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April 7, 2017: Ryerson CSR Institute Director Chairs Workshop Developing Sharing Economy Guidelines

 

Feb 21,2017: Ryerson CSR Institute Director/Law Professor Heads New International Sharing Economy Initiative

 

February 6, 2017:  Ryerson CSR Institute Director Comments on the Rise of Consumer Boycotts Coinciding Inauguration of New USA President (CBC Radio) 

 

October 25, 2015:  Ryerson CSR Institute Director Comments on Power of Multinationals to Implement Global CSR (Times Colonist)

 

October 6, 2015:  Mid-October CSR Speaking Tour at EU Universities by Ryerson CSR and Law Professor

What started off as a single opportunity to participate in a CSR conference in Stockholm in mid October has turned into seven CSR talks at EU universities for Dr. Kernaghan Webb, Ryerson University Department of Law and Business Professor and Director of the Ryerson University Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility.  “I am looking forward to sharing some of my thoughts on CSR and law topics with EU colleagues, and hearing their views,” said Dr. Webb.  The speaking tour involves a total of seven talks at London Metropolitan University (UK), Martin Luther University (Germany), University of Tilburg (Netherlands), University of Oslo (Norway), and Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at the University of Lund (Sweden).  “North America and Europe have similarities and differences in terms of CSR and law ideas and practices,” said Dr. Webb, “I am grateful for the financial support of Ryerson University and many of these EU universities that has allowed me to undertake this tour and better understand how CSR plays out in different jurisdictions.”   

 

September 30, 2015:  Forestry sustainability and APP take centre stage at Ryerson CSR Institute

 

September 2, 2015: Ryerson CSR Institute Director named Massey College Visiting Scholar

 

August 24, 2015: Spotlight on Ryerson University CSR Institute Associate Philip Walsh

 

August 24, 2015: Spotlight on Ryerson University CSR Institute Associate Rachel Dodds

 

August 24, 2015: Spotlight on Ryerson University CSR Institute Associate Kernaghan Webb

 

 July 27 2015: CSR Institute Director/Law Professor speaks at "Connected Consumer"


The Connected Consumer in 2020: Empowered or Vulnerable?

2015-07-27

In a world where anonymous online reviews can impact business and
anyone with a smartphone can become a rideshare driver, laws to keep
consumers safe in the information marketplace are lagging. In this
marketplace, individuals are free to match their products and services
to consumers in ways that were impossible before the Internet and with
little or no regulation.

“One minute we’re a consumer, and the next minute we’re a service
provider. How do we do that? How do we regulate that?” said Dr.
Kernaghan Webb, Associate Professor of Law and Business at Ryerson
University.

Standards could be an important part of the answer.

Speakers at a recent event hosted by the Standards Council of Canada’s
(SCC) Consumer and Public Interest Panel (CPIP) discussed how
standardization could help consumers reduce the risks when buying and
accessing services online.

 “I don’t think that regulation can be as agile as the information
marketplace,” said Howard Deane, member of the Board of Directors and
Treasurer of the Consumers Council of Canada. “I certainly believe
that standards can tame some of the Wild West atmosphere of online
reviews and reputation.”

Deane hopes his work on standard ISO/NP 20488, Online Consumer Reviews
-- Principles and requirements for collection, moderation and delivery
processes for online consumer reviews, will help guide sites where
consumers rate everything from local eateries to travel destinations.
While many online reviews are helpful, some commenters see them as an
opportunity to abuse a company. This can seriously affect a business
and its reputation. “A study from the Harvard Business School found
that a one star-increase on Yelp can increase the bottom line by 5 to
10 per cent. For restaurants that’s huge,” said Deane.

Reputation is not the only thing impacted by the digital marketplace.
Consumer privacy is affected too.

“A lot of organizations like to rely on privacy policies that are
long, nobody reads them, we all know this,” said Barbara Bucknell,
Director of the Policy and Research Branch of the Office of the
Privacy Commissioner of Canada. “How do we make these better so people
are asked to consent to activities in meaningful ways?”

Lack of privacy is not only a problem online. Smartphones collect data
on the places people go, the number of steps they take and even how
well they drive. François Coallier, Chief Information Officer and
professor at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS) said the large
amounts of data generated by these devices can create security
challenges.

“It’s touching every aspect of our lives these days,” said Coallier.
“Everybody has a supercomputer in their pocket.”

Meanwhile, consumers looking for less expensive alternatives to hotels
and taxis are turning to home and rideshare services like Airbnb and
Uber. While renting a room from a stranger can be convenient, it has
the potential to be dangerous, said Webb. Users do not always know
whether the service provider has the necessary qualifications to
provide the service, what to do if problems arise, or how their
personal information will be used or how prices are set.

Webb stressed the need for governments, standards organizations and
consumer organizations to collaborate on regulating this emerging
prosumer (the blurring of consumer/producer) marketplace. “Right now
is the moment for us to engage,” said Webb. “In fact it’s a little bit
too late, but right now is a heck of a lot better than tomorrow.”

Those wishing to help solve issues of emerging technologies can get
involved in standards committees on topics ranging from nanoparticles
to smart grids. Those specifically interested in consumer issues can
apply to join SCC’s CPIP.

To learn more about standards development, see SCC’s orientation
module or subscribe to monthly news updates located on the left-hand
sidebar.

For the latest SCC news, subscribe to the SCC Monthly Newsletter or
follow us on Twitter(link is external), Facebook(link is external), or
LinkedIn(link is external).

For additional information or media inquiries contact info@scc.ca.

 

June 13, 2015:  Social Impact Investing: The Business Case for Social Impact Education-Huffington Post

Dr. Kernaghan Webb, Law and Business Professor at Ryerson University's Ted
Rogers School of Management and Director of Ryerson University's Institute
for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, comments on the societal
expectation today that corporations meet and exceed their legal and
regulatory obligations.

 

May 2, 2015:  Joe Fresh lawsuit a "legal juggernaut" if it goes to trial -- Financial Post

Ryerson CSR Institute Director Kernaghan Webb comments on the legal challenges associated with bringing a legal action in Canada against Joe Fresh and related companies concerning the collapse of the Rana Plaza complex in Bangladesh, in which 1,100 apparel workers died.

 

April 29, 2015:  Tibet mine probe bans Vancouver-based firm from export help Embassy -- Canada's Foreign Policy Newspaper

Professor Kernaghan Webb comments on the recent federal response to a complaint concerning alleged wrongdoing of China Gold International Resources Corp. Ltd's operations in Tibet's Gyama Valley.

 

November 11, 2014: Successful CSR Case Competition held at Ted Rogers School of Management

On Saturday, November 8, 2014, two Ryerson University student organizations -- the Corporate Social Responsibility Student Association (CSRSA) and the Ryerson Commerce and Government Association (RCGA) -- held their inaugural CSR Case Competition for undergraduate students at the Ted Rogers School of Management. After three rounds of competition, involving scenarios featuring CSR issues in the financial sector, the extractive sector and the food/apparel sector, the winners were:

1st place: Oluwatobi Taiwo (4th year student, Major: Law and Business, Minor: Accounting)

2nd place: Shon Wilk (3rd year student, Major: Law and Business, Minor: Finance & Global Management)

3rd place: Ryan Young (2nd year student, Chang School Student, Major: Undeclared)

Congratulations to the winners, and to all the contestants.

A special thanks to the judges who took time out of their busy schedules to adjudicate the student presentations, and did a superb job.  In alphabetical order:  Oren Berkovitch (Deloitte); Trevor David (Sustainalytics); Andrei Iovu (PhD Candidate, Ryerson University); Zaker Khan (Master's student, Ryerson University); Ron Nielsen (International Centre for Business and Sustainability); Sarah Varino (Golder and Associates), and Kernaghan Webb (Associate Professor, Department of Law and Business, Ryerson University).

Kudos to the CSRSA and RCGA, and their network of volunteers, for organizing an extremely well run competition.     


September 8, 2014: The growing field of Corporate Social Responsibility Toronto Star

Professor Webb and Ryerson instructor Bernarda Elizalde comment on innovative mining/CSR education at Ryerson University.
 

March 5, 2014: PDAC 2014: Miners keen to buy local in bid to dampen hostility to new projects  Financial Post

Ryerson CSR Institute Director Kernaghan Webb comments on CSR and the role of local procurement in mining projects.


February 26, 2014: Ryerson CSR Institute Director comments on the federal government’s Extractive Sector CSR Strategy  CBC News

Ryerson CSR Institute Director Kernaghan Webb discusses the importance of respecting national sovereignty, and the role of the CSR Centre for Excellence, in the Canadian Extractive Sector CSR Strategy.


February 14, 2014: Ryerson CSR Institute Director comments on certified chocolate  CBC News

Ryerson CSR Institute Director Kernaghan Webb gives his views on market power and certification in a CBC report on efforts to commit Canadian chocolate companies to ethically-sourced cocoa.


January 22, 2014: Report on social responsibility among Canadian mining companies
Toronto Star

The Toronto Star story was triggered by an event held by the Ryerson CSR Institute, on January 20th, where mining consultant Craig Ford spoke on the factors affecting corporate responsibility in the mining sector.


May 13, 2013: Ryerson CSR Institute provides commentary on Bangladesh apparel factory collapse

The Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility provided television, radio, and newspaper commentary on the recent Bangladesh factory collapse and the potential and actual role of the Canadian apparel industry in addressing and preventing such tragedies.  See articles in the following publications:


October 5, 2012 -- Paper on ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard now available for download

Webb, Kernaghan, ISO 26000: Bridging the Public/Private Divide in Transnational Business Governance Interactions (September 10, 2012). Osgoode CLPE Research Paper No. 21/2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2144420


August 30, 2012 -- Ryerson CSR Institute Director Wins Prestigious National Award for Social Responsibility Work

Dr. Kernaghan Webb, the Founding Director of the Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility, and Associate Professor of Law and Business at the Ted Rogers School of Management, has been awarded the Standards Council of Canada’s Award of Excellence for 2012.

On the Standards Council of Canada website, the following description of Dr. Webb’s activities is provided:

Following his first experience in standards development, as a member of the Canadian Standards Association’s (CSA’s) Technical Committee on Privacy in 1995, Dr. Kernaghan Webb has gone on to spearhead the development of numerous ground-breaking social policy standards at both the national and international levels. As senior legal policy advisor and chief of research for the Office of Consumer Affairs (Industry Canada), he quickly established himself as an international leader in the development of a number of international standards. These standards include International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 10001, 10002, 10003 and 10008 (all focused on customer satisfaction) and ISO 26000 (social responsibility). In 2007, Dr. Webb was appointed Special Advisor to the United Nations Global Compact regarding ISO 26000. He has been influential in helping ISO and other standards bodies consider how to become more inclusive, accountable and transparent in developing standards. As associate professor of law and business at Ryerson University, he has written and lectured extensively on the role and value of voluntary codes and standards as supplements to the legal system, and is a recognized international expert and sought-after speaker on this topic. A passionate advocate for consumer and public interests, Dr. Webb has worked tirelessly to promote voluntary standards that benefit society and that make the global marketplace more fair, sustainable and socially responsible.

Dr. Webb is only the second academic to win this award in its history. On learning that he was a recipient of the award, Dr. Webb was reported as saying “it’s a great honour to receive this award…the nexus between law, public policy and standards is receiving increasing attention, as governments, the private sector and civil society attempt to identify and develop fair, effective, efficient and sustainable approaches to addressing the global environmental, social and economic challenges facing the world today.”

Dr. Webb will be receiving his award at a special awards ceremony in Ottawa in October of this year.

Background Information:

ISO 10001 – international standard pertaining to codes of conduct, information concerning this standard accessible  at: http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail?csnumber=38450

ISO 10002-  international standard pertaining to complaints handling, information concerning this standard accessible  at: http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=35539

ISO 10003 – international standard pertaining to external dispute resolution, information concerning this standard accessible  at: http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail?csnumber=38449

ISO 10008 – international standard pertaining to business to consumer electronic commerce (in development)

ISO 26000 – international standard pertaining to social responsibility, information concerning this standard accessible  at: http://www.iso.org/iso/home/standards/iso26000.htm


Some relevant publications on the connections between public policy, law and standards:

Webb, Kernaghan, ISO 26000: Bridging the Public/Private Divide in Transnational Business Governance Interactions (September 10, 2012). Osgoode CLPE Research Paper No. 21/2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2144420

CD Howe Institute, The New Multilateralism: The Shift to Private Global Regulation (2012), accessible at: http://www.cdhowe.org/pdf/Commentary_360.pdf

Webb, K. (2012, forthcoming). “Antecedents of Settlement on a New Institutional Practice: Negotiations of the ISO 26000 Standard on Social Responsibility” (co-author), accepted for publication in the Academy of Management Journal. Forthcoming, 2012.

Webb, K. (2012, forthcoming). “Political Risk Insurance Contracts, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Mining Sector: Examining the Connections,” accepted for publication in International Law and Management Journal, forthcoming, 2012.

 Webb, K. (2012). “Multi-level CR and the Mining Sector: the Canadian Experience in Latin America," accepted for publication in Business and Politics Journal, forthcoming, 2012.

Webb, K. (2011). “Corporate Citizenship and Private Regulatory Regimes: Understanding New Governance Roles and Functions,” in P. Koslowski and I. Pies, eds., Corporate Citizenship and New Governance: The Political Role of Corporate Actors in Rule-Setting (Berlin: Springer Publications).

Webb, K., “Understanding the Voluntary Codes Phenomenon,” in K. Webb (ed.), Voluntary Codes: Private Governance, the Public Interest and Innovation (Ottawa: Carleton University Research Unit for Innovation, Science and Technology, 2004), accessible at: http://www5.carleton.ca/sppa/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/ch1.pdf

Webb, K. and A. Morrison, “The Law and Voluntary codes: Examining the ‘Tangled Web,” in K. Webb (ed.), Voluntary Codes: Private Governance, the Public Interest and Innovation (Ottawa: Carleton University Research Unit for Innovation, Science and Technology, 2004), accessible at: http://www5.carleton.ca/sppa/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/ch5.pdf

Rhone, G.,  J. Stroud and K. Webb, “Gap Inc.’s Code of Conduct for Treatment of Overseas Workers,” in K. Webb (ed.), Voluntary Codes: Private Governance, the Public Interest and Innovation (Ottawa: Carleton University Research Unit for Innovation, Science and Technology, 2004), accessible at: http://www5.carleton.ca/sppa/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/ch7.pdf

Rhone, G.,  D. Clarke and K. Webb, “Two Voluntary Approaches to Sustainable Forestry Practices,” in K. Webb (ed.), Voluntary Codes: Private Governance, the Public Interest and Innovation (Ottawa: Carleton University Research Unit for Innovation, Science and Technology, 2004), accessible at: http://www5.carleton.ca/sppa/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/ch9.pdf

Morrison, A., and K. Webb, “Bicycle Helmet Standards and Hockey Helmet Regulations: Two Approaches to Safety Protection,” in K. Webb (ed.), Voluntary Codes: Private Governance, the Public Interest and Innovation (Ottawa: Carleton University Research Unit for Innovation, Science and Technology, 2004), accessible at: http://www5.carleton.ca/sppa/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/ch11.pdf

Webb, K., and D. Clarke, “Voluntary Codes in the United States, the European Union and Developing Countries: A Preliminary Survey,” in K. Webb (ed.), Voluntary Codes: Private Governance, the Public Interest and Innovation (Ottawa: Carleton University Research Unit for Innovation, Science and Technology, 2004), accessible at: http://www5.carleton.ca/sppa/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/ch13.pdf

Webb, K., “Voluntary Codes: Where To From Here?” in K. Webb (ed.), Voluntary Codes: Private Governance, the Public Interest and Innovation (Ottawa: Carleton University Research Unit for Innovation, Science and Technology, 2004), accessible at: http://www5.carleton.ca/sppa/ccms/wp-content/ccms-files/ch14.pdf

 

“Lessons Learned” from the federal Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor

The Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR has a Learning Partnership with the federal CSR Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor, which among other things has resulted in a highly successful public seminar series here at the Ryerson Institute for the Study of CSR. In the January 18, 2012 issue of Embassy Magazine the Extractive Sector CSR Counsellor spoke about “lessons learned.” A pdf copy of the op-ed is available here

 

About Us

Ryerson Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility

The Institute for the Study of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is located in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University. The Institute seeks to advance CSR research, recognizing that increasingly, CSR issues are drivers for change in the business community. The goal of the Institute is to promote the Institute and Ryerson University as a centre of excellence in research and peer-reviewed publications on CSR issues, to increase research and understanding on these issues and thereby also increase research productivity in the Ted Rogers School of Management at Ryerson University, and to develop practical solutions. For further information, go to: www.ryerson.ca/csrinstitute

The Office of the Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility Counsellor

The Office of the Extractive Sector Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Counsellor was established in 2009 as part of the Government of Canada’s CSR Strategy for the International Extractive Sector.  Broadly speaking, the Strategy is designed to help Canadian mining, oil and gas companies meet their social and environmental responsibilities when operating abroad. The Office of the CSR Counsellor has a mandate to review CSR practices of Canadian companies operating outside of Canada and advise stakeholders on recognized best practices and endorsed performance standards.   For further information, please visit the Office’s website at http://www.international.gc.ca/csr_counsellor-conseiller_rse/

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Ryerson CSR Institute Events


2017

October 27: Law’s Sponsorship of Corporate Irresponsibility

October 11: Ryerson University CSR Institute Talk: Canada's Experience with the OECD Multinational Enterprise Guidelines and National Contact Point

October 4: Corporate Sustainability Reporting: An Evolving Story

September 29: Human Rights Defenders (HRDs): Multistakeholder Statement of Support for HRDs – Invitation to Participate

August 18:  CSR in the Caribbean Commonwealth: a Multi-Level Analysis

July 7:  Mining Conflicts & the Catholic Church: Exploring the Connections

May 19: Revenue Transparency, Corruption and the Extractive Sector: Panel Discussion

April 28: Good Faith, Honesty and the Bhasin v. Hrynew Decision: Where to From Here?

March 8: State & Non-state Regulatory Innovations: Learning from Conflict
Minerals

March 7: The Resource Curse & What Firms Can Do About It

2016

December 13: The Rise in Mining Conflict: What Lies Beneath?

November 21: Whistleblowing Systems: A New Canadian Guide

November 14:  Sustainable Procurement -- Two New Initiatives

June 28:  Social Licence to Operate: Revisiting the Concept

June 9:  ISO 26000 Social Responsibility Standard:  Where to from here?

May 6: The 'Legalization' of Corporate Social Responsibility: The Hong Kong ESG (Envtal, Social, Governance) Reporting Experience

April 15: Latin American Mining-Community Agreements: Case Study

March 18: Legislating CSR? Learning from India

2015

Dec 11: Indigenous Consent in the Canadian Mining Context: Learning from the Voisey's Bay Institute

Nov 12: Retail Pharmacies as Social Enterprise Health Care Providers: Lessons from USA?

Oct 26: CSR Institute Talk: Canadian Universal Investors: A Force for Socially Responsible Investing?

Oct 8: CSR Institute Talk: What does Drake have to do with CSR?

Sep 30: Forestry sustainability and APP take centre stage at Ryerson CSR Institute

Sept 18: CSR Institute Panel Discussion: From CSR Pariah to Good Performer? The Asia Pulp & Paper Turnaround Story

June 7 - 11: International Symposium on Corporate Responsibility and Sustainable
Development

March 2: Panel discussion on the Canadian Boreal Forest Agreement

Jan 29: CSR, Corp Lobbying & Transparency: Panel Discussion, moderated by Jeff Gray  

Jan 19: Unpacking the Peru-BHP Billiton Tintaya Dialogue Table, with Paul Warner

2014

Nov 20: CSR in the Mining Boardroom: A Panel Discussion with CEOs/Board Members

Nov 14: Understanding Community Investment:  A Panel Discussion with Five Private Sector Leaders

Oct 22: Mining & CSR in Africa: from Pressure to Impacts, with Tomas Frederiksen

Oct 20: Managing Community and Environmental Impacts During the Mining Construction Phase, with John Kielty

Oct 9: Procurement as a Means for Mining Firms to Secure their Social License to Operate, with Jeff Geipel and Kevin D'Souza

Sept 22: Aboriginals, Recent Supreme Court Decisions & Sustainable Economic Development, with Bernd Christmas

Sept 8: Corporate Diplomacy: Building the External Stakeholder-Reputation Relationship, with Witold Henisz

June 27: workshop on new development NGO-business platform

May 27: "Latin America, CSR & Standards: A Chilean Perspective" with Dante Pesce

May 8: Where to from Here: A Canadian Strategy for the UN Principles on Business and Human Rights? Visit the conference web page for details.

April 30: Corrupt and autocratic countries: to engage or to withdraw and isolate? A corporate view, with Sir Mark Moody-Stuart

April 14: The Governance Gap: Extractive Industries, Human Rights and the Home State Advantage

April 7: Resource Revenue Transparency:  The Emerging Canadian Approach

April 4: Measuring mining impacts on communities: Learning from Colombia's Cerrejon Coal Mine

March 24: rePlan’s Mining-Indigenous experiences in Canada, Africa and Central America

March 17: UNICEF Canada, CSR, & the Canadian Extractive Industry

March 3: "Senate Reform 2014:  What can we Learn from the Constitutional Repatriation Activity of 1982?"

Feb 13: "Addressing Homelessness:  Exploring Government, Private Sector and Civil Society Roles"

Jan 20: "Confessions of a Corporate Responsibility mining executive:  What Contributes to CR Success in the Mining Sector?"

Jan 16-17: Conference: Business, Human Rights and Law in Transnational Context

Jan 10: "Ontario’s new Mining Act regime: the Ontario-Aboriginal Interface"