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A snap shot of Associate Professor Cyndy Baskin, the School of Social Work

Cyndy Baskin

Associate Professor

BA, BSW, MSW, PhD

Office

EPH-212, Eric Palin Hall

416 979 5000 ext. 6217

cbaskin@ryerson.ca

Cyndy Baskin is Associate Professor in the School of Social Work at Ryerson University. Of Mi’kmaq and Celtic Nations, she is of the Fish Clan and also known as The Woman Who Passes on the Teachings.

She is the Academic Coordinator of Ryerson University’s Chang School of Continuing Education Certificate in Indigenous Knowledges and Experiences in Canada, serves as the Chair of Ryerson University’s Aboriginal Education Council and is the Board President of Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto.

Cyndy’s teaching is primarily on bringing Indigenous worldviews into social work education for both Indigenou and non-Indigenous students. Thus, she develops and teaches courses which focus on this area and ensures that this content is integrated into all of the other courses she instructs. Cyndy also has a strong teaching emphasis on how social work theory, practice, research and policy interact and impact on one another. With several years’ experience as a front line social worker, she also has a practice based emphasis in her teaching.

Cyndy’s research focuses on structural determinants of health, connections between child welfare and substance misuse treatment with Indigenous women, food and water security, missing and murdered Indigenous women and youth wellness in Indigenous communities, with an emphasis on the implementation of Indigenous research methodologies.

Academic Cooridinator of Ryerson University’s Chang School of Continuing Education’s Certificate in Indigenous Knowledges and Experiences

Board Member Native Men’s Residence of Toronto

Board President of Native Women’s Resource Centre of Toronto

Canadian Association of Schools of Social Work

Canadian Association of Studies in Food Security

Canadian Association of Universities Teachers Aboriginal Caucas

Chair of Ryerson University's Aboriginal Education Council

Selected Publications

2016 Strong Helpers' Teachings: The value of Indigenous knowledges in the helping professions (2ND Edition). Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

2016 Social work with Indigenous Peoples in Canada Encyclopedia of Social Work. New York: National Association of Social Workers and Oxford University Press.

2016 Towards the wellbeing of Aboriginal mothers and their families: You can’t mandate time Indigenous mothering, family and community: International perspectives. Book edited by M. Lavell-Harvard & K. Anderson. Toronto: Demeter Press.

2015 Long time overdue: An examination of the destructive impacts of policy and legislation on pregnant and parenting Aboriginal women and their children. International Indigenous Policy Journal 6(1). Retrieved from http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/iipj/vol6/iss1/5

2015 The role of social work in the lives of Aboriginal Peoples. Introduction to social work in Canada: Histories, contexts and practices. Book edited by N. Ives, M. Denov & T. Sussman. Don Mills, ON: Oxford University Press.

 2014 Grannies, Elders and friends: Aging Aboriginal women in Toronto. Journal of Gerontological Social Work 58(1). Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01634372.2014.912997

2013 Shaking off the colonial inheritance: Indigenous youth resist, reclaim and reconnect Youth homelessness in Canada: Implications for policy and practice. Book edited by S. Gatez, B. O'Grady, K. Buccier, J. Karabanow, & A. Marsolais. Toronto: York University Canadian Homelessness Research Network.

2012 Systemic oppression, violence and healing in Aboriginal communities. Cruel but not unusual: Violence  in Canadian families: A sourcebook for educators & practitioners. (2nd Edition). Book edited by R. Alaggia & C.  Kitchener: Wilfred Laurier University Press.

2012 Aboriginal youth talk about structural determinants as the cause of their homelessness. Racism, colonialism and Indigeneity in Canada. Book edited by M.J. Cannon & L. Sunseri. Toronto: Oxford University Press.

2012 Using the Seven Sacred Teachings to improve services for Aboriginal mothers experiencing drug and alcohol misuse problems and involvement with child welfare. Well-being in the urban Aboriginal community: Fostering biimaadiziwin, a national research conference on urban Aboriginal Peoples. Book edited by D. Newhouse, K. FitzMaurice, T. McGuire-Adams & D. Jette. Toronto: Thompson Educational Publishing Inc.

2010 Challenges, connections and creativity: Anti-violence work with racialized women. Out of the Shadows: Women abuse in ethnic, immigrant and Aboriginal communities. Book edited by S. Ackerman et al. Kitchener: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.

2010 The spirit of belonging: Indigenous practices in conflict transformation. Journal of Community Corrections 19(1), 9-16.

2010 Collaborating to tell the stories of homelessness in Toronto. Creative arts in interdisciplinary practice, inquiries for hope and change. Book edited by C. McLean & R. Kelly. Calgary, AB: Detselig Enterprises Ltd.

2009 Evolution and revolution: Healing approaches with Aboriginal adults. Wicihitowin: Aboriginal social work in Canada. Book edited by R. Sinclair, M. Hart & G. Bruyere. Halifax: Fernwood Publishing.

2009 Struggles, strengths and solutions: Exploring food security with young urban Aboriginal moms. Esurio: Ontario journal of hunger and poverty 1(1). Retrieved from http://www.esurio.ca/ojs-2.2/index.php/esurio/article/view/18/37

2008 Which of the Following is NOT an Essential Service? Roads, Schools, Food Access: Exploring Food Security with Young Aboriginal Moms. Toronto Food Policy Council CUHI Seminar Series. Retrieved from http://tfpc.to/resources/acceptability/which-of-the-following-is-not-an-essential-service-roads-schools-food-access-exploring-food-security-with-young-aboriginal-moms

2008 We pass the talking stick to you: Forming alliances and identities in the academy. Canadian journal of Native education 31(1), 89 – 106.

2008 Indigenous youth exploring identities through food security in Canada and Brazil. Maori and Indigenous peoples review 3(5). Retrieved from http://ojs.review.mai.ac.nz/index.php/MR/article/view/174/179   

2008 “I can’t decide what hurts more – to shut up or speak up”: Aboriginal female learners in the academy. Whose university is it, anyway? Power and privilege on gendered terrain. Book edited by A.Wagner, S. Acker and K. Mayuzumi. Toronto: Sumach Press.

2007 Conceptualizing, framing and politicizing Aboriginal ethics in mental health. Journal of ethics in mental health 2, 2. Retrieved from http://www.jemh.ca/issues/v2n2/documents/JEMH_V2N2_Article_Part1_AboriginalEthicsMentalHealth.pdf

2007 Working together in the circle: Challenges and possibilities within mental health ethics. Journal of ethics in mental health 2(2). Retrieved from http://www.jemh.ca/issues/v2n2/documents/JEMH_V2N2_Article_Part2_AboriginalEthicsMentalHealth.pdf

2007 Aboriginal youth talk about structural determinants as the causes of their homelessness. First peoples child and family review 3(3), 31-42.

2007 Circles of resistance: Spirituality and transformative change in social work education and practice. Spirituality and social work: Selected Canadian readings. Book edited by J.Coates, J.R. Graham, B. Swartzentruber & B. Ouellette Toronto: Canadian Scholars Press.

2007 Structural determinants as the cause of homelessness for Aboriginal youth. Critical social work 8(1). Retrieved from www.criticalsocialwork.com

2006 Aboriginal world views as challenges and possibilities in social work education. Critical social work, 7(2). Retrieved from www.criticalsocialwork.com