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Achievements - Students and Alumni

Graduation

(twice annually)
  • For pictures, articles and webcasts of Convocation click here and here.
  • 13 June 2008 saw the first graduate of the Politics and Governance program.

 

Amethyst Awards

Winners of the Government of Ontario Amethyst Award for Outstanding Achievement

presented in June 2016:

  • Justin Zelasko (MA, 2011)
    Katherine Hewson Outstanding New Professional Award
  • Pamela Jewell (MA, 2013)
    Team: Pan Am / Parapan Am Games Integrated Exercise Program
  • Kristina Sannuto (MA, 2011)
    Team: Regional Express Rail Investment

presented in May 2011:

  • Fausto Iannialice (MA, 2008)
  • Agapi A. Mavridis (MA, 2008)
  • Reg Pearson (Lecturer, MA program)

 

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Achievements - Faculty

2016

Pamela Palmater recipient of the J.S. Woodsworth
Woman of Excellence Award

Dr. Pamela Palmater, Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration and Chair in Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University, was awarded the 2016 J.S. Woodsworth Woman of Excellence Award by Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath at a ceremony held 29 May 2016.

Click here for photos and further information.

2016

Pamela Palmater honoured by the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario (ETFO)

Recognizing her as "Mi'kmaq, Eel River Bar First Nation, Lawyer, Professor, Author, Public Speaker, Activist, Holds 4 University Degrees, Spokesperson/Educator - Idle No More," the Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario named Dr. Pamela Palmater as one of 21 inspirational First Nations, Métis, and Inuit women in Canada. 

To honour these 21 women, the ETFO has produced a poster which will be distributed to all schools in Ontario.

2016

Pamela Palmater joined the Advisory Council of the
MacEachen Institute for Public Policy and Governance

On 09 May 2016, Dr Pamela Palmater, Chair in Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and Associate Professor in the Department of Politics and Public Administration joined the External Advisory Council of the newly-formed MacEachen Institute for Public Policy and Governance at Dalhousie University.

Click here for photo and further details.

 

2016

John Shields received Dean's Excellence Award
for Research Impact

Dr. John Shields was named 2016 recipient of the Dean's Excellence Award for Research Impact.  The award was presented 05 May 2016 at the Faculty of Arts Year-End celebration.  Click here for photo and further details.

2016

John Shields winner of National Metropolis Research Award

Dr. John Shields has been named, by the National Metropolis Awards Subcommittee, as the 2016 recipient of the National Metropolis Research Award, which is open to academics and/or graduate students who have made outstanding contributions to the field of immigration and settlement in Canada.  The Award is intended to establish a benchmark of achievement and excellence, bringing pride and peer acknowledgement to the deserving recipients.  The National Metropolis Awards are sponsored by VIA Rail.  Click here for photos and further details.

2016

Book Launch

On 29 January 2016, a book launch was held at Biet Zatoun to launch Dr. Pamela Palmater's latest book:Indigenous Nationhood: Empowering Grassroots Citizens (with a foreword by Niigaanwewidam James Sinclair) from Fernwood Publishing.  An enthusiastic audience of approximately 160 was on hand to celebrate this milestone. 

Dr. Pamela Palmater gave an brief talk, in which she explained the genesis and development of the book.  She took several questions, and then signed copies. 

Click here for photographs of the event.

2015

University of New Brunswick 2015 Alumni Award of Distinction

Pamela D. Palmater (LLB 97) received the 2015 UNB Alumni Award of Distinction for her social justice work for First Nations that has been recognized nationally and internationally. The award dinner was held on March 26 in St. John, NB, and the award was presented by the President of UNB Associated Alumni, Marc Bedard.

The citation notes:

She has four university degrees, including a BA from St. Thomas in Native Studies and an LLB from UNB, where she won the Faskin Campbell Godfrey prize in natural resources and environmental law. She went on to complete her Master and Doctorates in Law from Dalhousie University Law School specializing in First Nation law. Pam began her advocacy career during her studies at UNB. She volunteered at numerous First Nation organizations and related community events.

Pam has been studying, volunteering and working in First Nation issues for over 25 years on a wide range of social and legal issues, such as  poverty, housing, child and family services, treaty rights, education and legislation impacting First Nations. She has been recognized with many awards for her social justice advocacy on behalf of Indigenous women and children and most recently for her work related to murdered and missing Indigenous women.

Click here for a photo of Pam receiving the award from the President of UNB Associated Alumni, Marc Bedard

2015

Deans' Service Award

Neil Thomlinson was honoured to receive a Deans’ Service Award in 2015.  The Award was presented at a luncheon on 29 January 2015, and is part of the University Awards ceremonies on on Thursday, 26 March 2015 at the Eaton Chelsea Hotel.  The following is adapted from the nomination submitted by Carla Cassidy and David Checkland.

Over his nearly twenty years at Ryerson Neil Thomlinson has meticulously completed a staggering number of service undertakings.

At the University level he was a member of Senate, the Senate Priorities Committee, the Academic Standards Committee, the Senate Task Force on Interdisciplinary Programs (for which he was lead author of the Report), the Provost’s Academic Plan Advisory Group, and lead author of the Report proposing amendments to Policy 45. At the Departmental and Faculty level, he was Chair of the DEC, a member of the DAC, the OPSEU Hiring Committee, the IAC, the Curriculum Committee, the SRC Committee, the Steering Committee for the Fire Services partnership, and the Interim Department Council for the PhD in Policy Studies.  He was principal author and major participant in drafting Bylaws for the Program Council for the Policy Studies PhD, and for the Department Council, and assisted with the Bylaw for the Program Council of the Public Policy and Administration MA.  He is also the Department’s Webmaster.

In his profession, Neil served on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Political Science Association (CPSA) from 2012-2015, as member of the Editorial Board of The Hinge since 2007, and a member of the Policy and Accreditation Committee of the Ontario Municipal Management Institute (OMMI) for many years.

2014

A Bold Vision

Pamela Palmater was one of the 23 Visionary Women Leaders selected to meet and answer the question “What do 23 women envision for our country for the next 150 years?” A Bold Vision (an organization formed by a coalition of women’s organizations in Prince Edward Island, with support from PEI 2014 Inc.) held a conference in Charlottetown, PEI on September 24-26, 2014 to commemorate the 1864 Charlottetown Conference that led to the formation of Canada, to celebrate the vital role women played and will continue to play in the advancement of Canada, and to update the 1864 vision of the 23 male “Fathers of Confederation.” Canadians nominated women leaders from all walks of life to participate in this discussion of the future of Canada. All of the participants contributed to a book sharing their vision for Canada, which was released during the conference:

A Bold Vision: Women Leaders Imagining Canada’s Future, ed. A Bold Vision Steering Committee (with a Foreword by Roberta Bondar). Charlottetown: Women’s Network, Inc., 2014.

2013

Jill Vickers Prize

Dr. Tracey Raney was awarded the 2013 Jill Vickers Prize for her paper entitled “Leaving Parliament: Gender and Exit in the Ontario Legislature.” The prize was announced, and the plaque presented, at the President’s Dinner of the Canadian Political Science Association Annual Conference (part of the Congress of Humanities and Social Sciences) in Victoria, BC on 05 June 2013.

Click here for photo.

The Jill Vickers Prize was established in 2004 in honour of Professor Jill Vickers, an activist and a leader in Canadian feminist scholarship, and the author of numerous books and articles in the fields of feminist political science, epistemology and interdisciplinary methodology, feminist theory and movements for change, and is awarded annually to the author or authors of the best paper presented, in English or French, at the annual conference of the Canadian Political Science Association on the topic of gender and politics.

2012

Bertha Wilson Honour Society

On 29 October 2012, Dean Kim Brooks of the Schulich School of Law (Dalhousie) came to Ryerson to induct Dr. Pamela Palmater into the Bertha Wilson Honour Society.

Click here for photographs of the event.

2011

Amethyst Awards

Government of Ontario (2011)

Winners of the Government of Ontario Amethyst Award for Outstanding Achievement, presented in May 2011:

 

Chang School

On 29 April 2011, , the G. Raymond Chang School of Continuing Education held an Appreciation Celebration to honour Chairs and Academic Coordinators who were leaving roles in which they made a valuable contribution to Continuing Education. Dr. Neil Thomlinson (Undergraduate Coordinator 2002-2006; Department Chair 2006-2011) was recognised at that event and spoke about his work with CE.

  • Click here for photographs of the event.

2010

Faculty of Arts Teaching Award

Mitu Sengupta received a Dean’s Teaching Award in 2010.  The citation, on the website of the Learning and Teaching Office, reads:

Dr. Sengupta is an exemplary teacher who has shown great innovation in the classroom and has served as a strong mentor to her students. Her ability to motivate students and enthusiasm for teaching is of the highest calibre. Her student evaluation scores have been consistently excellent across a range of courses. Students and faculty evaluators of Professor Sengupta's teaching have routinely commented on her engaging style, the attentiveness of the students, and her familiarity with the content. The overwhelming consensus is that Professor Sengupta is a gifted instructor. For a newly tenured faculty member these are remarkable achievements. In the coming years, Mitu is sure to excel as both an exemplar of Ryerson's commitment to first-rate teaching and as a role model and mentor for students.

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Achievements - Department

Briefing Notes, the hard-copy newsletter of the Department of Politics and School of Public Administration (as it then was), was produced regularly until Fall 2004. Archived copies are available here.

From Fall 2007 through Spring 2011, The PPAliticus was produced in both hard and soft copy by Dr. Patrice Dutil with the assistance of the Politics and Public Administration (PPA) Alumni. 

IPAC/Deloitte Public Sector Leadership Award

The efforts of the Department of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson to provide education in Public Administration and Governance to Ontario First Nations was recognised in 2010 by Deloitte and the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC) with a Silver Award in the Education category of the IPAC/Deloitte Public Sector Leadership Award.  The award was presented at the 05 April 2011 meeting of Ryerson’s Senate.

  • Click here for the video explaining the program that was part of the nomination.
  • Click here for photos and further information.
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Department Events

Department Seminar Series

Phyllis Clarke Memorial Lecture

The Phyllis Clarke Memorial Lecture is held annually, usually in March, to honour the memory of Phyllis Clarke, a member of the Department from 1977 until her death in 1988.

2016 PA8209 students produce From the Ashes: Government and Nonprofit Cooperation in Emergency Management, a major policy paper that explores the challenges faced by governments and the third sector when cooperating in emergency management, and makes recommendations for these challenges to be overcome.  As a course capstone, an expert panel discussed the subject at an event on 27 June 2016.  Details here.
2010

Anniversary (5th) of Public Policy and Administration (MA) program (14 October)

Dr. David E. Smith received an Honorary Doctorate from Ryerson University (18 June), having been nominated by Dr. Neil Thomlinson and Dr. James Cairns (a sessional instructor in the Department at the time of the nomination).

2008 David Crombie Dinner (05 March)
2007

Anniversary (45th) of Public Administration and Governance Program (26  October)

2005 Launch of Public Policy and Administration (MA) Program (14 October)
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External News
The following external news items are archived because of their lasting interest.

Career

Liberal-Arts Majors Have Plenty of Job Prospects,
if They Have Some Specific Skills, Too

Goldie Blumenstyk
Chronicle of Higher Education, 09 June 2016

While it is true that liberal arts grads have a difficult time landing their first job, it is also true that these grads can drastically improve their prospects by “acquiring a small level of proficiency in one of eight specific skill sets,” writes Goldie Blumenstyk for the Chronicle of Higher Education. The author cites a recent worldwide analysis of nearly a million job postings to argue that “the reality is the liberal arts are really close” to providing students with what employers are looking for. These graduates simply need a modest level of proficiency in skills such as data analysis, computer programming, or management.“ This is not hard-core stuff that’s needed,” Blumenstyk concludes, adding that new data should quickly help people “get past the lazy debate” over the value of liberal arts education.

summary from academica.ca, 10 June 2016

Canada must bolster liberal arts, social sciences to remain relevant
Academica Top Ten Friday 11 March 2016

Canada will need to bolster the study of the liberal arts and social sciences if it wishes to compete in a 21st-Century economy, according to industry and higher ed experts interviewed by iPolitics. A report released this month by the Business Council of Canada showed that, for Canadian employers, skills like teamwork, good communication, problem-solving, and collaboration are more desirable than technical expertise when hiring a new employee. Ultimately, the broad and adaptable skill set of a liberal arts or social science graduate remains valuable “regardless of what price the oil is in a given year and sudden swings in the economy,” said Universities Canada President Paul Davidson.

Thomas R. Klassen and John A. Dwyer.  How to Succeed at University (and get a Great Job!):  Mastering the Critical Skills You Need for School, Work, and Life.  Vancouver: UBC Press, 2015.

Review: Adam Mayers, "Why an arts degree still gets you a great job," Toronto Star online 07 September 2015 [print "Why getting an arts degree pays off," Toronto Star, 08 September 2015, S6.]

Leaders are more likely to hold degrees in social sciences

A June 2015 study by the British Council, “Educational Pathways of Leaders: An International Comparison,” reports that a majority of leaders hold degrees in the social sciences or the humanities. The survey results also show that younger leaders, defined as those under 45, are more likely to have social science and humanities degrees. See also Scott Jaschik, “Social Sciences Produce Leaders,” Inside Higher Ed, 02 June 2015.

Conference Board of Canada research demonstrates that critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, literacy, and collaboration (the hallmarks of Social Sciences and Humanities degrees) are in high demand by employers.

Steve Lohr, "With Finance Disgraced, Which Career Will Be King?" New York Times, 12 April 2009.
Lohr argues that careers in the public sector are increasingly attractive.
Government and Google: Top Ranked Employers amongst students. For the third time in a row, the Government of Canada has taken the number one most desirable employer ranking position amongst post-secondary students, an October 2007 research report reveals.
"Public sector prepares for baby boomer exodus," Ottawa Citizen, 6 November 2006.
"At 200Gs, Deputy Ministers outearn Premier," Toronto Sun, 11 November 2005, p. 3.

Education

The benefits of university education, especially education in the Social Sciences and Humanities.

Ontario University Graduates are Securing Well-Paying Jobs in Their Field
Council of Ontario Universities, Grad Survey, November 2016

More than nine out of ten university graduates from Ontario find well-paying jobs within two years of graduating, according to a new study conducted for the province’s Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development. The survey-based study showed that university graduates in full-time jobs earn an average salary of almost $42K six months after graduation, and an average of more than $49K after two years. The report also found that employment rates and earnings for university undergraduates were higher than they were for any other level of education. A large majority of recent graduates in full-time jobs also said that their work was related to the skills they developed in their program of study. “In a complex and ever-changing world, Ontario’s universities are helping to build a brighter future for graduates, their families and communities, and the province,” said Council of Ontario Universities President David Lindsay. [Summary from academica.ca Top Ten, 15 December 2016]

STEM Education is Vital: But Not at the Expense of the Humanities
The Editors, Scientific American, October 2016
.pdf version here

“Promoting science and technology education to the exclusion of the humanities may seem like a good idea, but it is deeply misguided,” write the editors of Scientific American. The article explores what it deems to be the “parallel dynamism” of the arts and sciences to argue that the United States should not be trying to change the liberal arts mission of its universities, particularly at a time when developing countries are working hard to emulate this model. The article cites research showing that employers most commonly seek applicants with the ability to “think critically, communicate clearly, and solve complex problems,” adding that these are the very skills that a liberal arts education provides.  [Summary from academica.ca]

The Cynics are Wrong about the Value of an Arts Degree
Alan Shepard (President, Concordia University)
Montreal Gazette, 19 September 2016
.pdf version here

“At the beginning of the school year, there’s a lot of optimism in the air — and in some quarters, cynicism about the value of a university degree,” writes Concordia University President Alan Shepard. The author argues that such cynicism is usually “just plain wrong,” highlighting the financial benefits of obtaining a university degree before adding that “graduates are also more likely to donate time and money, vote, and rate their physical and mental health higher — just a few concrete signs of the ways an education transforms people, and their families’ futures.” Shepard admits, however, that universities like all institutions must adapt to changing times to remain relevant. To this end, he lays out three ways universities can help foster thriving students in the 21st century. [Summary from academica.ca]

Liberal-Arts Majors Have Plenty of Job Prospects,
if They Have Some Specific Skills, Too

Goldie Blumenstyk
Chronicle of Higher Education, 09 June 2016

While it is true that liberal arts grads have a difficult time landing their first job, it is also true that these grads can drastically improve their prospects by “acquiring a small level of proficiency in one of eight specific skill sets,” writes Goldie Blumenstyk for the Chronicle of Higher Education. The author cites a recent worldwide analysis of nearly a million job postings to argue that “the reality is the liberal arts are really close” to providing students with what employers are looking for. These graduates simply need a modest level of proficiency in skills such as data analysis, computer programming, or management.“ This is not hard-core stuff that’s needed,” Blumenstyk concludes, adding that new data should quickly help people “get past the lazy debate” over the value of liberal arts education.

summary from academica.ca, 10 June 2016

Universities collaborate to win public support for the liberal arts
Natalie Samson
University Affairs, 30 March 2016

The article reports on a recent conference at which the value of liberal arts education was highlighted and strategies were discussed to promote this message.

Canada must bolster liberal arts, social sciences to remain relevant
Academica Top Ten Friday 11 March 2016

Canada will need to bolster the study of the liberal arts and social sciences if it wishes to compete in a 21st-Century economy, according to industry and higher ed experts interviewed by iPolitics. A report released this month by the Business Council of Canada showed that, for Canadian employers, skills like teamwork, good communication, problem-solving, and collaboration are more desirable than technical expertise when hiring a new employee. Ultimately, the broad and adaptable skill set of a liberal arts or social science graduate remains valuable “regardless of what price the oil is in a given year and sudden swings in the economy,” said Universities Canada President Paul Davidson.

During the conference of the Association of American Colleges and Universities held January 20-23, 2016, Richard Detweiler, president of the Great Lakes Colleges Association, presented research showing that people who had experiences associated with liberal arts education as undergraduates are more likely than their peers who did not have such experiences to be a leader, show interest in arts and culture, be viewed as ethical, and report fulfilment and happiness [Education Advisory Board (EAB) News, 01 February 2016].

Scott Jaschik, "The Proof Liberal Arts Colleges Need?"  Inside Higher Ed, 22 January 2016.

In an era of public scrutiny over the salaries of college graduates, a recent study found that having a six-figure salary was most strongly correlated to taking more classes beyond one's major—not to the choice of major itself. 

Alan Wildeman.  "We ignore the liberal arts at our peril." The Globe and Mail, 07 September 2015.

Thomas R. Klassen and John A. Dwyer.  How to Succeed at University (and get a Great Job!):  Mastering the Critical Skills You Need for School, Work, and Life.  Vancouver: UBC Press, 2015.

Review: Adam Mayers, "Why an arts degree still gets you a great job," Toronto Star online 07 September 2015 [print "Why getting an arts degree pays off,"Toronto Star, 08 September 2015, S6.]

Robert Campbell, "Why the liberal arts are vital to our prosperity," Universities Canada, 10 August 2015.  [Article also appeared on 08 August 2015 in the Moncton Times and Transcript and in the Telegraph Journal.]
George Anders, "That 'Useless' Liberal Arts Degree Has Become Tech's Hottest Ticket," Forbes, 29 July 2015.

Social Science degrees and Leadership positions

A majority of leaders hold degrees in the social sciences or the humanities, according to a June 2015 report “Educational Pathways of Leaders: An International Comparison,” (British Council). The survey reports results from 1,709 leaders in 30 countries, defined as people in a “position of influence within their organization.” Fully 44% of respondents had training in the social sciences, with a further 11% in the humanities. The survey results also show that younger leaders, defined as those under 45, are more likely to have social science and humanities degrees. [Adapted from academica.ca, 13 July 2015]

The Report has attracted attention in the Higher Education circles.  See Scott Jaschik, “Social Sciences Produce Leaders,” Inside Higher Ed, 02 June 2015.

Adam Chapnick, "Arts Advantage:  Why enrolling in the liberal arts is smarter than you think," Literary Review of Canada, May 2015.
Cody Gault, "Here's what it takes to be a CEO, according to somebody who gets them hired,"  Financial Post, 25 March 2015.
Ross Finnie and Allan Rock, "Graduates’ labour market outcomes remain strong across the board," University Affairs, 09 February 2015.

Conference Board of Canada research demonstrates that critical thinking, problem-solving, communication, literacy, and collaboration (the hallmarks of Social Sciences and Humanities degrees) are in high demand by employers.

Don Tapscott, "The misguided attack on arts and science degrees," Toronto Star, 15 May 2014, A21.

Statistics Canada research (27 Feb 2014) demonstrates that university graduates earn up to 75 per cent more than those with high school only.

Council of Ontario Universities (COU) study (February 2014) shows the significant labour market advantage of a university degree.
American Association of Colleges & Universities published research (22 January 2014) highlighting the success of liberal arts graduates.
Reviews
Ellen Roseman, "Pros, cons of getting a grad degree," Toronto Star, 10 December 2006, A20.
Hi-tech CEOs say value of liberal arts is increasing
In April of 2000, thirty leaders of Canadian high-technology corporations took out a large advertisement to underscore the importance of liberal arts education in the digital economy.
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