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Ethics@Ryerson: Speaker Series

Ethics at Ryerson Speaker Series 2011

Public Conversations about Practical Ethics

Water Ethics

During the 2011/2012 academic year, Ryerson University is reprising its popular Ethics at Ryerson Speaker Series of topical lunch-hour lectures open to the general public. This year's Series - the theme is "Water Ethics" -- is presented by the Philosophy Department of the Faculty of Arts and is generously sponsored by the Royal Bank of Canada.

The lectures are free, are open to the general public and lunch is provided to those in attendance. The event lasts for approximately an hour, with each speaker allotted 20 minutes to present, and then a Q & A session follows. The lectures will held on the Ryerson University campus in downtown Toronto.

The Series will feature speakers from within the Ryerson academic community and external experts on a variety of topics related to this important theme.  Each session will feature two speakers, with the exception of Session 3 which will be presented as a facilitated panel discussion with several speakers.

  

OVERVIEW of SESSIONS

1.  Worth Every Penny?  Debates over Market Pricing and Water Conservation

There are heated debates over public vs. private approaches to water supply and continuing discussions over whether water should be valued and traded internationally as a commodity or whether it is a public resource to which access is a human right. Strong arguments can be made for both perspectives, and the session provided an opportunity for two speakers with opposing viewpoints (economist Marcel Boyer, and founder of Lake Ontario Waterkeeper Mark Mattson) to explore this critical and timely issue.

Monday, September 26, 2011 12:00-1:15 pm
The Arts & Letters Club, 14 Elm St., Toronto
rsvp Jill Witherspoon, 416-979-5000 x4796, jwithers@ryerson.ca
[ View / Print Poster | Watch the Webcast ]

2.  Lessons from Walkerton, A Decade Later

Sadly the name "Walkerton" raises the spectre of a water-borne tragedy that could have been avoided.  Now that a decade has passed since a contaminated municipal water supply caused death and disease in this small Ontario community, what have we learned?  A water policy expert (professor Rob de Loe) and member of Concerned Citizens Walkerton (Bruce Davidson) examined lessons learned from Walkerton in terms of water management, public policy, accountability and public trust.

Monday, November 7, 2011 12:00-1:15 pm
The Arts & Letters Club, 14 Elm St., Toronto
rsvp Jill Witherspoon, 416-979-5000 x4796, jwithers@ryerson.ca
[ View / Print Poster | Watch the Webcast ]

3.  Thirst Nations: Water Crisis in Indigenous Communities

Far too many First Nations communities suffer from inadequate drinking water supply and sub-standard water quality.  This situation has reached the crisis stage for many communities and raises immediate need for solutions.  Problems with water access and safety also reflect larger issues that Indigenous communities face such as privatization, Indigenous resource rights and political autonomy, and long-standing problems with the federal funding support for Indigenous peoples. Two experts (professor Deborah McGregor and Merrill Ann Phare, legal counsel from the Centre for Indigeneous Resources) discussed crucial value dimensions of water for First Nations communities. 

Thursday February 2, 2012 12:00-1:15 pm
The Arts & Letters Club, 14 Elm St., Toronto
rsvp Jill Witherspoon, 416-979-5000, x4796, jwithers@ryerson.ca
[ View / Print Poster | Watch the Webcast ]

4. Bottle Politics: The Bottled Water Controversy

Does bottled water represent an unnecessary and wasteful environmental hazard or is it a healthy consumable product that consumers have the right to choose and purchase? A panel discussion with a business professor (Chris Gibbs) and the CUPE National Environment committee co-chair (Robert Coelho), facilitated by RBC's Sandra Odendahl, will present different sides on the issues.

Monday March 26, 2012 12:00-1:15 pm
The Arts & Letters Club, 14 Elm St., Toronto
rsvp Jill Witherspoon, 416-979-5000 x4796, jwithers@ryerson.ca
[ View / Print Poster | Watch the Webcast ]

5. Waterfronts and the Ecology of Place

Over the past 200 years, Toronto’s waterfront areas have changed drastically, due to stresses and pressures of growth and development. Many of Toronto’s environmentally minded citizens call for a revisioning and revitalization of the waterfront, to provide greater opportunities for a wealth of experiences reflecting the diversity of Toronto’s past, present and future. Planning professor Nina-Marie Lister and philosophy professor Ingrid Leman Stefanovic will provide their insights and perspectives on environmental stewardship and the ecology of place in the context of Toronto’s hopes and dreams for the waterfront.

Monday April 2, 2012  12:00-1:15 pm
The Arts & Letters Club, 14 Elm St., Toronto
rsvp Jill Witherspoon, 416-979-5000 x4796, jwithers@ryerson.ca
[ View / Print Poster | Watch the Webcast ]

  


The Venue:

 

14 Elm StreetThe Arts and Letters Club was formed in 1908 to provide a milieu for the free and vigorous exchange of ideas and opinions. 14 Elm Street is an historic building erected in 1891 by the St. George's Society. It is two blocks from the Yonge and Dundas subway stop, halfway between Bay Street and Yonge Street.

The Great Hall is a splendid room with a cathedral ceiling and a large fireplace. Its principal function is as a dining room, where guests eat at oak refectory tables designed to promote conversation. It is at these tables, day in and day out, that members of the artistic, literary, professional, and business communities meet to share opinions and perspectives, and to demonstrate that the art of good conversation is alive and flourishing.

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