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Research Projects

Recently published monographs, original works of fiction, edited collections, and academic journals.

Research Projects

Poetry, Pictures & Popular Publishing

In Poetry, Pictures, and Popular Publishing eminent Rossetti scholar Lorraine Janzen Kooistra demonstrates the cultural centrality of a neglected artifact: the Victorian illustrated gift book. 

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Children's Literature Archive

The Children's Literature Archive at Ryerson University came to be thanks to an initial donation of several hundred books in the summer of 2009. It now contains over 1500 texts for children written primarily between the late nineteenth century and the mid-twentieth century, the cataloguing of which has recently been completed.

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Crusoe's Children: Robinson Crusoe, Children's Literature and Pop Culture

Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe (1719) is a narrative that has, as several critics have remarked, attained the status of myth. Since the book’s initial publication, both the story and the figure of Robinson Crusoe have been reproduced in an enormous number of texts and commercial goods directed primarily at the children’s and popular markets: chapbooks, print robinsonades (narratives in imitation of the original), pantomimes, popular songs, dishware, board games, video games, films both animated and live action, and many more.

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Female Mourning and Feminist Activism

A growing body of commemorative work around women’s losses and violent deaths aims not to console but to agitate — through protests, marches, vigils, monuments, and other political activism initiatives. This SSHRC-funded project seeks a historical and theoretical context for the current debates about the relationship between public remembrance and social change.

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Iranian Women's Autobiographies: Subjectivity, Trauma, Witness

This study examines the 1979 Iranian revolution as a national rupture with productive possibilities for women’s self-expression. 

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A Life in the Public Square: The Biography of Richard John Neuhaus

Richard John Neuhaus was one of the most influential figures in American public life from the Civil Rights era to the War on Terror. His writing, activism, and connections to people of power in religion, politics, and culture secured a place for himself and his ideas at the centre of recent American history. William F. Buckley, Jr. and John Kenneth Galbraith are comparable — prodigious writers and willing controversialists adept at cultivating or castigating the powerful while advancing lively arguments for the virtues and vices of the ongoing American experiment.

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Modernist Mothers

Since the 1980s, scholars like Shari Benstock and Bonnie Kime Scott have been retracing literary history and showcasing the contributions of women to modernism. What emerges from this feminist revisionism is a modernism inflected with maternal practices, metaphors, identities, and transgressions.

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Parchment: Contemporary Canadian Jewish Writing

Since 1992, Parchment has been the only literary journal devoted to contemporary Canadian Jewish writing. Our aim is provide a platform for writers to confront and celebrate Judaism and Yiddishkeit through prose, poetry, drama, and creative non-fiction. 

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Romanticism and the Museum: Antiquity, Memory, Modernity

Museums figure prominently in the Romantic period, situated as it is between and alongside the establishment of several major western European museums: the British Museum in 1753, the Louvre in 1793, and the National Gallery in 1824.

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