twelve years ago he founded Centro Vincular for Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development in the Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaíso, which focuses on applied research, training and capacity building, consulting and technology transfer and public policies in the sustainability field. He is currently special advisor on Latin American Public Policy in the United Nations Global Compact, and he participates in the following national and international committees:

  • National Council on Social Responsibility in Chile led by the Ministry for Economy, Development and Tourism
  • Stakeholder Council of the Global Reporting Initiative (he was also involved in the development of the latest GRI Guidelines - G4)
  • Post Publication Organisation for ISO 26000 (he was also involved in the working group responsible for the development of the standard).

Event at a Glance

Date: Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Time: 2pm to 3:30pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, ON, Room TRS 3-099

Register (no admission but seating limited) at http://ryerson-csr-institute-latin-america-csr.eventbrite.ca
 

Thursday 8 May 2014

Where to from here: A Canadian Strategy for Implementing the UN Principles on Business and Human Rights?

For more information on this all-day event, and on how to register, please visit our web page.
 

Wednesday 30 April 2014

Corrupt and autocratic countries: to engage or to withdraw and isolate? A corporate view, with Sir Mark Moody-Stuart

Download audio file (204 MB)

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsor the Ryerson CSR Student Association, is pleased to present: a talk with Sir Mark Moody-Stuart, author of the new book Responsible Leadership by Greenleaf Publishing on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 from noon to 2:00PM.  This event is organized by the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of CSR, with co-sponsors the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association and the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association.

Based on years of experience living in many countries Moody-Stuart examines differing outcomes of development in resource rich companies. The ability of governments to use resource income effectively is clearly critical. The book addresses the responsibility of companies when governments are incapable or unwilling to fulfil their responsibilities.  It shows how companies can work in coalitions with civil society to address problematic issues. In relations to countries with authoritarian regimes or where there may be human rights abuses, the book discusses the benefits of ongoing open engagement, including investment by responsible companies, as an instrument of change, in contrast to policies isolation and sanctions so often applied with counterproductive effects. The challenges of climate change and corruption are addressed. Most importantly, how can companies embed values in their day to day operations across the world. Many real examples from a career in Shell and Anglo American are drawn upon.

Sir Mark Moody-Stuart served as Managing Director of Royal Dutch Shell plc from 1991–2001 and as Non-Executive Chairman of Anglo American plc from 2002–2009. He has been Lead Director of Accenture plc since November 2002 and a Director of Saudi Arabian Oil Company since August 2007. Sir Mark serves as Vice Chairman of the UN Global Compact, and Chairman of the Global Compact Foundation and the Innovative Vector Control Consortium.

Event Details

Date: Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Time: 12 noon to 2 pm  

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, ON, Room TRS 3-119

Register (no admission but seating limited) at http://ryerson-csr-institute-anti-corruption-moody-stuart.eventbrite.ca


April 14, 2014

The Governance Gap: Extractive Industries, Human Rights and the Home State Advantage

Download the presentation slides (pdf)

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, the Ryerson MBA Mining Stream, and the Ryerson Chang School Mining Management Certificate Program, is pleased to present a talk on The Governance Gap: Extractive Industries, Human Rights and the Home State Advantage, with Professors Penelope Simons (Univ of Ottawa) Audrey Macklin (Univ of Toronto) based on their similarly titled newly published book.

About the talk and book:

Professors Simons and Macklin’s recent book (Routledge, 2014) confronts the persistence of the governance gap with respect to the human rights-impacting conduct of transnational extractive corporations operating in zones of weak governance. In this presentation, they summarize the main arguments in the book and relate it to the Canadian context.

The book grows out of their own experience as members of the 1999 Canadian Assessment Mission to Sudan (Harker Mission). Drawing on academic explorations of 'new governance', the authors assess legal and other non-binding governance mechanisms that have emerged since that time, including the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. They argue that such mechanisms are incapable of systematically preventing human rights violating behaviour by transnational corporations, or of assuring accountability of these actors or recompense for victims of such violations. The authors contend that home state regulation, while not a silver bullet, has a crucial role to play in regulating such conduct. They pick up where UN Special Representative John Ruggie’sGuiding Principles on Business and Human Rights left off, and propose an innovative, robust and adaptable template for strengthening the regulatory framework of home states.

Event Details:

Time: Monday, April 14, 2014, 3 pm to 4:30 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, Room TRS 3-099

Register (no admission but seating limited) at http://ryerson-csr-institute-governance-gap.eventbrite.ca

 

April 7, 2014

Resource Revenue Transparency:  The Emerging Canadian Approach

Download the presentation slides (pdf)

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors noted below, is pleased to announce a talk on “Resource Revenue Transparency:  The Emerging Canadian Approach,”  with co-speakers Claire Woodside of Publish What You Pay-Canada (PWYPC) and Ross Gallinger (PDAC). There is no admission for this event but seating is limited. To register click here:  

http://ryerson-csr-institute-revenue-transparency.eventbrite.ca

Canada is developing a unique multi-stakeholder approach to increasing the transparency of payments to government made by extractive sector companies.  A working group comprised of industry associations and civil society organizations (the Resource Revenue Transparency Working Group, or RRTWG) came together in 2012 to develop a reporting framework for Canadian extractive companies – with the overarching goal of establishing greater transparency in the mining sector in Canada and overseas.  Two of the key actors in the RRTWG are Publish What You Pay Canada (PWYPC) and the Mining Association of Canada (MAC). The access to information resulting from the implementation of the Working Group’s recommended framework is intended to provide citizens around the world with the tools they need to achieve accountable, responsible and transparent management of natural resource development. Building on this, and on initiatives in the U.S. and elsewhere, in June, 2013, the federal government announced that its intention to establish mandatory reporting standards for Canadian extractive companies.  The emerging Canadian approach shows the potential for the private sector and civil society to take leadership and work together to find common solutions to resource extractive sector issues, and it shows the willingness of the federal government to build on private sector-civil society cooperative efforts. On Monday, April 7, from 12 noon to 1:30 pm, Claire Woodside of PWYPC and Ross Gallinger of PDAC will discuss their work to date and next steps.  

This event is organized by the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of CSR, with co-sponsors the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association, the Ryerson MBA Mining Stream, and the Ryerson Chang School Continuing Education Mining Management Certificate Program.

About Claire Woodside:

Claire Woodside is the Director of Publish What You Pay-Canada.  Drawing upon her background in political science and international development, including an M.A. from Dalhousie and doctoral studies at NPSIA (Carleton), Claire works to create a more transparent and accountable global extractive sector.

About Ross Gallinger

Ross Gallinger is the Executive Director of Prospectors and Developers Association Canada (PDAC).  Prior to that, he has held senior sustainability oriented postions in mining companies, including most recently acting as Senior Vice President, Health, Safety and Sustainability at IAMGOLD.

Event Details:

Date: Monday, April 7, 2014

Time: 12 noon to 1:30 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, Room TRS 3-119

Register (no admission but seating limited) at:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-revenue-transparency.eventbrite.ca

 

April 4, 2014

Measuring mining impacts on communities: Learning from Colombia's Cerrejon Coal Mine

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors noted below, is pleased to announce a talk on “Measuring mining impacts on communities: Learning from Colombia's Cerrejon Coal Mine” with Dr. Mauricio Ferro, formerly the Head of the Social Engagement Division, Corporate  Social Responsibility Department, of Cerrejón LLC, Cerrejón (Colombia). There is no admission for this event but seating is limited. To register click here:

http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-impacts-colombia.eventbrite.ca

The promise of corporate social responsibility, so the argument goes, is that while a firm is generating economic wealth it is also contributing to sustainable development in a firm’s area of influence, improving the standard of living of community members, decreasing poverty, with its activities aligned with international norms pertaining to respecting human rights, worker rights, and environmental protection. Between promise and performance lies the challenge.  As former Head of Cerrejon’s Social Engagement Division in its CSR Department, Dr. Ferro is ideally positioned to speak directly to the challenges associated with implementing CSR, and the measurement of it.  To understand CSR performance, there is a need for valid and reliable data allowing the rigorous, solid study and analysis of mining impacts on surrounding communities. Which indicators are to be collected? What do we need to look at to ensure sustainable development of the communities affected by extractive industries in the short, medium and long term?

Dr. Ferro will discuss his experience at Cerrejon, drawing on his recently published monograph, “Standard of living and health: An Assessment of Cerrejón Area of Influence”. 

This event is organized by the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of CSR, with co-sponsors the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association, the Ryerson MBA Mining Stream, and the Ryerson Chang School Continuing Education Mining Management Certificate Program.

About Mauricio Ferro:

From 2007 through 2012, as Cerrejon’s Head of the Social Engagement Division, Corporate  Social Responsibility Department, Dr. Ferro lived in Cerrejon and contributed to the restructuring of the Social Responsibility Area. He helped organize and was the first president of Tecnocerrejon, a Technical College whose mission was and is to train Cerrejon’s aboriginal and surrounding communities. He has lived and worked in Colombia, Ecuador, Spain, Germany, Italy, and Canada. Previously he was Chief Statistician of Colombia, Dean and Professor at University of Los Andes School of Management, and COO of a Supermarket Chain.  He is a graduate of the Leopold Franzens Universitaet Innsbruck (Austria), Saint’Anselm University (Rome), and Harvard University. Currently Dr. Ferro works as an independent consultant.

About Cerrejon coal mine:

Cerrejón is an integrated thermal coal mining and transport complex in La Guajira, a province in the peninsula of the same name, located in the northernmost section of Colombia. It is one of the largest coal-export mining operations in the world. It includes a thermal coal open-pit mine that produces 33 million tonnes a year, a railroad that is 150 kilometres long, connecting the mine with Puerto Bolívar, a coal port, located in Bahía Portete. Cerrejón employs 10,000 people, it is independently operated by local Colombian management, but is owned in three equal parts to subsidiaries of BHP Billiton, Anglo American, and GlencoreXstrata.

Event Details:

Date: Friday, April 4, 2014

Time: 12 noon to 1:30 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, Room TRS 3-099 (ninth floor).

Register (no admission but seating limited) at:   http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-impacts-colombia.eventbrite.ca

 

Monday 24 March 2014

rePlan’s Mining-Indigenous experiences in Canada, Africa and Central America

Download presentation

rePlan has had an opportunity to work on a number of development projects in Canada, Africa, and Central America that have brought together the mining sector and indigenous communities.  In this talk, veteran rePlan team members (bio info below) will explore some of the critical challenges, opportunities, similarities and differences associated with the mining sector/indigenous nexus.  This event is organized by the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of CSR, with co-sponsors the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association and the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association.

Register (no admission but seating limited) at: http://ryerson-csr-institute-replan-mining-indigenous.eventbrite.ca

About rePlan | planningAlliance | regionalArchitects

Headquartered in Toronto and founded in 1978, rePlan and its affiliated firms planningAlliance and regionalArchitects comprises over 80 professional staff, including community engagement and development specialists, social scientists, planners, engineers, architects and lawyers.  They offer natural resource companies and financial institutions a comprehensive range of services to help them understand and manage their social impacts and risks.  These services include community engagement, social impact and risk assessment, social management planning, land acquisition and resettlement, regional and community master planning, housing design and construction, and training and capacity building.  They have worked with some of the largest companies in the resource extraction sector, including Barrick, BHP Billiton, Chevron, Glencore, Newmont, RioTinto, Shell, Vale and Xstrata, as well as various International Financial Institutions.  They also work for public agencies, First Nations groups, and not-for-profit organizations.   To date, they have worked in more than 50 countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia and Europe.  rePlan and its affiliated firms are headquartered in Toronto, and have branch offices in Western Canada (Edmonton), West Africa (Dakar, Senegal) and Latin America (Quito, Ecuador).

About rePlan Team members Michelle Drylie and Janet Fishlock

Michelle Drylie

Michelle is a Project Manager and Senior Planner with a strong focus on process design and stakeholder engagement. Since joining rePlan and affiliated practices planningAlliance and regionalArchitects she played an integral management and leadership role in a number of the firm’s comprehensive planning projects since. Michelle recently completed the Thompson Economic Diversification Plan process in Northern Manitoba, a two-year, multi-million dollar initiative to prepare and implement a comprehensive socio-economic transition plan at a regional scale focused on infrastructure development, municipal and regional governance, local economic development, and education and training. She designed and implemented the stakeholder engagement process, which included a ten-member Working Group, comprising Federal, Provincial and municipal levels of government, various Aboriginal organisations, and the resource sector. This process was the first of its kind in Manitoba and had been presented as a best practice for indigenous engagement at the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) convention, the Canadian Aboriginal Minerals Association conference, and SRMining (Chile). Previously, Michelle acted as the Project Manager for the award-winning Lawrence-Allen Revitalization Study in the City of Toronto, which included regular negotiations with stakeholders, transportation and servicing infrastructure master planning, and development of land-use and urban design plans. Michelle has also worked with diverse communities in Arctic Canada, Mongolia and Turkey on a range of issues, including indigenous-led land development, climate change, linear infrastructure development and resettlement planning. Michelle is a strategic thinker whose strong technical planning skills are complemented by her ability to design and manage complex, multi-stakeholder dialogue processes.

Janet Fishlock

Janet Fishlock is a Senior Social Development Specialist with more than 20 years of experience working on social and economic development projects. Her specific areas of expertise include community consultation and stakeholder engagement; co-ordinating socio-economic and cultural studies and project impact assessments; supporting private-public sector partnerships and community-driven development, with projects pertaining to Canadian and non-Canadian mining-affected communities.  Able to work at both the corporate and community level, and well versed in international best practice around social and environmental issues, Janet is committed to assisting communities, companies and governments in collaborating in sustainable, inclusive and environmentally responsible development.  Janet graduated in 1986 with a Masters in Social Work from Wilfred Laurier University, specializing in community organizing and development, and completed a PhD in Environmental Studies at York University in 2010.  Her dissertation focused on community development theory and practice, and the growing trend of collaboration between development practitioners and the resource extraction sector.

Event Details

Date: Monday, March 24, 2014

Time: 3 pm to 4:30 pm

Location:  Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, ON, Room TRS 3-109.

Register (no admission but seating limited) at: http://ryerson-csr-institute-replan-mining-indigenous.eventbrite.ca

 

Monday 17 March 2014

UNICEF Canada, CSR, & the Canadian Extractive Industry

Download Simon Chorley's presentation (pdf)

Canadian mining companies can have a profound impact on children overseas, both for good and for bad. Cross-sector partnerships are commonly used in an effort to maximise the benefits and minimise the risks as corporate responsibility in the extractive industry continues to expand.  As the UN body with the specific mandate to promote the interests of children, the UNICEF mandate and activities can frequently overlap with that of the extractive industry in developing country contexts. This talk will map out the evolution of UNICEF Canada’s approach to CSR, the impact of Canadian mining companies on children overseas, and examples of government and corporate engagement on this issue. Current opportunities and challenges will be explored, and attendees will be challenged to rethink their perceptions of the role of multilateral agencies and the extractive industry in sustainable development.  This event is organized by the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of CSR, with co-sponsors the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association and the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association.

About Simon Chorley

Simon Chorley serves as International Programs Manager for UNICEF Canada. He is responsible for business engagement on children’s rights as part of corporate responsibility, government fundraising, liaison with other UNICEF offices, and advising on child protection issues. He also serves on the board of directors for an Ontario safe house supporting human trafficking victims. Prior to his role at UNICEF Canada, Simon served for six years as UK Coordinator for a leading international anti-human trafficking organization in London, England. He oversaw government relations, project management, funding proposals, media commentary and training delivery, and advised on business engagement. He currently lives in Ontario with his wife and two-year-old daughter, and is an avid Manchester United soccer fan. 

Event Details

Date: Monday, March 17, 2014

Time: 3 pm to 4:30 pm

Location:  Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, ON , Room TRS 3-109.

Register (no admission but seating limited) at:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-unicef-extractives.eventbrite.ca

 

Monday 3 March 2014

Senate Reform 2014:  What can we Learn from the Constitutional Repatriation Activity of 1982?

Gain insights concerning possible Senate reform in 2014 from political/business insider and Ryerson distinguished visiting professor Hershell Ezrin, who was directly involved in the 1982 Constitutional repatriation exercise.  What are the pitfalls and challenges associated with explaining complex Constitutional reform issues to the public in an atmosphere of public mistrust? How do you explain and gain support when there are significant differences in public opinion and understanding?  How does the existence of social media change the landscape?  What is the role of government, business, non-governmental organizations, and academia in constitutional reform discussions? This is the last in the popular five part speaker series with Hershell Ezrin that is organized by the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of CSR, with co-sponsors the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association and the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association.

Event Details

Date: Monday 3 March 2014

Time: 4:30 pm to 6 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, ON , Room TRS 3-109

Register (no admission but seating limited) at:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-senate-reform.eventbrite.ca

 

Thursday 13 February 2014

Addressing Homelessness:  Exploring Government, Private Sector and Civil Society Roles

The Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA), with co-sponsors the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association (RCSRSA), and the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, has organized an evening event on homelessness, with a student debate (6 pm to 7 pm), followed by a one hour panel discussion on homelessness  moderated by Prof. Kernaghan Webb with Michael Shapcott, Director, Affordable Housing and Social Innovation at the Wellesley Institute and Sean Gadon, head of the City of Toronto’s affordable housing office (7 pm to 8 pm), followed by a networking opportunity and refreshments (8 pm to 9 pm).  This event is directed specifically at Ryerson business students.  There is a $5 admission charge that will be donated to an anti-homelessness initiative.  

Event details

Date: Thursday 13 February 2014

Time: 6 pm to 9 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, ON.  

For further information contact Ian Amirthanathan at: amirth.ian@gmail.com or Anthony De Rose at:aederose@gmail.com

 

January 20, 2014

"Confessions of a Corporate Responsibility mining executive:  What Contributes to CR Success in the Mining Sector?"

Download presentation (pdf)

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson MBA Mining Stream, and the Ryerson Continuing Education Mining Management Certificate, are pleased to present "Confessions of a Corporate Responsibility mining executive:  What Contributes to CR Success in the Mining Sector?"  on Monday, Jan. 20 from 3 pm until 4:30 pm, with Dr. Craig Ford, former VP of CR at Inmet Corp, and now President of NPB Consulting, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-099 (on the ninth floor).   

There is no admission for this event. As seating is limited we ask that you register as soon as possible at: http://ryerson-csr-institute-confessions-of-CR-exec.eventbrite.ca    

 Craig Ford is President of NPB Consulting and the former Vice President, Corporate Responsibility at Inmet Mining Corporation (from 2000 to 2013).  Craig received his PhD (Geology/Geochemistry) from the Colorado School of Mines, and has worked in the resource development sector his entire career, first as a geologist and for the past 20 years in Corporate Responsibility.  Drawing on his business experience in the mining sector, Craig will discuss the factors that contribute to CR success and how to ensure that CR is a valued as a strategic business asset.

Event Details:

Date: Monday, January 20, 2014

Time:  3:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Location:  Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-099 (on the ninth floor).

There is no admission for this event but as seating is limited, please register at: http://ryerson-csr-institute-confessions-of-CR-exec.eventbrite.ca

January 16-17, 2014

Business, Human Rights and Law in Transnational Context

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to be a co-sponsor of a two day conference at Ryerson University, January 16 – 17, on Business, Human Rights and Law in Transnational Context.

Business and human rights are two of the most predominant features of global affairs, even though their relationship is at times tense. Through the collaborative efforts of a range of stakeholders, including governments, business leaders, and civil society, we are beginning to appreciate the extents to which the two are intertwined in terms of their respective operations, goals and institutions. These efforts have resulted in the production of important global standards, including the UN Global Compact and the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. While not legally binding, these norms facilitate collaborative learning, the identification of best practices and the more effective protection of human rights.

As a country heavily involved in international trade, development, and commerce, Canada has a significant stake in the relationship between business and human rights. On the one hand, some Canadian corporations have recently been linked to a range of human rights abuses abroad, including: crimes against humanity, forced relocations, forced and child labour, suppression of freedom of association and expression, infringements of property rights, and bribery. On the other hand, many of our top corporations have internalized global standards, reinforcing our national reputation as human rights leaders. In June, 2013, for example, seven Canadian companies – Barrick Gold Corp.; GlobeScan Inc.; Scotiabank; Suncor Energy Inc.; Teck Resources Limited; TELUS Corp.; and Unilever Canada – launched the Canadian chapter of the United Nations Global Compact. All three branches of the Canadian government have similarly played leadership roles in connecting business and human rights through law. Recent examples include legislation on anti-corruption in the context of foreign trade and investment, the government-initiated National Roundtables on Corporate Social Responsibility and the Canadian Extractive Industry in Developing Countries, the subsequent creation of an Office of the Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility Counsellor and associated policies, and the judicial willingness to assert jurisdiction over alleged human rights abuses perpetrated by Canadian corporations abroad.

Set against the backdrop of these recent global and domestic legal initiatives, this conference will connect faculty and students from Canadian and foreign universities with a range of people in government, business, and civil society to initiate dialogue about how to use law to prevent human rights abuses in areas of special significance to Canadian business, including: mining and resource extraction, international trade and investment, labour and worker safety, and the environment. The conference will be held at Oakham House, Ryerson University, Toronto, over two days – January 16-17, 2014 – and is co-sponsored by the Ryerson Law Research Centre and the Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility.  For further information, contact: graham.hudson@crim.ryerson.ca  or aorlova@ryerson.ca

event details

date: January 16-17, 2013

location: Oakham House, Ryerson University

 

January 10, 2014

Ontario’s new Mining Act regime-the Ontario-Aboriginal Interface

Download the presentation (pdf / 3 MB)

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors the Ryerson CSR Student Association, the Ryerson MBA Mining Stream, and the Ryerson Continuing Education Mining Management Certificate, are pleased to present a talk on Ontario’s New Mining Act Regime – the Ontario Aboriginal Interface,”  on Friday, Jan. 10 from 2 pm until 3:30 pm, with Bernie Hughes and Bob Merwin from the Mines and Minerals Division of the Ontario Ministry of Northern Development and Mines (MNDM).  Bernie Hughes is the Director of the Aboriginal Relations Branch for the MNDM, and Bob Merwin is currently Executive Advisor with the Mines and Minerals Division of the MNDM (more info below).  The talk will be held at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-099 (on the ninth floor).  There is no admission for this event. As seating is limited we ask that you register as soon as possible at:  http://RyersonCsrInstitute-Ont-Mining-Aboriginal.eventbrite.ca

The question of how mineral development will take place in Ontario is integrally connected to the issue of how governments and the mining sector will effectively interact with Ontario Aboriginal groups.  Among other things, the recent revisions make to the Ontario Mining Act regime represent an attempt to address the mining-Aboriginal interface, in keeping with Supreme Court of Canada jurisprudence concerning the Crown’s duty to consult and accommodate affected Aboriginal interests.  Bernie and Rob will discuss the current state and evolving nature of the Aboriginal environment in Ontario as it relates to Ontario’s mineral sector and the Mining Act, in particular.   

Bernie Hughes is the Director of the Aboriginal Relations Branch for the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, in Sudbury. The Aboriginal Relations Branch supports the ministry’s mandate for mineral development across Ontario and economic development for northern Ontario. The ministry works with provincial Aboriginal organizations, regional Tribal Councils, and individual First Nations in promoting participation in the northern economy and the mineral sector.

Prior to work in Ontario, Bernie resided in the Northwest Territories where he occupied a number of positions including Director of Policy and Planning for Aboriginal and Northern Development Canada; Executive Assistant to the Premier of the Northwest Territories; and Senior Policy Advisor, Inter-Governmental Affairs, Government of the Northwest Territories. Bernie has a Bachelor of Arts from Wilfrid Laurier University, a qualifying year in Applied Linguistics from the University of Victoria, and a Master’s of Education from the University of British Columbia.

Robert Merwin is currently Executive Advisor with the Mines and Minerals Division of the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines leading several strategic projects related to mineral development in Ontario. Most recently, he was Director of the Mining Act Secretariat with MNDM where he was responsible for leading a team developing the legislation, regulations, and policies that will guide future mineral exploration and mining in Ontario.

Prior to this, Robert was Executive Director of the Diamond Sector Unit with MNDM responsible for negotiating an agreement with DeBeers Canada and the Diamond Trading Company in London to cut and polish 10% of the Victor diamond mine production in Ontario. He was also responsible for drafting Ontario’s diamond royalty regulation and policies.  Robert has an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of Waterloo, a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Queen’s University and is a graduate of the Ivey Executive Program at the University of Western Ontario.

Event Details:

Date: Friday, January 10, 2014

Time:  2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Location:  Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-099 (on the ninth floor).

There is no admission for this event but as seating is limited, please register at: http://RyersonCsrInstitute-Ont-Mining-Aboriginal.eventbrite.ca

For further information - http://www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute/

Or contact Dr. Kernaghan Webb - kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

 

December 12, 2013

Webinar: The UN Global Compact & ISO 26000 as Frameworks for Corporate Sustainability: Learning from the Schneider Electric Experience 

Presentations for download (pdf):

A wide variety of instruments and tools are available to assist companies in developing their approaches to sustainability.  Two of the most prominent global instruments are the UN Global Compact and the ISO 26000 International Standard - both of which provide global guidance on social responsibility.   
  
The Global Compact Network Canada and the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility are pleased to invite you to participate in a webinar from 12 noon to 1:30 pm, on Thursday, December 12, 2013.  The webinar will explore the purpose and role of the UN Global Compact and the ISO 26000 as instruments to guide corporate citizenship.  Speakers include:

  • Helle Bank Jorgensen, Head of the Global Compact Network Canada discussing the UN Global Compact as the world’s largest voluntary corporate citizenship initiative with over 10,000 signatories in 130 countries committing to ten universally accepted principles relating to human rights, anti-corruption, labour and the environment.
  • Prof. Kernaghan Webb, Law & Business Department, Ryerson University discussing the role of ISO 26000 as a global standard that guides how businesses and other organizations can operate in a socially responsible way.  ISO 26000 addresses 7 key core SR topics, and was developed through an extensive five year multistakeholder process involving inter-governmental bodies, governments, industry, labour, consumer groups, and others, from developed and developing countries.
  • Special address from Mr. Chris Curtis, Senior Advisor and former President/CEO of Schneider Electric (North America), discussing Schneider Electric's sustainability approach, and in particular, the role and use of the UN Global Compact and ISO 26000 in development and implementation of the Schneider Electric Sustainability Approach.*  

About Schneider Electric: Schneider Electric is a France-based multinational corporation that specializes in electricity distribution, automation management and produces installation components for energy management.  Chris Curtis is President and Chief Executive Officer of Schneider Electric NA, a division of Schneider Electric SA.  With operations in over 130 countries, Schneider Electric SA is a $31 billion global energy management company headquartered in France.

About Chris Curtis: Chris’s experience with Schneider Electric currently spans two decades and, at present he is a Senior Advisor to Schneider Electric. and recently as CEO oversaw all operations in the United States, Canada and Mexico. Under Chris’ North American leadership, sales topped $7 billion with industry-leading market share, profitability and cash-flow generation. In addition, was  a member of the Corporate Executive Committee, and from 2008 to 2012, he led Schneider Electric’s Buildings Business ($2 billion) globally. Chris is a leading authority on “Intelligent Energy.” He has directed Schneider Electric’s efforts to drive energy efficiency and sustainability around the globe and will sit as Chair of the Board of Governors for the National Electrical Manufacturers Association in 2014 to complement his leadership efforts with several non-profit organizations.  

Event details

date: December 12, 2013

time: 12 noon to 1:30 pm

location: Webinar

To participate in this webinar, please register here:  http://RyersonCSR-Institute-Webinar-UNGC-ISO26000.eventbrite.ca

  
* For more information on Schneider Electric Sustainability Approach see:  http://www2.schneider-electric.com/documents/presentation/en/local/2013/04/strategy-and-sustainable-highlights-2012-2013.pdf and http://www2.schneider-electric.com/documents/sustainable-development/sustainability-investors-analysts/schneider-electric-sustainable-development-commitment.pdf 
  

For further information, see our website: www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute/

Or contact Dr. Kernaghan Webb – kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca 

 

November 27, 2013

“Business Use of Regulations to Create & Protect Markets” 

This is the fourth of a five part speaker series with Business/Politics Insider Hershell Ezrin (more information about this event and the series will be provided later).  This event and speaker series is co-sponsored by the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association, the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association, the Ryerson Law Centre, and the Ryerson Department of Law and Business in the Ted Rogers School of Management.

Event details:

Date: November 27, 2013

Time: 4:00pm - 5:30pm

 

November 25, 2013

de Beers Cda's Approach to First Nations Community Engagement

Download presentation (pdf)

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, together with co-sponsors the Ryerson CSR Student Association and Ryerson University's Chang School of Continuing Education Mining Certificate Program, is pleased to present a talk by Dr. Jonathan Fowler, VP of Aboriginal Engagement and Sustainability at De Beers Canada,  on “De Beers Canada’s Approach to First Nations Community Engagement” on Monday, November 25 from 2 pm to 3:30 pm at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-109 (on the ninth floor).  This event is part of a series that invites constructive engagement on company and NGO approaches on corporate social responsibility/sustainability issues.  There is no admission for this event. As seating is limited we ask that you register as soon as possible at: 

http://ryersoncsr-institute-debeerscda2-community.eventbrite.ca   

In light of its significant operations in the North of Canada, De Beers Canada has considerable experience with respect to First Nations community engagement as part of its broader sustainability approach.  For the past 45 years Dr. Fowler, Vice President of Aboriginal Affairs and Sustainability at de Beers Canada has worked in diamond exploration, mining and community engagement with different indigenous peoples, and for the last 30 years has worked in Canada. He joined Anglo American Corporation of South Africa in 1968, was immediately second to De Beers, and then transferred to De Beers in 1985. He has worked in Namibia, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, Kalaallit Nunaat, and Canada. His geological career has included exploration in Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, Kalaallit Nunaat and Canada; mining in Namibia and Botswana; and administration and management in Namibia, South Africa, Botswana, Zambia, and Canada. He has been involved in the evaluation of alluvial and primary deposits. His sustainability work includes corporate social responsibility as well as overseeing implementation of best practices within the mines and exploration projects of De Beers Canada and their certification to the Responsible Jewellery Council as part of the De Beers Group certification in 2012. He is an alumnus of the University of London, where he obtained a B.Sc. (Special) Honours degree in geology in 1968 (Bedford College), a M.Phil. degree in 1976 and a Ph.D. in 1982. He is also a Professional Geologist in Ontario, Manitoba, NWT and Saskatchewan in Canada, and an Eur. Geol. in the European Union. He is married (39 years) and has one son.

Event Details:

Event title: “De Beers Canada’s Approach to First Nations Community Engagement"

Date: Monday, November 25

Time:  2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Location:  Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-109 (on the ninth floor).

There is no admission for this event but as seating is limited, please register at:  http://ryersoncsr-institute-debeerscda2-community.eventbrite.ca

For further information, see our website: www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute/

 

November 22, 2013

 “The Canadian Food Industry and Corporate Responsibility:  Connecting the Dots”

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, Emond Montgomery publications, and the Ryerson CSR Student Association are pleased to present a talk on “The Canadian Food Industry and Corporate Responsibility:  Connecting the Dots” on Friday, Nov. 22, 2013, from 11 am to 12:30 pm, at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, Room TRS 3-129 (on the ninth floor). 

There is no cost for this event, but as seating is limited, we ask that you please RSVP to:   sphilipp@emp.ca

Featured speakers for this discussion on CSR and the ethical practices associated with food production include Jamie Cooney, the CEO of Rowe Farms, and Toby Heaps, the CEO of Corporate Knights magazine. 

Also at this talk the winners of the Emond Montgomery Business Ethics and CSR case study competition will be revealed (see: www.emp.ca/casestudy )

Event details:

Date:  Friday, November 22, 2013 at 11am

Location: Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management

Room TRS 3-129

55 Dundas West, 9th floor

Complimentary refreshments will be served.

RSVP appreciated: sphilipp@emp.ca

 

November 19, 2013

Banro’s Approach to CSR & Community Development in the Congo-Tuesday

Download presentation (pdf)

Ryerson University's Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), together with co-sponsors the Ryerson CSR Student Association and Ryerson University's Chang School of Continuing Education Mining Certificate Program, is pleased to present a talk on Canadian-based mining company Banro's approach to CSR and Community Development in the Congo, by Mr. Martin Jones, Chairman of the Banro Foundation.  The talk will take place on Tuesday, Nov. 19, from 2:00 pm to 3:30 pm, at Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas St. West, in Room TRS 3-099 (on the ninth floor).   

This talk is part of a series where companies and non-governmental organizations are given an opportunity to present and engage in constructive engagement concerning their environmental, social and economic-oriented activities and approaches.

About Banro's Approach to CSR & Community Development in the Congo

In this talk, Mr. Jones describes Banro’s evolving approach to CSR and community development in the challenging operating environment of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).  Banro's commitment to corporate social responsibility is reported as involving many facets, including the building of positive and supportive relations with local communities, the creation of capacity-building jobs for Congolese citizens, environmental protection, workplace safety, the purchase of goods and services locally and the Banro Foundation, which promotes local social and economic development. The Company has indicated that it is committed to and compliant with the IFC Environmental and Social Performance Standards, the World Gold Council (WGC) conflict-free gold standards, the standards and guidelines of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and the Standards of the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR). Banro has also indicated that it is fully supportive of the introduction of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative in the DRC. Through its compliance with the standards and guidelines of the WCG, the OECD and the ICGLR, Banro has reported that it is aligned with all EITI essential principles. Banro has also indicated that it is currently implementing the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights with the assistance of a third party auditor. 

About Martin Jones

Martin Jones joined Banro in 2004 as Vice President, Corporate Development, following a career as a consultant in corporate communications. In 2007, he took over management of the Company's registered charity, the Banro Foundation. In 2011 he became its Chairman. The Banro Foundation has been formally recognized in the DRC and Canada for its contributions to social and economic reconstruction in the DRC.

Event Details

Date: Tuesday, November 19

Time:  2:00 pm to 3:30 pm

Location:  Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-099 (on the ninth floor).

 

November 13, 2013

“Getting Out of A Sticky Wicket: the Evolving Canada-India Relationship, from the Nuclear question, to the Air India bombing, to Trade Relations, and Beyond”

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association (Ryerson CSRSA), the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA), the Ryerson Law Centre, and the Department of Law and Business in Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, is pleased to present “Getting Out of A Sticky Wicket: the Evolving Canada-India Relations, from the Nuclear question, to the Air India bombing, to Trade Relations, and Beyond”, with Business/Politics Insider Hershell Ezrin.  This is the third of a five part speaker series by Business/Politics Insider Hershell Ezrin being presented this fall.  There is no admission for this event.  As seating is limited, we ask that you register on eventbrite: http://ryersoncsr-institute-canada-india.eventbrite.ca

The talk by Hershell Ezrin will take place on Wednesday, November 13, 2013, from 4 pm to 5:30 pm, in Room TRS 3-099, (ninth floor), in Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

From Commonwealth colleague to confrontation over international political roles at the UN and in Southeast Asia, from nuclear supplier to standstill after the 1974 peaceful nuclear explosion, from a major aid recipient to the enticement of one of the world’s greatest new markets, from the attractions of a new immigrant homeland to the tragedies of the Air India bombing and ethnic divisions, the Canada-India relationship has it all. How do you develop and apply foreign policy to further the relationship and achieve these human, business and national goals?

Hershell Ezrin is Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University for the 2013-2014 year. He is currently Managing Director of Ezrin Communications. In his earlier career as a public servant, Ezrin served as Canadian consul in New York City and Los Angeles. Subsequently, he served in the Privy Council Office under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. In 1982, he left the federal government to work for the Ontario Liberal Party and subsequently served as Deputy Minister and Principal Secretary to Ontario Premier David Peterson. Ezrin was subsequently Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of GPC International.

Event details:

Date - Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Time - 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm (please be on time)

Venue - Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

Address - 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto

Room - 9th floor, Rm. TRS 3-099

Cost - Free if registered to eventbrite. Note: limited seating; register today!

http://ryersoncsr-institute-canada-india.eventbrite.ca

 

October 31, 2013

"Addressing mining company / community conflict: what's been learned?" with Luc Zandvliet  

Download presentation (pdf)

Co-sponsored by the federal Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor and the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, as part of its "Learning Partnership" series.  Our series of public seminars continues with an interactive dialogue with Luc Zandvliet, Director at Triple R Alliance and Senior Associate at Shift Project. 

Luc Zandvliet is the Director of Triple R Alliance Inc, a small collective of experts who support companies operating in frontier markets with their stakeholder engagement approaches. He has conducted over 80 site visits with 25 companies -mainly in the oil and mining industries- in 25 countries, in a variety of capacities from conducting conflict impact assessments to coaching staff and implementing influx management plans, social investment strategies and vulnerability plans. In addition to his field work, Luc developed human rights ‘concretization’ approaches and was involved in the testing and implementation of grievance mechanisms under the mandate of John Ruggie, the UN Special Representative on Business and Human Rights. Luc frequently gives speeches for companies, Governments and think tanks, focusing on industry trends or providing workshops on specific topics such as social performance measurement, social risk approaches and human rights due diligence. 

Together with Mary Anderson, Luc authored Getting it Right: Making Corporate-Community Relations Work (May 2009), intended for corporate managers and business schools, documenting best practices with regard to company – community relations in contexts of social and political instability. The book is based on the lessons learned through the Corporate Engagement Project, which Luc directed. Sixty companies participated in this effort to develop practical management options for companies that want to ensure their presence has a positive, rather than negative, impact on local stakeholders. 

Before joining the Corporate Engagement Project, Luc worked in the humanitarian field with the International Red Cross in Ethiopia and with Médecins Sans Frontières in relief efforts in places such as Burundi, the DRC, Uganda, Sudan, and Sierra Leone.

Event details:

Date: Thursday, October 31, 2013

Time: 11:00am - 12:30pm

Location: Ryerson University’s KHE Kerr Hall East, 340 Church Street/60 Gould Street, Room KHE 125 (Note: event is NOT at Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management).

October 29, 2013

Canadian Mining/Energy Company Sherritt International's Sustainability Approach

Download presentation (pdf)

The Ryerson CSR Institute, in cooperation with the Chang School of Continuing Education Mining Certificate Program and the Ryerson CSR Student Association (RCSRSA) is pleased to present a talk on Sherritt International’s Sustainability Approach.  There is no admission if you register at:   http://ryerson-csr-institute-sherritt.eventbrite.ca

The talk is from 2 until 3:30 pm on Tuesday, October 29, in in Ryerson University’s George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre, 245 Church Street, Room ENG 101. 

Sherritt is a Canadian-based diversified natural mining/energy company with operations in Canada, Cuba, Indonesia and Madagascar.   On October 21, Sherritt announced the release of its 2012 Sustainability Report, at http://sustainability.sherritt.com  The presentation will be made by Mark Sitter, Director, Corporate Affairs and Sustainability, for Sherritt International.  Since joining Sherritt in early 2007, he has held several roles, including Deputy Director, External Relations, for the Ambatovy nickel operation in Madagascar (www.ambatovy.com). Prior to Sherritt, he worked in public affairs for private, governmental and non-governmental organizations in Canada, Central America and Southern Africa.

Event details:

Date:  Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Time:  2 pm to 3:30 pm

Location: Ryerson University’s George Vari Engineering and Computing Centre, 245 Church Street, Toronto, ON Room ENG 101. (Note: event is NOT at Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management)

Click here to register:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-sherritt.eventbrite.ca

 

October 29, 2013

Panel on Ecuador Chevron Litigation in Canada

The Chevron panel has been postponed at the request of the Equadorian representative. Stay tuned for re-scheduled time for this event!

Co-sponsored by the University of Toronto Faculty of Law’s Human Rights Program.

 

October 11, 2013

"Gender and Mining: Combatting Violence Against Women" with Todd Minerson.

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, together with co-sponsor Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association, is pleased to present a talk by Todd Minerson, Executive Director of the White Ribbon Campaign, regarding a project initiated by WRC involving Barrick Gold that is designed to combat violence against women in the mining sector.  The White Ribbon Campaign is the world’s largest effort of men and boys dedicated to ending men’s violence against women.  Started in Canada in 1991, the White Ribbon Campaign now has a presence in over 60 countries around the world.  The White Ribbon symbolizes a man’s pledge to never commit, condone, or remain silent about violence against women.  

In 2011, White Ribbon approached Barrick Gold with a unique proposition.  Barrick had experienced some tragic incidences of gender based violence at several of its mine sites around the world, and was demonstrating a genuine desire to address these problems.  White Ribbon had a 20 year history of international gender-based violence prevention work and a proposed solution.  This talk provides participants with an opportunity to understand how mining companies and non-governmental organizations are finding common ground to address issues of public concern.   On Friday, October 11, from12 noon to 1:30 pm, join us at Ryerson University in Toronto for an evidence-based conversation about corporate social responsibility in the extractive sector, gender and mining, NGO-corporate partnerships, and violence prevention work with men and boys.

There is no admission if you register on EVENTBRITE.  Seating is limited so please register today!

Todd Minerson is the Executive Director of the White Ribbon Campaign.Todd has spent the past 17 years working in gender justice, HIV/AIDS prevention, anti-poverty work, housing and homelessness, and with at-risk youth.  In all of these experiences he has seen the complex and negative effects of violence and harmful masculinities on the lives of too many people.  He has also served as a volunteer and consultant for many community organizations, including sexual assault crisis centers. 

 Todd’s work on engaging men and boys in gender based violence prevention and the pursuit of gender equality has taken him around the world.  Across his home country in Canada; to Brazil, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Zambia, Cape Verde, across Europe and North America, and most recently Papua New Guinea.  In each of these places he has not only witnessed the devastation of gender based violence, but also the hopefulness of men and boys willing to work towards a safer world for women and girls. As Executive Director of the White Ribbon Campaign, he was one of the co-chairs of the Global Symposium on Engaging Men and Boys in Gender Equality in Rio de Janeiro in March 2009.  He was on the Board of Ending Violence Against Women International, based in the US. . 

Event Details:

Date: Friday, October 11, 2013

Time: 12 noon to 1:30 pm (please be on time)

Venue: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

Address: 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto

Room:
9th floor, Rm. TRS 3-119   

Cost - Free if registered to eventbrite. Note: limited seating; register today!

To register for the "Combatting Violence Against Women" lecture, visit our eventbrite page.

 

October 9, 2013

“Law as Escape Valve: How Canadian governments use courts and the law to avoid wearing tough decisions” with Hershell Ezrin.

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors listed below, is pleased to present “Law as Escape Valve:  How Canadian governments use courts and the law to avoid wearing tough decisions”, with Business/Politics Insider Hershell Ezrin. This is the second of a five part speaker series by Hershell Ezrin being presented this fall. Seating is limited, so register early (see below). 

Judicial enquiries, references, and Royal Commissions have all become commonplace as political tools to either increase or take off the public heat or to allow governments to implement policy changes, whose support they could not otherwise explain to their political core supporters. Sometimes, such as with the Gomery inquiry and the current Montreal construction contract debacle, these tools can cause more harm than the governments setting them up ever anticipated.  What are the rationales for moving in this direction and how do governments balance the risks and rewards?

This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association (Ryerson CSRSA), the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA), the Ryerson Law Centre, and the Department of Law and Business in Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management.

This is the second of a five part Speaker Series with Business/Politics Insider Hershell Ezrin.  From the Constitution and the first Quebec Referendum, to the national debate over free trade, to equal pay for work of equal value, to amalgamation of the City of Toronto, to a negotiated accord removing a 43 year old government to classic labour face-offs and the development of PACs in Canada, Hershell Ezrin has been a trusted advisor to senior public leaders at the federal, provincial and municipal levels for over three decades.  Ezrin was a Canadian diplomat and public servant and subsequently led as CEO a Canadian international brand company  which he had helped to take public; chaired an international public affairs consultancy in 19 countries; served as a Board Director of a few of Canada’s best known companies as well as taking leadership roles in the broader not for profit and charitable sectors. He currently heads a social media advocacy consultancy, is on the advisory board of Ontarionewswatch.com and will be teaching at Ryerson as a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University for the 2013-2014 year. He is currently Managing Director of Ezrin Communications. In his earlier career as a public servant, Ezrin served as Canadian consul in New York City and Los Angeles. Subsequently, he served in the Privy Council Office under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. In 1982, he left the federal government to work for the Ontario Liberal Party and subsequently served as Deputy Minister and Principal Secretary to Ontario Premier David Peterson. Ezrin was subsequently Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of GPC International.

Event details:

Date: Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Time: 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm (please be on time)

Venue: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

Address: 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto

Room: 9th floor, Rm. TRS 3-099


Cost - Free if registered to eventbrite. Note: limited seating; register today!

To register for the "Law as Escape Valve" lecture, visit our eventbrite page.

 

October 1, 2013

“Waging War on Corruption – Inside the Movement Fighting the Abuse of Power”

Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and Transparency International-Canada, together with the below listed co-sponsors, are pleased to present:  “Waging War on Corruption – Inside the Movement Fighting the Abuse of Power” --  a talk with Frank Vogl, author of the book of the same title (see brief bio immediately below).

Frank Vogl is the author of “Waging War on Corruption”  He is the co-founder of two leading nongovernmental anti-corruption organizations: Transparency International (TI) and the Partnership for Transparency Fund (PTF). He served for nine years as TI’s vice chairman and is now an adviser to its managing director. He additionally serves as vice chairman of PTF.  Vogl was formerly a senior World Bank official and international reporter for The Times of London. Vogl is also president of Vogl Communications, Inc., Washington, DC -- an international economics and finance consulting firm.

Waging War on Corruption” is an insider's account of extraordinary battles against the abuse of public office by politicians and officials for their personal gain. This is a global journey from the birth of pioneering anti-corruption organization Transparency International in 1993, to the Arab Spring in 2011, as courageous people in scores of countries challenge authority and fight for justice. At stake is nothing less than our global security, the reduction of poverty, the stability of our economic and financial systems, and the cause of freedom and democracy.

This event is organized by Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and Transparency International-Canada.  The event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA), the Ryerson CSR Student Association (Ryerson CSRSA), the Ryerson Law Centre, and the Department of Law and Business in Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management.   The event will be held at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, 55 Dundas West, 9th floor, Room TRS 3-099.

Event details:

Date - Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Time - 2:00 to 3:30 pm (please be on time)

Venue - Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

Address - 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto

Room - 9th floor, Rm. TRS 3-099   

Cost - Free if registered to event brite. Note: limited seating; register today!

 

September 25, 2013

"LOL: how social media is changing the business-government relations game”

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with co-sponsors listed below, is pleased to present “LOL: how social media is changing the business-government relations game”, with Business/Politics Insider Hershell Ezrin. This is the first of a five part speaker series by Hershell Ezrin being presented this fall.

The rise of social media has serious implications for law, business and government policy.  This talk explores social media and media coverage, crisis management and how corporations have to now defend their brands and internal activities in a totally different way in an era of social media, and how government central policy makers listen to social media today the way they used to listen to polls (but now at warp speed).

This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association (Ryerson CSRSA), the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA), the Ryerson Law Centre, and the Department of Law and Business in Ryerson Univeristy’s Ted Rogers School of Management.

Hershell Ezrin is Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University for the 2013-2014 year. He is currently Managing Director of Ezrin Communications. In his earlier career as a public servant, Ezrin served as Canadian consul in New York City and Los Angeles. Subsequently, he served in the Privy Council Office under Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau. In 1982, he left the federal government to work for the Ontario Liberal Party and subsequently served as Deputy Minister and Principal Secretary to Ontario Premier David Peterson. Ezrin was subsequently Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of GPC International.

Event details:

Date - Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Time - 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm (please be on time)

Venue - Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

Address - 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto

Room - 9th floor, Rm. TRS 3-109

 

May 29 – 31, 2013

Conference: CIRA@2013 “From Theory and Research to Policy and Practice in Work and Employment”

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, in support of the Ryerson Centre for Labour Management Relations, is pleased to bring to your attention the upcoming Canadian Industrial Relations Association’s 50th Anniversary conference, CIRA@2013: From Theory and Research to Policy and Practice in Work and Employment, from May 29 – 31, to be held at the Ted Rogers School of Management of Ryerson University in Toronto. 

The 50th anniversary of CIRA offers an opportunity to reflect on the enormous changes that have taken place in patterns of employment, the role of the state in the workplace, the role of unions and other institutions, the role of employers and third parties since 1962 when CIRA held its first conference. The research process has also evolved in terms of methods, frameworks and the interaction among different disciplines that focus on employment.

For more information, go to: http://www.cira2013.com/

Date: May 29 - May 31,  2013

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas Street West, Toronto, ON Canada, M5G 2C5

Contact: ciraacri.conference@gmail.com

Website: http://www.cira2013.com/

 

May 29, 2013

Talk: “Overview of Recent Mining Sustainability Trends with Daniel Wang, Deloitte Sustainability / Enterprise Risk”

Co-sponsored by the federal Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor and the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, as part of its "Learning Partnership" series.  

Date: Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Time: 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm (please be on time)

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, 9th floor, Rm. TRS 3-109, 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto.

Cost: Free if registered to event brite. Note: limited seating; register today!

To register, click on the following:  http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-sd-trends.eventbrite.ca/

 

May 17, 2013

Talk: “How Accounting for Environmental Impacts Can Lower Costs:  Examining the Evidence”

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a talk by Ryerson Accounting Professor Vanessa Magness on “How Accounting for Environmental Impacts Can Lower Costs:  Examining the Evidence”

Professor Vanessa Magness is the interim Chair of the Accounting Dept. in the Ted Rogers School of Business at Ryerson University and is a Research Associate of the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility.  A management accountant by training, she has a business degree from York University, an MBA from the University of Toronto, and a doctoral degree from the University of Manitoba.  Dr. Magness’ research focuses on the topic of Environmental Accounting. This growing segment of the accounting discipline includes the examination of how environmental impacts are reported to stakeholders outside the company, and how these impacts are managed through a company’s internal decision-making process.  In addition to publishing her work in peer reviewed academic journals such as Accounting, Auditing and Accountability, the International Journal of Critical Accounting, Advances in Environmental Management and Accounting, and the Journal of Business Ethics, she has presented papers at conferences at both Oxford and Cambridge (UK), and many conferences across Canada.  In her earlier work she has argued that the reporting of useful, relevant information about environmental impacts was beyond the scope of the financial statements.  However changes in financial reporting requirements in 2004 offer new opportunities to use the financial statements to assess the effectiveness of (1) management actions and (2) governance structures, in controlling environmental impacts. 

Dr. Magness is currently engaged in a research project that examines the long term relationship between environmental management and profit in the Canadian resource sector.  She will examine how management decisions (such as to invest in R&D,  or to implement supplier certification requirements) and governance commitments (such as to implement Board level environmental management oversight) lead to  lower remediation costs and/or lower emissions. 

NOTE  funding is available for a Ryerson University graduate student to act as a research assistant (RA) for Professor Magness who can bring a critical eye to company claims, and is capable of examining company records for evidence that management has operationalized its environmental commitments.

Date: Friday, May 17, 2013

Time: 12 noon to 1:30 pm. Please be seated by 12 noon.

Location:  Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, 8th floor, room TRS 2-003.

Seating Limited: Register early

To register, click on this link:  www.ryerson-csr-institute-envtal-accounting.eventbrite.ca

 

May 1, 2013

Understanding the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: Recent Developments and Experiences”

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and the federal Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor have established a learning partnership on CSR and the extractive sector overseas, building a neutral platform to contribute to informed public discussion of important issues related to corporate social responsibility of mining, oil and gas companies, and enhancing cross-sector networking opportunities for those interested in these questions.

Our series of public seminars continues with an interactive dialogue with Alexandra Guaqueta, Member of the UN Working Group on Business and Human Rights. 

Date: Wednesday, May 1, 2013

Time: 10:00 - 11:30 am

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Room TRS 3-129, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Toronto

There is no charge to attend but seating is limited, so register early.

About the speaker

Alexandra Guáqueta (D.Phil. International Relations, Oxford) is a Lecturer in International Relations at Flinders University and has worked for over a decade on business and human rights, peace-building, Latin American regional security, drug trafficking, and democratic norms diffusion. She was Academic Director of Fundación Ideas para la Paz (2004-2008) where she created the Business and Conflict Program. She facilitated with the IBLF the “Dialogue on Business, Peace, Development and Human Rights” that led to the “Colombian Guidelines on Security and Human Rights” code and multi-stakeholder process. She piloted International Alert’s Conflict-Sensitive Business Practice tool for extractive industries with Oxy and Cerrejón (2005) and co-chaired the Secretariat of the Colombian Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights in-country process (2006-2008). She worked for Oxy (2002-2004) on the implementation of new human rights standards and was Social Standards and International Engagement Head at Cerrejón (2008-2011) focusing on social standards, local and international stakeholder engagement, labour rights, and indigenous peoples’ rights. At Cerrejón she road-test the operational-level grievance mechanism effectiveness criteria proposed by the Ruggie mandate. She was Senior Associate of the Economic Agendas in Civil Wars Program of the International Peace Institute (2001-2002) and Coordinator of the Regional Security Cooperation Program of the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung-Colombia (2004-2008). Dr. Guáqueta serves in the High-Level Advisory Committee of the European Commission’s Sectoral Guidelines on business and human rights project, the Board of Trustees of Shift, the World Economic Forum’s Council on Human Rights and Better Coal’s Stakeholder Advisory Committee. She has authored more than 30 academic and policy publications.

A classroom full of students listening to Alexandra Guaqueta

 

April 9 – 12, 2013

“2nd International Symposium on Corporate Responsibility & Sustainable Development, Guangzhou, China”

Co-organized by the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and the Centre for Corporate Responsibility at the London Metropolitan University Business School, hosted by Guangdong University of Foreign Studies, Guangzhou, China. Details can be found on the symposium's website http://www.cr-sd.org/index.php/syposium/symposium

This symposium will address a number of CSR and Sustainable Development themes. For further information regarding Ryerson University participation, please contact Dr. Phil Walsh (prwalsh@ryerson.ca) who will be co-ordinating Ryerson participant funding.

 

April 4, 2013

Screening of “Carbon Rush” documentary

The Ryerson MBA CSR Committee, the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, Activate T.O. and the Ryerson Bachelor of Commerce CSR Students Association are pleased to present a free screening of Amy Miller's documentary about the carbon credits industry and its impacts, “Carbon Rush.”

When: Thursday, April 4 from 4:00-6:30pm

Where: TRSM 3-099

About Carbon Rush (from: www.thecarbonrush.net/ )

Hundreds of hydroelectric dams in Panama. Incinerators burning garbage in India. Biogas extracted from palm oil in Honduras. Eucalyptus forests harvested for charcoal in Brazil.

What do these projects have in common? They are all receiving carbon credits for offsetting pollution created somewhere else. But what impact are these offsets having? Are they actually reducing emissions? And what about the people and the communities where these projects have been set up?

THE CARBON RUSH takes viewers around the world to meet the people most impacted. They are the least heard in the cacophony surrounding in this emerging “green-gold” multi-billion dollar carbon industry. From indigenous rain forest dwellers having their way of life completely threatened, to dozens of Campesinos assassinated, to the livelihood of waste pickers at landfills taken away, THE CARBON RUSH travels across four continents and brings us up close to projects working through the United Nations, Kyoto Protocol designed Clean Development Mechanism. This groundbreaking documentary feature asks the fundamental questions “What happens when we manipulate markets to solve the climate crisis? Who stands to gain and who stands to suffer?”

Amy Miller is a media maker and social justice organizer based in Montréal. She is currently in post production for her new documentary ‘War for Soil’ a hard hitting film on the economy, agricultural land grabs and the changes to farmers lives around the world. She recently finished directing and producing the documentary ‘The Carbon Rush’ a global exposé on how carbon offset projects impact local peoples. She directed and produced the featurette documentary ‘Myths for Profit: Canada’s Role In Industries of War and Peace’ which was screened thoroughly across Canada and at festivals including the Milano Film Festival, RIDM and won the Peoples Choice award at the Bay Street Film Festival. Her first doc ‘Outside of EUrope’, on the exclusionary nature of immigration and border policies continues to be screened around the world. She continues to focus on developing critical documentaries for transformative social change and helping out grassroots campaigns for justice.

 

January 31, 2013

CSR & Labour in Developing Countries: ILO's Better Work Programme as New Governance Form (a Ryerson CSR Institute talk)

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a talk on “CSR & Labour in Developing Countries: ILO’s Better Work Programme as a New Governance Form”, with Dr. Kelly Pike. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson Law Research Centre, the Ryerson Centre for Labour Management Relations, the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA), the Ryerson MBA CSR Student Committee, and the Ryerson Bachelor of Commerce Corporate Social Responsibility Students Association (CSRSA).

Research on the complexity of global value chains indicates that it is becoming increasingly difficult to monitor compliance with labour standards. Buyers communicate with sub-contractors who shop around the world for low-cost suppliers, who themselves are sourcing materials from other countries to lower their costs of production. The industries in these countries are vulnerable to trade fluctuations, the workers are vulnerable to exploitation, and governments are often slow to step up for fear of losing investments. Embracing these complexities, the ILO’s Better Work Programme (part of the Social Dialogue Sector) has emerged as a leader in the field of social regulation.

Different from other forms of regulation, Better Work facilitates social dialogue around economic and social policy between global buyers and the supplier country’s government, manufacturers, and unions. The key question driving Better Work’s efforts is how to improve compliance without negatively impacting competitiveness. Sporadic visits from buyers, and the short-term fixes that follow, are costly for employers and ineffective at leading to sustained improvements in labour standards for workers. Better Work takes a more systematic approach than previous CSR efforts, engaging in root cause analysis, utilizing a comprehensive assessment tool, and involving front-line workers in the monitoring and evaluation process.

Utilizing the concept of a ‘governance deficit’, this talk traces the evolution of attempts at labour standards enforcement through means of national law and labour codes, international core labour standards, buyer codes of conduct, and the recent rollout of Better Work. Drawing on the speaker’s work for Better Work Lesotho that provided a baseline of working conditions before the programme was launched, this talk will highlight what the Better Work programme is, and how it differs systematically from other forms of social regulation. This will include a discussion of how Better Work engages stakeholders, how compliance assessments are conducted, and what some of the current research on Better Work implies for the future of regulating labour in global value chains.

Speaker bio:

Dr. Pike did her PhD in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY. Her dissertation focused on examining the factors that lead to variation in workers’ perceptions of compliance in Lesotho’s clothing industry. As part of her fieldwork, she spent two years living in South Africa and traveling frequently to Lesotho where she was also employed as an independent contractor for the ILO, collecting baseline data for a before-and-after study of Better Work. Kelly has recently returned to Canada for post-doctoral research with Leah Vosko at York. There, she is working on building a global employment standards database, comparing employment standards enforcement across Canada, the US, UK and Australia. Kelly also teaches the Negotiations course at Woodsworth College, and works as a part-time consultant for the World Bank, doing comparative research on labour standards compliance in Lesotho and Kenya’s clothing industries.

Date / Time: Thursday, January 31, from 12 noon to 1 pm.  Please be seated by 12 noon.

Location:  Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, 9th floor, room 3-099

Seating Limited: Register early

To register, click on this link:  www.ryerson-csr-institute-labour-ILO.eventbrite.ca

For more information regarding this event, and the Ryerson CSR Institute, go to: www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute or contact: kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

February 12, 2013

Ryerson CSR Institute a research partner for “Sustainable/Responsible Supply Chain Roundtable” at Ryerson:

RESEARCHERS EXPLORE WAYS CANADIAN COMPANIES CAN SUSTAINABLY PARTNER WITH DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

The Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University and TFO Canada team up to develop best practices for Canadian retailers

TORONTO/OTTAWA Jan 8, 2013 --- How can Canadian companies develop stronger economic ties with developing countries while promoting sustainable development and reducing poverty in those regions? 

That is the heart of an innovative research project supported by Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management (TRSM) and the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility. The six-month project involves an examination of a number of initiatives worldwide where international retailers and manufacturers partnered with international development institutions to advance sustainable economic development and reduce poverty.

There is growing recognition of the value of “trade, not aid“ to address developing country’s social and environmental issues, says Kernaghan Webb, director of TRSM’s Institute of the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and a professor in TRSM’s Department of Law and Business. “Retailers are increasingly addressing the environmental and social impacts of their supply-chain as part of their corporate social responsibility policies, thus creating opportunities for partnerships with developing country producers,” says Webb. “Research has revealed a number of innovative partnerships that have enhanced the economic livelihood of developing country partners, reduced environmental impacts and improved the health and welfare of communities.”

Researchers are examining 30 development projects or initiatives that feature this type of private sector partnership in developing countries such as Malawi, Pakistan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.  While most are financed by the donor community, many are initiated and in some cases fully financed by the multinational actors involved.  Nearly all of the projects also involve a development intermediary, typically a local or international non-government organization who provides technical assistance for the producer communities in the developing country. 

“The private sector – with their innovation, expertise and financial resources – has an important role to play in development, be it through core business activities or corporate social responsibility efforts,” says the Honourable Julian Fantino, Canada’s Minister of International Cooperation. ”To reach our development objectives and to reduce global poverty, development efforts must capitalize on all available resources and players.”

The six month research project was led by TFO Canada, a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering trade for developing countries, with funds from the Canadian International Development Agency, and done in collaboration with the North-South Institute.

“So far, our preliminary research has found over two dozen examples of large retailers and other multinational firms getting directly involved in international development projects that support their overseas suppliers,” says Brian Mitchell, executive director of TFO Canada. “Corporate social responsibility is all about doing the right thing in decision making and action, while making a profit.”

Mitchell says in the next phase of this project, researchers will share best practices and challenges from these projects (most of which are with European and American firms) with the Canadian private sector and the Canadian international development community.

A roundtable discussion will be held at Ryerson’s Ted Rogers School of Management on February 12 to share the results of the research project with Canadian industry leaders in retailing and importing. For more information concerning the roundtable, contact Brian Mitchell at:  brian.mitchell@tfocanada.ca

About TFO Canada
TFO Canada (www.tfocanada.ca) is a non-profit organization established by the Canadian government in 1980, and which now operates as a non-government organization with funding from CIDA and other sources, to help developing country exporters access the Canadian import market.  TFO Canada also undertakes a variety of trade-related capacity building projects for developing country businesses and trade support institutions in several countries in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean and Latin America.

About the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility
The Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is located in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University. The Institute seeks to advance CSR research, recognizing that increasingly, CSR issues are drivers for change in the business community. The goal of the Institute is to promote the Institute and Ryerson University as a centre of excellence in research and peer-reviewed publications on CSR issues, to increase research and understanding on these issues and thereby also increase research productivity in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University, and to develop practical solutions. For further information, visit:www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute

About Ryerson University
Ryerson University is Canada's leader in innovative, career-oriented education and a university clearly on the move. With a mission to serve societal need, and a long-standing commitment to engaging its community, Ryerson offers more than 100 undergraduate and graduate programs. Distinctly urban, culturally diverse and inclusive, the university is home to more than 30,000 students, including 2,300 master's and PhD students, nearly 2,700 faculty and staff, and more than 140,000 alumni worldwide. Research at Ryerson is on a trajectory of success and growth: externally funded research has doubled in the past four years. The G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education is Canada's leading provider of university-based adult education. For more information, visit www.ryerson.ca

About Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)

CIDA is Canada's lead agency for development assistance. CIDA's aim is to manage Canada's support and resources effectively and accountably to achieve meaningful, sustainable results. CIDA’s focus is also to engage in policy development in Canada and internationally, enabling Canada’s international development effort to realize its objectives. For more information, visit www.acdi-cida.gc.ca   

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Suelan Toye

Public Affairs, Ryerson University

Office: 416-979-500 x 7161

stoye@ryerson.ca

@RyersonU

Brian Mitchell

Executive Director, TFO Canada

Office: 613-233-3925 x 31

brian.mitchell@tfocanada.ca

Media Relations Office 
Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) 
Telephone: 819-953-6534 
media@acdi-cida.gc.ca 
@CIDA_CA

February 13, 2013

Sustainability Thought-Leaders Symposium: “Environmental, Social, and Economic Sustainability in Challenging Times –Exploring the Options.”

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of CSR is pleased to co-sponsor the Chang School’s “Sustainability Thought-Leaders Symposium”, on February 13, from 7:30 – 10:30 pm, at Ryerson University. There is no fee for admission. The Symposium has been developed by the G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education at Ryerson University. The topic of this year’s symposium is:  “Environmental, Social, and Economic Sustainability in Challenging Times –Exploring the Options.”

The 2013 symposium will include a panel of three keynote speakers who will speak about this year’s topic, followed by a panel discussion and a Q&A session.  The three speakers are all professors at Ryerson University:  Professor Alex Ferworn (School of Computer Science); Professor Mark Gorgolewski (Department of Architectural Science) and Professor Kernaghan Webb (Dept of Law & Business, Ted Rogers School of Management).

The Sustainability Thought-Leaders Symposium is organized by the Certificate in Sustainability Management program. The Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to be a co-sponsor of this event (www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute). For more information about the symposium or the Certificate in Sustainability Management please visit www.ryerson.ca/ce/sustain.

Date:          Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Time:          7:30 p.m.–10:00 p.m.

Location:     The Chang School, Ryerson University, Heaslip House, Peter Bronfman Learning Centre,  7th Floor

RSVP:         www.ryerson.ca/ce/changschoolevents

February 28, 2013

Deadline for Emond Montgomery Business Ethics/CSR Case Competition

Ryerson CSR Institute supports Emond Montgomery Business Ethics/CSR Case Competition (deadline:  February 28).

Emond Montgomery Publications has launched a written case study analysis competition, inviting university and college students from across Canada to assess a case study using the skills they have gained from business ethics and CSR classes. Participating students will submit a written analysis of a case study by February 28, 2013. A panel of leading Canadian CSR and business ethics professors will review the submissions and name the winning entries. The winners will present their work at an event co-hosted by Emond Montgomery and Ryerson University’s Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility in Toronto in spring 2013. The winning pieces will be professionally edited and published as free ebooks on Emond Montgomery’s website.

For more information concerning the competition, please go to: http://www.emp.ca/higher-education/business-ethics-case-study-competition.html




March 6, 2013

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to co-sponsor an event on Latin American Civil Society-Mining Industry Dialogue re: Engagement at the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada (PDAC) Convention, on March 6, from 9:00am – 12:00 noon, at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, North Building, Room 206DC.
 
A coalition of groups from Latin American countries including Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru has been formed, known as the GDL (Grupo de Diálogo Minería, Democracia y Desarrollo  Sostenible en Latinoamérica – Mining, Democracy and Sustainable Development Dialogue Group in LatinAmerica). The aim of the GDL is to create a space for multi-stakeholder dialogues and to promote opportunities of mutual understanding with regards to mining, environmental stewardship and sustainable development. The GDL brings together key leaders from national and regional NGOs, local communities, mining industry representatives, consulting firms, municipalities, regional and national governments, and autonomous institutions. The GDL aspires to strengthen the relationship among stakeholders to create trust without defending any particular interests.
 
The GDL started out as the Mining Dialogue Group of Peru (GDM) whose 10 years of experience helping stakeholders from the mining industry engage into closer relationships expanded into Latin America to transform conflict and contribute to sustainable development.  
 
This special session during the PDAC convention will provide the opportunity to engage with government officials and civil society from Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador and Peru, as well as exchange experiences with exploration and mining companies operating in these countries.
 
The session is open to all, including mining industry and service representatives from junior and senior mining companies with operations in Latin America (senior management, operators, community relations personnel), community leaders, academics, NGOs and government officials.

Date and Time: March 6, 9 am to 12 noon.

Location: Metro Toronto Convention Centre, North Building, Room 206DC.
 
There is no admission for this event, but space is limited.  To register, please contact:  Bernarda Elizalde, at bernardaelizalde02@gmail.com


 
March 21, 2013

Discussion on Sustainability in the Fasion Industry

“Sustainability

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with Ryerson University student organizations as partners (the Ryerson MBA Student CSR Committee; the Ryerson Bachelor of Commerce Corporate Social Responsibility Students Association (CSRSA); and the Ryerson Environmental Science and Management Graduate Students Association), is pleased to present a discussion by researchers on:  “Sustainability in the Fashion Industry:  Making the Connections, or a Contradiction in Terms?”

Sustainability plays an increasing role in today’s fashion industry. Designers, manufacturers and researchers are starting to realize that they need to look deeper into the fashion supply chain and business models to address sustainability and social responsibility in the making of fashion products and in the end-fashion products themselves.  The challenges are great. The textile industry is pollution-intensive, accounting for 5% of all landfill waste with an astounding 12 million tons of discarded textiles generated in North America each year. Many of the least-developed countries in the world remain dependant on the apparel sector; however, many garment workers in these countries struggle to earn a livable wage, work long hours under poor conditions, and lack freedom of association in the workplace. 

The research presented at this event discusses the connections between sustainability and fashion, explores some of the innovative ways the apparel sector is addressing environmental, social and economic impacts and examines how sustainability and social responsibility can function to create a competitive advantage.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 21, 2013, from 12 noon to 2 pm. Please be seated by 12 noon.

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, 9th floor, room TRS 3-119.

There is no fee for admission but space is limited, so register early (registration details below).

The session consists of four speakers: three presentations on research by Ryerson graduate students, as well as a presentation by a non-profit organization dedicated to improving sustainability in fashion.

The speakers are:

Sarah Portway (Masters of Arts in Fashion, Ryerson 2012)

"Regenerative Abundance: Fast and Sustainable Fashion Production in Toronto"

Fast fashion has dominated the retail industry in the last 10 years and these production practices have had a dramatic negative impact on local designers and our planet.  This informative talk will focus on how Toronto designers can spring back from these impacts, take back their apparel clients all while also improving the overall health of our eco-system and community.

Kirsten Schaefer (Masters of Arts in Fashion, Ryerson 2012)

“The Sustainable Bride”

Due to minimum use and maximum production efforts, the white wedding gown is perhaps the most wasteful garment on the market. This research uses creative pattern cutting techniques to maximize garment use and eliminate waste for a more sustainable bridal design.

Anne Pringle (Masters of Environmental Management and Science Candidate, Ryerson 2013)

“Voluntary Environmental and Social Initiatives in the Fashion Industry”

Voluntary initiatives are increasingly being used to address the environmental and social impacts of consumer products, yet consumer awareness of the more sustainable clothing options remains comparatively low. This presentation discusses some existing and emerging voluntary initiatives targeting the apparel sector, illuminates some shortcomings of the existing voluntary initiatives and makes suggestions for reform. Research will focus on issues such as how voluntary initiatives are understood at both the industry and consumer level and the potential role designers, retailers, consumers and the general public can play in shaping industry sustainability standards.

Kelly Drennan (Founder/President), or Sarah Kear (Board Member) Fashion Takes Action

Fashion Takes Action (FTA) is Canada's only non-profit organization that focuses on sustainability and social responsibility in the fashion industry. FTA works with both industry and the general public, with the goal to shift behaviour toward more positive social and environmental impacts. 

 

November 29, 2012

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to sponsor the following talk:

“Strengthening the Aboriginal-Business Connection:  Learning from the CCAB experience” – Jean Paul Gladu, President and CEO, Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB).

Mr. Gladu will speak on how to optimally leverage assets between Corporate Canada and Aboriginal Businesses through common sense tools to create market space, decrease risk and create net value. 

Mr. Gladu, President and CEO of CCAB, is Anishinaabe from Thunder Bay with over 20 years working experience on Aboriginal issues from the view of government, industry, non-government and First Nation lenses.  He holds an undergraduate degree from the Native American Forestry Program from the University of Northern Arizona and an Executive MBA from Queens.

The Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business (CCAB) is a national member-based business organization designed to drive business opportunities and enable sustainable relationships. The members include Aboriginal businesses, Aboriginal community owned economic development corporations, and companies operating in Canada.  Among other things, CCAB has developed and administers the CCAB Progressive Aboriginal Relations (PAR) certification program, which recognizes and supports continuous improvement in Aboriginal relations.  It is described by CCAB as the premier certification program of its type in the world, assisting companies achieve greater results.

Date: Thursday 29 November 2012

Time: 3:00 to 4:30 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of School of Management, Ryerson Unviersity, 55 Dundas West, Toronto, in room TRS 3-129 (ninth floor).

Doors open at 2:30 pm. The event begins promptly at 3:00 pm. Please arrive on time.

There is no cost for this event, but seating is limited. 

TO REGISTER CLICK HERE:  www.aboriginal-business-csr.eventbrite.ca

Or contact Dr. Kernaghan Webb: kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

For more complete information on upcoming Ryerson CSR Institute events and other activities, visit our website: www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute  

To subscribe to the Ryerson CSR Institute email list, email: Kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca and put “subscribe” in the subject heading

To unsubscribe, email: Kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca, and put “unsubscribe” in the subject heading. 

November 16, 2012

The Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with the support of the Ryerson CSR Students Association and the Ryerson MBA CSR Committee, is pleased to sponsor the following talk:

“Global norms and corporate social responsibility in the mining sector”- Hevina S. Dashwood - Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Brock University 

Drawing on her recently published book, The Rise of Global Corporate Social Responsibility:  Mining and the Spread of Global Norms (Cambridge, 2012),  Dr. Dashwood’s talk will focus on an account of the conditions that led to unilateral and collaborative CSR adoption in the mining sector, as well as the theoretical underpinnings for this adoption.   Professor Dashwood’s broad research interests encompass private global governance, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and international development.  Her current research program is concerned with CSR adoption in the global mining sector, the dissemination of global standards specific to mining and the translation of global CSR standards at the local level in the developing country context.

This event will be held on November 16, from 3:00 to 4:30 pm, at the Ryerson University Ted Rogers School of School of Management, 55 Dundas West, in TRS 1-073 (seventh floor).

Doors open at 2:30 pm.  Please arrive on time.  The event will start promptly at 3:00 pm.

There is no cost for this event, but seating is limited.  Register at: www.csrnormsmining.eventbrite.ca

November 2, 2012

Mining in developing countries: an environmental perspective

As part of the series of public discussions developed through the Learning Partnership arrangement between the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR and the federal Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor, on Friday, November 2, 2012, from 3:00 pm to 4:30 pm, Steve Price from WWF-Canada (the World Wildlife Fund-Canada) will speak on “Mining in developing countries: an environmental perspective.”  

Date: Friday, November 2, 2012

Time: 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm (please be on time, doors open at 2:30 p.m. Event starts promptly at 3:00 pm)

Venue: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

Address: 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto

Room: TRS 3-129 (ninth floor)

Cost: No admission, but please register early as seats are limited. 

To register: http://ryerson-csr-institute-mining-envt.eventbrite.ca/  

Or contact Dr. Kernaghan Webb: kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

October 30, 2012

When Canada Meets the World: The Precautionary Principle

How the guiding principle of the 1992 Rio Convention founded an extraordinary partnership of forestry companies and environmentalists determined to protect the boreal forest and caribou habitat.

Featured Speakers: Dr. Alex Wellington, Ryerson University
Janet Summer, Executive Director, CPAWS Wildlands League
Michael Lessard, Vice-President, Forest Resource Management, Tembec Inc.

Date: Tuesday, October 30, 2012.

Time: 8:00 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Registration and light breakfast at 7:30 a.m.

Place: Cara Commons, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, TRS1-148, 7th Floor, 55 Dundas St. West, Toronto, ON

Co-hosted by: the Ryerson Law Research Centre, the Centre for Labour Management and Relations, and the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility

Registration fee of $30.00 for the general public. No charge for Ryerson faculty, staff or students.

Can be paid at the door or by cheque. Cheque can be mailed to Ryerson Law Research Centre, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 2K3.

Spaces are limited. Please RSVP to lawcentre@ryerson.ca

October 29, 2012

Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law: Examining the Connections for Canadian Corporations

A panel discussion brought to you by the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA) in collaboration with the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, and Fasken Martineau LLP.

Some maintain that corporate social responsibility is simply voluntary action by firms, and so therefore “the law” has no role.  Others suggest that there is a more complex and nuanced relationship between law and CSR, involving considerable overlap and complementarity.  The relationship between CSR and the law plays out differently here in Canada than it does at the international level.  In light of the limitations of international public law, the connections between CSR and the law in the global arena is particularly important.  These issues and more will be discussed on Monday October 29th when RCGA is joined by our panel of experts, including Claudia Feldkamp (Associate, Fasken Martineau) and Dr. Kernaghan Webb (Associate Professor, Department of Law and Business, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University and Director, Ryerson Institute of the Study of CSR), from 6-8pm at the prestigious Bay Adelaide Centre.

Date: Monday 29 October 2012

Time: 6 – 8 pm

Place: the offices of Fasken Martineau, Bay Adelaide Centre (corner of Bay and Adelaide), 24th floor.

As space is extremely limited we encourage you to register immediately: http://csrandthelaw.eventbrite.ca/

To subscribe to the Ryerson CSR Institute email list, email: Kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca and put “subscribe” in the subject heading

To unsubscribe, email: Kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca, and put “unsubscribe” in the subject heading.  

October 19, 2012

“Institutional Theory and CSR”

As part of the 2012 Business Ethics Speakers' Series at the Ted Rogers School of Management, and in collaboration with the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR, we are pleased to announce that Professor Dirk Matten, Hewlett-Packard Chair in Corporate Social Responsibility at the Schulich School of Business will speak at Ryerson on October 19 on the relevance of institutional theory to Corporate Social Responsibility. 

Date: Friday, October 19, 2012

Time: 12:00 to 1:15 pm

Place: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, in room TRS 3-099. 

There is no admission fee, but please register if you plan to attend, as space is limited.  Also, a light lunch will be served and accurate numbers will help with planning.  To register, go to: http://www.eventbrite.ca/event/4390933400

 

September 21, 2012

 Andreas Souvaliotis

"From Sustainability Startup to Mainstream Success and Beyond: the AIRMILES for Social Change Story," with Founder Andreas Souvaliotis

Read the notes Mr. Souvaliotis prepared for his presentation here >>

The Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, with the support of three Ryerson business student associations (the Ryerson Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association, the Ryerson MBA CSR Sub-Committee, and the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association), is pleased to announce a presentation by Mr. Andreas Souvaliotis, founder of Green Rewards, and later AIRMILES for Social Change, the world’s first national environmental and healthy lifestyle incentive programs.

The presentation will take place Friday, September 21, 2012, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm, at the Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, located at 55 Dundas West, in room TRS 3-129. Admission is free but space is limited.  To register, go to: http://ryerson-csr.eventbrite.ca

Among other things, the presentation by Mr. Souvaliotis will discuss the path from the spark of a sustainability idea, to the evolving issues associated with creating and growing a viable business, addressing the challenges along the way such as protecting intellectual property, raising capital for a social venture, building a business team, transitioning from an initial business to a unit associated with a major player such as AIRMILES, evolving the product and the role of the founder in a larger firm, and finally moving beyond  AIRMILES for Social Change to new challenges.

The achievements of Mr. Souvaliotis in influencing and rewarding behaviour change on a mass scale have been recognized by global social responsibility leaders, including The Prince of Wales. As a leading social entrepreneur in Canada, Andreas writes and speaks across the country about social change and innovation as well as the emerging shared-value model. He was trained by former US Vice President and Nobel laureate Al Gore and he chairs the national advisory committee on climate change for WWF Canada.  He also chairs the advisory board of the Centre for Responsible Leadership at Queen's School of Business and serves on several other academic and non-profit boards. He is a very active member of the Young Presidents’ Organization, where he has served as national membership chair for Canada and chair of the Toronto chapter.  He holds a MBA degree from McMaster University and a Bachelor of Science degree from Brandon University.  

From Sustainability Startup to Mainstream Success and Beyond: the AIRMILES for Social Change Story,

 

May 4, 2012

Understanding Canada's National Contact Point for the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises: Recent Developments and Experiences

The Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, Ryerson University and the federal Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor established a learning partnership on CSR and the extractive sector overseas, building a neutral platform to contribute to informed public discussion of important issues related to corporate social responsibility of mining, oil and gas companies, and enhancing cross-sector networking opportunities for those interested in these questions.   

Our series of public seminars continues with an interactive dialogue with Judith St. George, Chair of Canada’s National Contact Point (NCP) for the OECD Guidelines for Multi-National Enterprises. The discussion will include: recent revisions to the Guidelines; how Canada’s NCP is organized and lessons learned; and how the NCP fits in with the Government of Canada’s CSR strategy for the Canadian international extractive sector.

Date: May 4, 2012

Time: 10:30 am -12:00 pm

Location: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Room TRS 3-129 (ninth floor)

Chair: Marketa Evans, CSR Counsellor

There is no charge to attend but seating is limited. Please RSVP to Matthew Armstrong at matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca .

About the speaker

Judith St. George is Director General of the Trade Commissioner Service Operations Bureau at the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.  In her current capacity she is Chair of Canada's National Contact Point for the OECD Guidelines for Multi-National Enterprises.  She has previously worked as a trade commissioner in the USA, Malaysia, the Philippines and the United Kingdom, and has served as Consul General for Canada in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

 

April 20, 2012

The Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, the Ryerson Centre for Labour Management Relations, and the Ryerson Law Research Centre are pleased to present:

“Labour, Corporate Social Responsibility and the Law in Canada: what do recent Canadian court decisions tell us?” with guest speaker Professor Roy Adams

Ryecast now available -- view here

While firms claim to be socially responsible to their workers, reports of fierce labour disputes abound. Not surprisingly, workers have turned to the courts for protection. What do our courts really say about Charter rights for organized labour?  Does the Charter protect collective bargaining or the right to strike? If so, how?  What are the duties of employers and employees?

From the Supreme Court decision in B.C. Health Services to Fraser and beyond, renowned labour law scholar Dr. Roy Adams will explore and explain where Canada’s labour law stands and what it means for employers, labour and the public.

Join us for an animated lecture followed by a light lunch, featuring globally recognized industrial relations expert, Dr. Roy Adams (this is a “no cost” event,  but space is limited, so please register immediately as per the below information).

Time/Location:

Friday April 20, 2012

Ted Rogers School of Management

55 Dundas Street West

Room: TRS 3-129 (ninth floor)

Registration: 10:00 AM – 10:30 AM

Lecture: 10:30 AM – 12 noon

Lunch:

12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Room TRS 1-003 (seventh floor)

Space is limited, so please register as soon as possible at http://csr-labour.eventbrite.com/

For further information concerning the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR, and for information concerning this event, please contact:  matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca

April 18, 2012

A CSR Pledge for Ryerson BComm and MBA students?

Should Ryerson Bachelor of Commerce and MBA Students Sign a CSR Pledge? 

Join Professor Kernaghan Webb, Director of the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, Chad Hogan, President of the Ryerson CSR Student Association (BComm level), and Colin Kee, Co-Founder of the Ryerson MBA CSR Committee, for an exploratory discussion of this topic.  The event will take place from 11 am to 12 noon, on Wednesday, April 18, in Ryerson TRS-1-119 (location details below). Registration is required.  

Many questions surround the issue of a student CSR pledge, such as:

  • If students sign on to a CSR pledge, is it just an empty gesture – basically, words with no action?
  • Would adherence to the terms of a CSR pledge potentially conflict with business obligations to make a profit?
     
  • What exactly would a Ryerson CSR pledge say?
     
  • What does academic research say about the value of such pledges? How does it compare with industry CSR commitments?
  • Would the CSR pledge be voluntary or mandatory for students? 
  • Is there any way of monitoring CSR pledge compliance and enforcing it?  

These are just a few of the questions that will be explored at the session. Join the discussion! 

This event is jointly sponsored by the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR, the Ryerson CSR Student Association, and the Ryerson MBA CSR Committee.

Details:

Discussion takes place Wednesday, April 18, 11 am to 12 noon.

Location:

Ted Rogers School of Management

Ryerson University

55 Dundas Street West

Toronto, Ontario

Room TRS 1-119 (seventh floor)

Seating is limited, so please email matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca to register.

April 2, 2012

"CSR, Ethics, Sustainability, or Corporate Citizenship?  Finding a
Path Through the Moral Vocabulary Jungle" -- a talk by Dr. Chris MacDonald, Ryerson Visiting Professor


As part of its "CSR Research in Progress" series, in which ongoing or recently completed CSR research by Ryerson University professors and others is presented for discussion, the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility is pleased to present a talk on "CSR, Ethics, Sustainability, or Corporate Citizenship? Finding a Path Through the Moral Vocabulary Jungle" on Monday, April 2, 2012, from 12 noon until 1 pm (location below). This event is co-sponsored by the Ryerson CSR Student Association.

Words  abound for describing a company's commitment to doing the right thing. How is a company to choose? This presentation tries to make sense ofthe complexity and suggests a path forward. Professor MacDonald's presentation builds on recent research he has undertaken, and academic publications on same.

Chris MacDonald, Ph.D., is currently a Visiting Professor at Ryerson University's Ted Rogers School of Management. He has published widely in business ethics and moral philosophy, and is co-author of one of the 3 most-cited papers published in Business Ethics Quarterly in the last decade. He's been called one of the "Top 100 Thought Leaders in Trustworthy Business Behavior" and has been declared one of the "100 Most Influential People in Business Ethics" four years in a row. For more than 6 years he has been the author of The Business Ethics Blog (www.BusinessEthicsBlog.com), the world's #1 blog on that topic.

The session will be held on Monday, April 2, 2012, from 12 noon to 1 pm, at the Ted Rogers School of Management (TRSM), Ryerson University, located at 55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-129 (ninth floor). There is no cost for this session, and everyone is welcome, but space is limited. As the talk will begin at 12 noon sharp, it is important that attendees are in their seats by 11:59 am. 

To register, please email: matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca

More information concerning the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility can be found on our home page.

February 13, 2012

Stephen Lewis--When the Bottom Line is Not Enough--Event, co-supported by Ryerson CSR Institute.

The Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (Ryerson CSR Institute) is pleased to co-support the last session of the Ryerson Ted Rogers School of Management “Dean’s Signature Speaker Series” for this academic year, featuring Mr. Stephen Lewis, an internationally recognized diplomat and envoy for humanitarian efforts, on Monday, February 13, from 7:30 am to 9:30 am (event details below).  His presentation will be on the role of leadership, with an emphasis on corporate social responsibility, in promoting a different set of economic and social priorities for the 21st century.  Mr. Lewis has been awarded 34 honorary degrees from Canadian universities and was appointed a Companion of the Order of Canada, Canada’s highest honour for lifetime achievement, in 2003.   Each year, the Dean’s Signature Speaker Series provides attendees with an opportunity to engage with a diverse group of Canadian leaders, whose presentations tackle issues of national and international significance.  This event has a registration fee (breakfast will be served). To register, please go to:

http://trs-signature.eventbrite.com/

If you have any questions or would like more information on initiatives at the Ted Rogers School of Management, please contact trs.series@ryerson.ca.

Event details are as follows:

Monday, February 13, 2012

7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.

7th Floor, Cara Commons, Ted Rogers School of Management, 55  Dundas St.                 West, Toronto

Itinerary: [Breakfast will be served]

7:30 a.m. to 7:45 a.m.  --  Arrival and introductions

7:45 a.m. to 8:15 a.m.  --  Breakfast

8:15 a.m. to 8:45 a.m.  --  Presentation

8:45 a.m. to 9:20 a.m.  --  Group discussion

9:20 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.  --  Closing remarks

The Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR presents a number of other events, including an upcoming session where the World Bank Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman Ombudsman will speak on “Company-community dialogue & conflict resolution: Reflecting on 10 years of the work of the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman” (co-sponsored with the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor, on January 26) and a “CSR Research in Progress” Session on the ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard (on January 27). See below for more information.

January 27, 2012

CSR Research in Progress:  ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard

As part of its series "CSR Research in Progress," in which ongoing or
recently completed CSR research by Ryerson professors and others is
presented for discussion, the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate
Social Responsibility is pleased to present a session concerning the ISO
26000 Social Responsibility Standard, on Friday, January 27, 2012, from 8:30
am to 12:30 pm (location below). 


Published in November, 2010 after five years of deliberation, the ISO 26000
standard was developed through an innovative, publicly accessible, consensus
process.  In 2010, the working group involved 450 participating experts and
210 observers from 99 ISO member countries and 42 liaison organizations,
including:

  • inter-governmental entities such as the United Nations Global
    Compact, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, the
    World Health Organization, UNCTAD, United Nations Environmental Program, and the International Labour Organization;
  • governments from developed and developing countries, including
    Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, former Eastern Bloc
    countries, many EU countries, India, Malaysia, Middle Eastern countries,
    South Africa and other African countries, and the United States;
  • peak global industry associations, including the International Chamber of Commerce, the World Business Council on Sustainable Development,
    the International Organization of Employers, and the International Council
    on Mining and Metals;
  • peak global organized labour representatives from developed and developing countries;
  • peak consumer organizations such as Consumers International;
  • environmental and other NGOs such as the International Institute
    for Sustainable Development, the International Institute for Environment and
    Development, Ecologia, Transparency International, Red Puentes, from
    developed and developing countries;
  • international standards bodies addressing SR issues, including the
    Global Reporting Initiative (GRI), AccountAbility (AA 1000), the Fair Labor
    Association (FLA), ISEAL, and Social Accountability (SA 8000), and national
    standards bodies, as well as consultants and academics from developed and developing countries.

The ISO 26000 standard defines social responsibility (the first time it has
been defined through such a comprehensive global consensus process), and
addresses the full range of SR issues, including human rights, environmental
protection, consumer protection, labour, community development, fair
operating practices, and governance. One of the notable characteristics of
the standard is the fact that ISO, an international non-governmental
standards organization, was able to attract the participation of key
inter-governmental entities, as well as governments, peak industry
associations, labour, consumer, and other NGOs, and standards organizations,
from developed and developing countries, to agree on a comprehensive
international standard articulating what is expected in terms of social
responsibility by all types of organizations anywhere in the world.  It is
perhaps not surprising, then, that the process for development, the
substance of the ISO 26000 standard, and its implications, have become focal
points for academic research.     

The session will involve presentations concerning four papers:

  1. ISO 26000 and "learning organizations" - Professor Kernaghan Webb, Ryerson University (based on a paper originally presented at the
    International Studies Association Conference),
  2. A look at the negotiation process of ISO 26000 --  Professor Wes Helms, Brock University (based on a paper co-authored with Kernaghan Webb and Christine Oliver (Schulich), to be published in the Academy of Management Journal),
  3. ISO 26000 and leveraged-based social responsibility - Professor Stepan Wood, Osgoode Hall Law School (based on a paper to be published in the Business Ethics Quarterly Journal),
  4. ISO 26000, responsibilization and the construction of global SR custom - Professor Kernaghan Webb (based on a paper to be published in a forthcoming monograph of law-oriented papers that is part of the Transnational Business Governance Interactions Project).

The session will be held on January 27, 2012, from 8:30 am to 12:30 pm, at
the Ted Rogers School of Management (TRSM), Ryerson University, located at
55 Dundas West, in Room TRS 3-109.

There is no cost for this session, and everyone is welcome, but space is limited.

Please RSVP to Matthew Armstrong at matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca.

For more information concerning the Ryerson Institute for the Study of
Corporate Social Responsibility, please go to: www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute

January 26, 2012

Dialogue with the World Bank Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman-Ryerson CSR Institute Public Seminar: “Company-community dialogue & conflict resolution: Reflecting on 10 years of the work of the Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman”

CAO Powerpoint slides for the event are available for download here.

The webcast for this event is available at: https://ryecast.ryerson.ca/12/lwatch/1680.aspx

The Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, Ryerson University and the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor established a learning partnership on CSR and the extractive sector overseas, building a neutral platform to contribute to informed public discussion of important issues related to corporate social responsibility of mining, oil and gas companies, and enhancing cross-sector networking opportunities for those interested in these questions. Our series of public seminars continues with an interactive dialogue with Meg Taylor, the World Bank’s Compliance Advisor/Ombudsman (CAO) on January 26, 2012  (event details below).

The CAO is the independent recourse mechanism for projects supported by the private sector agencies of the World Bank Group - the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA). IFC and MIGA promote poverty reduction through private sector development in countries around the world.  When people believe they may be affected negatively by an IFC or MIGA project, they can request help from CAO to address their concerns. The CAO works with all the key parties involved in a project to find real solutions that improve social and environmental outcomes on the ground.

Event details:

January 26, 2012

12:30-1:30PM 

Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, Room TRS 3-119 

There is no charge to attend but seating is limited.

Please RSVP to Matthew Armstrong at matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca.

The Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR presents or co-supports a number of other events accessible to the academic community, the business community and the general public, including a “CSR Research in Progress” Session on the ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard, on January 27, and an upcoming session with Stephen Lewis,“When the Bottom Line is Not Enough” (part of the Ted Rogers School of Management “Dean’s Signature Speaker Series, co-supported by the Ryerson CSR Institute), on February 13. See above for more information.

 

2011 events:

December 8, 2011

CSR & Mining in Latin America: Book Launch/Panel Discussion: Ryerson CSR Institute

Powerpoints from the book launch:

CSR and the Law: Learning from the Experience of Canadian Mining Companies in Latin America

Governance Ecosystems CSR in the Latin American Mining Sector


“Ryerson CSR Institute and Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor Invitation to the fifth in a series of Public Seminars on CSR and the extractive sector”

The Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, Ryerson University and the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor established a learning partnership on CSR and the extractive sector overseas, building a neutral platform to contribute to informed public discussion of important issues related to corporate social responsibility of mining, oil and gas companies, and enhancing cross-sector networking opportunities for those interested in these questions.   

Our series of public seminars continues with the launch of Governance Ecosystems: CSR in the Latin American Mining Sector, a collection of essays co-edited by Dr. Julia Sagebien and Nicole Lindsay. The Ryerson Learning Partnership Event will feature a panel discussion with contributors to the book.

Governance Ecosystems investigates how public, private, and civil society actors impact the design, execution and evaluation of corporate responsibility in the mining sector. It provides a broader view of the myriad relationships and dynamics that can potentially support or disrupt the value that CSR might bring. Using this approach, the book adds a new dimension to the debate about whether mining is good or bad for communities and whether CSR is good or bad for mining firms and their stakeholders – in Latin America, as well as elsewhere in the world.

Event details:  “Book Launch: Governance Ecosystems: CSR in the Latin American Mining Sector” featuring a panel discussion with Editor Dr. Julia Sagebien (Dalhousie) and authors Dr. Kernaghan Webb (Ryerson), Irene Sosa (Jantzi-Sustainalytics), Dr. Hevina Dashwood (Brock) and Dr. Allen  Goss (Ryerson)

December 8, 2011

9:30AM – 11:00AM 

Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

55 Dundas West, Room TRS 3-129 

There is no charge to attend but seating is limited.

To register for this event, please contact: matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca

 

October 12, 2011

Mining and Human Rights Workshop sponsored by Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR

On October 12, 2011, the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility will sponsor the Devonshire Initiative’s all-day workshop on human rights issues in the extractive industry. The workshop will be held at the Ted Rogers School of Management, located at 55 Dundas West in Toronto.

The Devonshire Initiative is a forum for leading international development NGOs and mining companies to come together in response to the emerging social agenda surrounding mining and community development issues. Ryerson Bachelor of Commerce students are being provided the opportunity to attend part of the workshop so that they can learn more about mining and human rights issues. The Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR is sponsoring the event as part of its effort to encourage constructive exploration of key CSR issues facing Canadian businesses. The workshop is fully subscribed.

For further  information concerning the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR, contact the Director of the Institute, Dr. Kernaghan Webb: kernaghan.webb@ryerson.ca

For further information concerning the Devonshire Initiative, contact Alanna Rondi:  alanna@devonshireinitiative.org  

 

April 15, 2011

 “Building a best practice grievance mechanism at the company level” with Paul Warner

This presentation is now available in pdf format (Note: this is a large file--8.8MB--and there may be delays in downloads).

Le francais suit

“Ryerson CSR Institute and Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor Invitation to the Fourth in a series of Public Seminars on CSR and the extractive sector”

The Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, Ryerson University and the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor have established a learning partnership on CSR and the extractive sector overseas, building a neutral platform to contribute to informed public discussion of important issues related to corporate social responsibility of mining, oil and gas companies, and enhancing cross-sector networking opportunities for those interested in these questions.   

 
We are pleased to announce that our series of public seminars will continue with a presentation by Paul Warner, on “Building a best practice grievance mechanism at the company level," drawing on Paul’s vast experience in the mining industry, specifically on community engagement and development issues. 

 

Date: Friday, April 15, 2011

Time: 9:30am – 11:00am 

Place: Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University, 55 Dundas West, 9th Floor, Room 3-119

 

There is no charge to attend but seating is limited. Please RSVP before April 13 to iftin.daud@international.gc.ca

About the speaker:

Paul Warner is Principal Consultant at Both Sides Now Consulting Inc. The mission of Both Sides Now Consulting is, on the one side, to support mining companies that wish to improve their capacity to engage with communities and, on the other side, to support communities that wish to improve their capacity to engage with mining companies. Paul has more than twenty-eight years of experience in the mining industry and has specialized in community engagement and community development since 1997.

His roles have included responsibility for engagement with community stakeholders at the Alumbrera project in Argentina and at the Antamina, La Granja, and Tintaya projects in Peru.  Between 2002 and 2007 he was Community Relations Manager for BHP Billiton's Base Metals group, where his main role was to build the capacity of the group's community professionals to engage effectively.

In 2008 and 2009, he held the same position for BHP Billiton globally, providing support to operations and projects in Colombia, Guatemala, Suriname, Guinea, Burundi, Gabon and the Democratic Republic of Congo.  More recently, he was Manager of Social Responsibility at Carbones del Cerrejón in northern Colombia, the world’s largest open pit coal mine.  Paul has successfully developed community engagement and conflict resolution processes built on fostering trust, understanding and cooperation.  He speaks Spanish and French and has BA and BEd degrees from the University of Toronto and an MBA from Sacred Heart University in Bridgeport, Connecticut.


Information sur le séminaire « Building a best practice grievance mechanism at the company level «, avec M. Paul Warner

 « Invitation de l’Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility de l’Université Ryerson et du Bureau du conseiller en RSE de l’industrie extractive à la quatrième activité d’une série de séminaires publics sur la RSE et l’industrie extractive «

L’Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility de l’Université Ryerson et le Bureau du conseiller en responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE) de l’industrie extractive ont établi un partenariat d’apprentissage sur la RSE et l’industrie extractive à l’étranger. Ils ont mis en place un cadre neutre qui permettra de prendre part à des discussions publiques éclairées sur des enjeux importants liés à la responsabilité sociale des entreprises minières, pétrolières et gazières, ainsi que d’accroître les possibilités de réseautage intersectorielles pour les personnes qui s’intéressent à ces questions.

Nous sommes heureux d’annoncer que notre série de séminaires publics se poursuivra avec un exposé de M. Paul Warner intitulé « Building a best practice grievance mechanism at the company level « (« L’établissement d’un mécanisme de règlement des griefs fondé sur des pratiques exemplaires pour les entreprises «), qui repose sur la vaste expérience de M. Warner dans l’industrie minière, plus particulièrement en ce qui a trait au développement des collectivités et à l’établissement d’un dialogue avec elles.

 

Le vendredi 15 avril 2011

De 9 h 30 à 11 h

Ted Rogers School of Management, Université Ryerson

55, rue Dundas Ouest, 9e étage, salle 3-119

 

La participation au séminaire est gratuite, mais le nombre de places est limité. Veuillez confirmer votre présence d’ici le 13 avril en envoyant un courriel à l’adresse iftin.daud@international.gc.ca.

 

À propos du conférencier

M. Paul Warner est un expert-conseil principal chez Both Sides Now Consulting Inc. La mission de Both Sides Now Consulting consiste, d’une part, à soutenir les entreprises minières qui cherchent à améliorer leur capacité à établir un dialogue avec les collectivités et, d’autre part, à soutenir les collectivités qui cherchent à améliorer leur capacité à établir un dialogue avec les entreprises minières. M. Warner possède plus de 28 années d’expérience dans l’industrie minière et se spécialise dans le dialogue avec les collectivités et le développement des collectivités depuis 1997.

Il a notamment été chargé du dialogue avec des intervenants des collectivités dans le cadre d’un projet d’Alumbrera en Argentine et de projets d’Antamina, de La Granja et de Tintaya au Pérou. De 2002 à 2007, il a occupé le poste de directeur des relations avec les collectivités pour le groupe du secteur des métaux communs chez BHP Billiton. Son rôle consistait principalement à accroître la capacité des spécialistes des relations avec les collectivités de ce groupe à établir un dialogue efficace.

En 2008 et 2009, M. Warner a occupé le même poste pour BHP Billiton dans son ensemble et a ainsi apporté son soutien à des activités et à des projets en Colombie, au Guatemala, au Suriname, en Guinée, au Burundi, au Gabon et en République démocratique du Congo. Récemment, il a été le directeur de la responsabilité sociale pour Carbones del Cerrejón, la société exploite la plus grande mine de charbon à ciel ouvert du monde, située dans le nord de la Colombie. M. Warner a élaboré avec succès des processus fondés sur la promotion de la confiance, de la compréhension et de la collaboration pour l’établissement d’un dialogue avec les collectivités et la résolution des conflits. Il parle espagnol et français, et il est titulaire d’un baccalauréat ès arts et d’un baccalauréat en éducation de l’Université de Toronto, ainsi que d’une maîtrise en administration des affaires de l’Université Sacred Heart à Bridgeport, au Connecticut.

 

December 1, 2010


The Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and the federal Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor are pleased to announce “An Introduction to the Review Process of the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor" with Dr. Marketa Evans, CSR Extractive Sector Counsellor, The session will be Chaired by Dr. Kernaghan Webb, Director of the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR.

 

8:30 Coffee and networking

Presentation and  Q&A 9:00-10:30 am

Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University

55 Dundas West,  7th Floor,  Student Lounge (TRS 1-003)

 

The recently established federal Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor has now developed a  non-judicial process to review CSR issues related to Canadian mining, oil and gas companies operating overseas. Persons/communities can bring complaints concerning alleged problematic overseas activity of Canadian extractive sector firms to the attention of the CSR Extractive Sector Counsellor, and Canadian extractive sector firms can bring complaints concerning allegations that they feel are unfounded to the attention of the CSR Extractive Sector Counsellor. The CSR Extractive Sector Counsellor and its non-judicial redress process represent a governance/public policy innovation by the federal government, intended complements conventional adversarial-based legal approaches.

The purpose of this session is to introduce interested persons to the CSR Extractive Counsellor judicial review process. This is the third in a series of public seminars on CSR and the Canadian extractive sector, co-sponsored by the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility and the federal Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor. The seminars are typically attended by a cross-section of academics/researchers from a variety of disciplines and universities, extractive sector personnel, non-governmental organizations, government officials, consultants, and members of the public. 

News about the learning partnership between the Ryerson CSR Institute and the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor can be viewed here.

 

October 29, 2010 

"CSR & the Law: Learning from the Latin American Experience of Canadian Mining Firms” with Dr Kernaghan Webb

Friday, October 29, 2010
10:30AM – Noon 
Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University
55 Dundas West, 9th Floor, Room 3-154
There is no charge to attend but seating is very limited. Please RSVP before October 25 to matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca
 

Dr. K. Webb, Founding Director of the CSR Institute, will present his recent research and review current CSR-oriented legal disputes involving Canadian mining companies in Latin America, as a way of highlighting both the challenges associated with the legal regime and opportunities for proactive environmental, social, and economic practices by Canadian mining firms that can go some way towards reducing the likelihood that future legal issues will arise with respect to their operations.  

Dr. Kernaghan Webb is an Associate Professor of Law and Business at Ryerson University’s Ted Rogers School of Management, and is the Founding Director of the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility.  He is the project leader for a project developing CSR case studies concerning Canadian extractive companies operating overseas.  He has been the Special Advisor to the United Nations on Global Compact with respect to the development of the ISO 26000 social responsibility standard, and is on the Board of Transparency International Canada and Canadian Business for Social Responsibility. Prior to joining Ryerson University,  Dr. Webb was the Senior Legal Policy Advisor and Chief of Research for the Office of Consumer Affairs, Industry Canada. He has written extensively on CSR, innovative regulatory approaches, including the use of voluntary codes and standards, regulatory offences, the role and regulation of the non-governmental organization.

This is the second in a series of open public seminars hosted by the Ryerson CSR Institute and the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor. It is co-sponsored with Ryerson University's Law Centre.

News about the learning partnership between the Ryerson CSR Institute and the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor can be viewed here.

 

October 29, 2010 

“Blood on the Stone” with Ian Smillie

Friday, October 29, 2010
8:30 Coffee and networking
Presentation and book signing 9:00-10:30 am
Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University
55 Dundas West, 9th Floor, Room 3-154
There is no charge to attend but seating is very limited. Please RSVP before October 25 to matthew.armstrong@ryerson.ca

This is the first in a series of open public seminars hosted by the Ryerson CSR Institute and the Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor.

News about this learning partnership can be viewed here.

We are very pleased to announce that our series of public seminars will kick off with the above presentation and book signing by renowned development expert Ian Smillie. 

Mr. Smillie will discuss his recent book, Blood on the Stone: Greed, Corruption and War in the Global Diamond Trade,  which tells the story of the great diamond cartel and the dangerous pipeline leading from war-torn Africa to the glittering showrooms of Paris, London and New York. It describes the campaign that eventually forced the industry and more than 50 governments to create a global certification system known as the Kimberley Process, aimed at wringing blood diamonds out of the retail trade. It concludes with a sobering assessment of the certification system, which soon became hostage to political chicanery, mismanagement and vested interests. Too important to fail, the Kimberley Process has been hailed as a regulatory model for Africa’s extractive minerals. Behind the scenes, however, it runs the risk of becoming an ineffectual talk shop, standing aside as criminals re-infest the diamond world.

Ian Smillie has lived and worked in Africa and Asia as a teacher, consultant, investigator and writer. For the past ten years his focus has been blood diamonds, the wars they fuelled and the campaign designed to stop them. This has taken him from the jungles of West Africa to the backstreets of Antwerp and a war crimes tribunal in The Hague, where he was the first witness in the trial of Liberian warlord Charles Taylor. He was a leading NGO participant in the Kimberley Process from its inception until he resigned in 2009. Ian Smillie was appointed to the Order of Canada in 2003. 

 


June 23, 2010

Federal CSR Counsellor, Ryerson CSR Institute and Ryerson Law Centre Co-Host Second Legal Session

On June 23, 2010, the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and Ryerson Law Centre, together with the federal Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor,  is co-hosting a second session at Ryerson University to explore some of the legal issues associated with the Counsellor’s role.  The Office of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor was established to resolve CSR disputes related to Canadian extractive sector companies operating outside of Canada, in a timely and transparent manner.  On October 19, 2009, Dr. Marketa Evans was appointed as the federal Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor. 

On May 6, 2010, the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR hosted a productive first session. At that session a cross section of CSR legal experts from the private sector, government, civil society, and academia identified and discussed a wide range of legal issues associated with the Counsellor’s role. In preparation for the first session, Dr. Evans stated that “[d]iscussions I’ve had with a number of different individuals and groups suggest a strong willingness on the part of academics, civil society and industry to actively play a part in the Office of the CSR Counsellor. I am grateful to the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR for providing my Office with the opportunity to explore the legal issues associated with my Office in a neutral and informed academic setting.”

Dr. Kernaghan Webb, Professor in the Department of Law and Business at the Ted Rogers School of Management, and Director of the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR, has described the federal Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor as “an example of the sort of innovative governance institution that Canada needs to explore, as we address the CSR challenges of the 21st century. The Institute was established to bring together government, private sector and civil society actors and academics to find workable solutions, so we are glad to be of assistance to Dr. Evans and her Office.” 

“This session builds nicely on existing work the Institute has been doing on collaborative multiperspective CSR case studies of Canadian mining companies operating overseas,” said Dr. Webb.

“As the work of the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor progresses, I know we will have further opportunities to work with Dr. Webb and the Institute, and I’m looking forward to them,” said Dr. Evans.

Dr. Webb chaired the initial May 6 session, and will also chair the June 23 session. The purpose of the second session is to follow up on items discussed in a preliminary manner at the first session. 

For further information concerning the federal  Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor, visit the Counsellor’s website at: www.international.gc.ca/csr_counsellor-conseiller_rse/index.aspx or contact Iftin Daud: Iftin .Daud@international.gc.ca (Phone: 416-973-2064)

For further information concerning the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR, visit the Institute website at: www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute or contact:  Dr. Revital Goldhar, at revital.goldhar@ryerson.ca (Phone: 416-979-5000 ext. 2153).
 

June 15, 2010

Ryerson CSR Institute Co-Hosts Greening Retail Session

On June 15, 2010, the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), together with the Ryerson Centre for the Study of Commercial Activity (CSCA) and the Greening Retail Program, will co-host a session with leaders from the Canadian retail sector to explore the feasibility and desirability of developing Greening Retail guidelines for the Canadian retail and shopping centre sectors. The work builds on a feasibility study prepared by the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR and the CSCA.

“We are happy to be involved in this project, and glad to see the interest from the retail sector in exploring ways of assisting merchants to lessen their negative environmental impact in all their activities,” said D

Bookmark with: Digg Facebook Twitter del.icio.us Newsvine

 

a picture of a leaf

Visit our "Ryerson CSR Institute in the News" page


Ryerson CSR Institute Events

 2014

Jan 10: "Ontario’s new Mining Act regime: the Ontario-Aboriginal Interface"

Jan 16-17: Conference: Business, Human Rights and Law in Transnational Context

Jan 20:"Confessions of a Corporate Responsibility mining executive:  What Contributes to CR Success in the Mining Sector?"

Feb 13: "Addressing Homelessness:  Exploring Government, Private Sector and Civil Society Roles"

March 3: "Senate Reform 2014:  What can we Learn from the Constitutional Repatriation Activity of 1982?"

March 17: UNICEF Canada, CSR, & the Canadian Extractive Industry

March 24: rePlan’s Mining-Indigenous experiences in Canada, Africa and Central America

April 4: Measuring mining impacts on communities: Learning from Colombia's Cerrejon Coal Mine

April 7: Resource Revenue Transparency:  The Emerging Canadian Approach

April 14: The Governance Gap: Extractive Industries, Human Rights and the Home State Advantage

April 30: Corrupt and autocratic countries: to engage or to withdraw and isolate? A corporate view, with Sir Mark Moody-Stuart

May 8: Where to from Here: A Canadian Strategy for the UN Principles on Business and Human Rights? Visit the conference web page for details.

May 27: "Latin America, CSR & Standards: A Chilean Perspective" with Dante Pesce

June 27: workshop on new development NGO-business platform