Vision, Passion, Action

Now Available!

Re-Presenting Disability: Activism and Agency in the Museum, edited by Richard Sandell, Jocelyn Dodd and Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, is now available from Routledge.  Included in the collection is a detailed chronicle entitled Out From Under: A Brief History of Everything, by co-curators Kathryn Church, Melanie Panitch, and Catherine Frazee along with contributor Phaedra Livingstone. 


Newly Published

Learning through Community: Exploring Participatory Practices, a collection of case studies edited by Kathryn Church, Nina Bascia and Eric Shragge, was recently published by Springer.  The collection explores the learning that people do through community engagement. 

Remember, Ryerson students and faculty have unlimited online access to the full collection of Springer e-books through their Ryerson Library accounts!

Publications

 

This area of our website is currently under development.  Until a more complete collection is assembled, we offer the following sampling of research-related publications and presentations.

 


Cover image from Learning through Community: Exploring Participatory Practices, edited by Kathryn Church, Nina Bascia and Eric Shragge.Published Books, Chapters and Articles


Church, K., Bascia, N., & Shragge , E. (Eds.) (2008). Learning through Community: Exploring Participatory Practices. Amsterdam: Springer.

Panitch, M. 2008. Disability, Mothers and Organization: Accidental Activists. New York
and London: Routledge.

Church, K. 2008. Exhibiting as inquiry: Travels of an accidental curator. In A. Cole & J.
G. Knowles (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Social Science Research: Perspectives, Methodologies, Examples and Issues. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, 421-434.

Ignagni, E. & Church, K. 2008. One more reason to look away? Ties and tensions
between arts-informed inquiry and Disability Studies. In Cole, A., & Knowles, J.G. (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Social Science Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage, pp. 625-638.

Church, K. (forthcoming). Doing Disability at the Bank: Discoveries about the Learning/Teaching done by Disabled Bank Employees. In Livingstone, DW., Mirchandani, K., & Sawchuk, P. (Eds.) The Future of Lifelong Learning. Sense Publishers.

Church, K., Shragge, E., Ng, R., & Fontan, J.M. (2008). While no one is watching: Learning in social action among people who are excluded from the labour market. In Church, K., Bascia, N. & Shragge, E. (Eds.) Participatory Practices for Learning through Community. Amsterdam: Springer.

Ignagni, E. 2009. Free Our People. Journal of Developmental Disabilities, 15, 1: 67-70.

Reville, D. (1988)  Don’t Spyhole Me.  In Burstow, B. and Weitz, D. (eds.)
Shrink Resistant:  the Struggle Against Psychiatry in Canada.  Vancouver:  New Star Books.

Panitch, M. 2004. Mothers of Intention: Women, disability and activism.” In Stienstra, D.
and Wight-Felske, A. (Eds.) Making Equality: History of Advocacy and Persons with Disabilities in Canada. Captus Press, 262-278.

Reville, D. (2008) “Reflections on the consumer/survivor/ex-patient”. 25th Anniversary Report: Honouring the Past, Shaping the Future:  25 Years of Progress in Mental Health Advocacy and Rights Protection.  Psychiatric Patient Advocate Office.  Ontario.

Reville, D.  (2005) “Mental Health Reform:  Still Saying the Same Thing After All These Years.”  Canadian Public Policy, Vol. XXXI Supplement. 2005.

Church, K. with Frazee, C., Luciani, T., Panitch, M. and Seeley, P. (2006) Dressing corporate subjectivities: Learning what to wear to The Bank. In Billett, S., Somerville, M., and Fenwick, T. (Eds.) Work, Subjectivity and Learning. Amsterdam: Springer, 69-85.


Monographs and Occasional Papers


Mental Health Recovery Study Research Group. 2009. Mental Health “Recovery:” Users and Refusers. Toronto: Wellesley Institute.

Panitch, M. Church, K. & Frazee, C. 2008. Out from Under: Disability, History and Things to Remember -- Exhibit Catalogue. Toronto: Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research and Education.

Voronka, J., Frazee, C., Panitch, J., & Church, K. 2007. Shall we chronicle? Storying ‘Art with Attitude.’ Toronto: Toronto: Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research and Education.

Church, K. February 2007. Doing Disability at the Bank: Discovering the Informal Learning/Teaching done by Disabled Bank Employees. Final Report in unabridged and abridged versions prepared for discussion with RBC Financial.

Church, K. & Bowman, V. 2006. Disability, Work and Learning: Annotated Bibliography of Key Resources. Institute for Disability Studies Research and Education, Ryerson University, Toronto.

Church, K. & Luciani, T. 2005. ‘Stepping to the Rhythm of Circumstance:’ A Choreography of Corporate Disability: Reprise. Prepared for the National Research Network on Work and Lifelong Learning (WALL), Toronto.

Church, K. & Luciani, T. 2004. Dancing lessons: A choreography of disability in corporate culture. Paper prepared for the National Research Network on Work and Lifelong Learning (WALL), Toronto.

Church, K., Diamond, T. & Voronka, J. 2004. In Profile: Personal Support Workers in Canada. Occasional Paper #2 from the Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research and Education, Ryerson University.

Abbas, J., Church, K., Frazee, C., & Panitch, M. 2004.  Lights…Camera…Attitude! Introducing Disability Arts and Culture.  Occasional Paper #1 from the Ryerson-RBC Institute for Disability Studies Research and Education, Ryerson University.

Church, K.  Learning to walk between worlds: Informal learning in psychiatric survivor businesses: A retrospective reading of research process and outcomes: 1993-1999.  A monograph prepared for the Network for New Approaches to Lifelong Learning (NALL). 

Church, K., Shragge, E. Fontan, J.M. & Ng, R. 2001b. While no one is watching: “Social learning” among people who are excluded from the labour market. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Researching Work and Learning, Calgary, AB: University of Calgary, 241-249.

Church, K., Fontan, J-M., Ng, R. & Shragge, E. 2000.  Social learning among people who are excluded from the labour market: Context and Case Studies.  A monograph prepared for the Network for New Approaches to Lifelong Learning. 

 


Archival and Unpublished Manuscripts

User Involvement in Mental Health Services in Canada: A Work in Progress
by Kathryn Church and David Reville, September 1988
This paper was developed in 1988 for distribution to "Common Concerns", an international conference on user involvement in mental health services, held at the University of Sussex, England.  It is archived here to facilitate broader public availability.                                                      

Using the Economy to Develop the Community: Psychiatric Survivors in Ontario
Kathryn Church, April 1997
This paper, written for the Caledon Institute of Social Policy in 1997 presented a review of 10 years of effort by psychiatric survivors towards economic development in Ontario. The article uses examples to illustrate the principles guiding survivor-controlled community businesses and how these businesses do much more than create jobs. Collective employment through the creation of community businesses is presented as a means of developing and promoting social well-being.

Because of Where We've Been: The business behind the business of psychiatric survivor economic development
A few years back, a group called the Toronto Community Economic Development (CED) Network did a two-year qualitative study regarding the effects of CED on the lives of people who face serious barriers to employment. In the best tradition of local development, it created some interesting "products" for use by the communities which took part. These included a 45-minute video called "Voices of Experience" accompanied by a colourful 90-page ringbound booklet. Both featured "tales" of five CED initiatives among people on low incomes in Toronto's downtown core; two of the five were run by psychiatric survivors. The response to "Voices of Experience" was tremendous from a variety of groups: study participants; workers in frontline health, social service and anti-poverty agencies; academics in universities. Copies of this video have since been sold to interested viewers from Vancouver to Cape Breton, across the United States and overseas in England, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and Israel. Psychiatric survivor communities were especially keen. Read more of "Because of Where We've Been"

Yes We Can! The Consumer/Survivor Business Council of Ontario is an organization comprised of small businesses run by people who have been diagnosed and labeled as "mentally ill." Many have a long history with the mental health system. They often refer to themselves as "consumers" of services or as "survivors" of the system or as both: "consumers/survivors." Forty years ago, they would have lived out their lives in the custodial atmosphere of large mental institutions. However, the economic changes of the past few decades have been accompanied by a significant shift in social policy away from institutions toward community living. In the 1960's and 70's, the government of Ontario closed over half of its psychiatric hospital beds-a trend which continues to this day. Many psychiatric patients were discharged during this time, a process which was facilitated by the development and extensive use of psychotropic drugs. Today, most psychiatric survivors live most of their lives not in hospitals but in communities across the province. Read more of "Yes We Can!"