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Kelly Train

Title:

Instructor

Education:

B.A. (York University, Political Science), M.A. (University of Toronto/OISE, Education), Ph.D. (York University, Sociology)

Office:

JOR-322

Telephone:

416-979-5000 ext 4853

Email Address:

ktrain@ryerson.ca

Department:

Sociology

Research Interests:


Race and Ethnicity; Diaspora; Immigration and Nation-Building; Jews; Whiteness; Feminism and Gender; Families in Canada

Dr. Train’s research focuses on how the concept of authenticity is used to regulate notions of belonging and membership within Jewish community construction.  In particular, she explores the experiences of Arab and Indian Jews and how they negotiate their identities within the broader Jewish community in Toronto.   In 2010, Dr. Train was awarded the Dr. Stephen Speisman – Ontario Jewish Archives Award towards the funding of this research project.  She is currently working on a number of large projects, including a book exploring the marginalization of the voices of Sephardi, Mizrahi and Jewish women of colour within Jewish feminist theory, and a book entitled, Families in Canada: Difference and Diversity, to be published with McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited.

Teaching Interests: Sociology of Families, Feminism and Gender, Race and Ethnicity, Diversity, Introductory Sociology

Dr. Train’s pedagogical approach focuses around the concept of applied sociology and how the study of society is relevant in students’ everyday lives and professional practice.  She practices inclusive learning by emphasizing a critical feminist, anti-racist perspective that interrogates common sense assumptions of race, class, gender, sex and sexuality, and highlights subjugated knowledges, histories, experiences and contributions of women, racial, ethnic and religious minorities.

Current Courses:

SOC 605     Families: Difference and Diversity

SOC 608    Women, Power and Change

SOC 502    Violence and Families

SOC 606    Work and Families in the 21st Century

SOC 300    Sociology of Diversity

SOC 103    How Society Works

Professional Affiliations:

Dr. Train is the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 3904 Steward for the Department of Sociology and the VP Campaigns for CUPE Local 3904.  She has been invited to act as a reviewer for a number of journal editorial boards, including Diaspora, Indigenous and Minority Education, Journal of Family Issues, Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Journal of Education and Training Studies, Journal of Mundane Behavior and Social Problems, and has been invited to assess book proposals for scholarly publishers such as Pearson Education and Nelson Education, as well as grant proposals for the Social Science and Humanities Research Council.  She has been an active member of the Jews and Multiculturalism research working group since its creation in 2009 as well as the recently established Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Research Centre at Ryerson University, and has been invited to speak at various community organizations on issues of diversity and difference within the Toronto Jewish community.

Selected Publications & Presentations:

Forthcoming Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Well, How Can You Be Jewish and European?  Indian Jewish Experiences in the Toronto Jewish Community and the Creation of Congregation BINA.”  American Jewish History, Special Issue on Jews of Colour.
Forthcoming Train, Kelly Amanda.  Patriarchy and the “Other” in the Western Imagination: Honour Killings and Violence Against Women.  In Amina Jamal, Mandeep Kaur Mucina & Farrah Khan (eds.).  Honour/Shame Related Violence in Canada.  Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.
Forthcoming Train, Kelly Amanda.  “East Meets West: Sephardic and Mizrahi Jews in Canada and the United States.”  In Barry Stiefel & Hernan Tesler-Mabe (eds.).  The Borderlands of Jewish Identity: The Jewish Experience between Canada and the United States.  Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
Forthcoming

Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Breadwinner Role,” “Divorce Law,” “Household Labour,” and “Judaism and Families” in Constance Shehan (ed.).  The Encyclopedia of Family Studies.  Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.

2013 Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Am I That Jew? North African Jewish Experiences in the Toronto Jewish Day School System and the Establishment of Or Haemet Sephardic School.”  Diaspora, Indigenous and Minority Education: Studies on Migration, Integration, Equity and Cultural Survival, Special Issue on Rethinking Jewish Education, 7(1):6-20.   
2012 Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Anti-Semitism,” “Canadian Minority Communities,” and “Immigration to Canada” in Carl Rollyson (ed.).  The Twenties in America.  Pasadena, CA: Salem Press Inc.
2011 Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Immigration to Canada,” and “Jews in Canada” in Tandy Lewis (ed.).  The Thirties in America.  Pasadena, CA: Salem Press Inc.
2010 Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Immigration to Canada,” “Jews in Canada,” and “Refugees in North America” in Tandy Lewis (ed.).  The Forties in America.  Pasadena, CA: Salem Press Inc.
2006 Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Carving Out a Space of One’s Own: The Sephardic Kehila Centre and the Toronto Jewish Community.” In Cheryl Teelucksingh (ed.).  Claiming Space: Racialization in Canadian Cities.  Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press.
2002 Train, Kelly Amanda.  “As Long As It’s Not in My Backyard:  September 11th and Other Apocalyptic Events,” Journal of Mundane Behavior, 3(3):337-349.
2000 Train, Kelly Amanda.  “Whiteness, White Otherness and Jewish Identity.” Journal of Mundane Behavior, 1(2):135-142.
1999 Corsianos, Marilyn and Train, Kelly Amanda (eds.).  Interrogating Social Justice: Politics, Culture and Identity. Toronto, ON: Canadian Scholars' Press, Inc.
1999 Train, Kelly Amanda.  "The Crime of Authenticity: Regulating Boundaries of Identity Around Jewish Community Through the Image of Russian Jewish Criminality." In Marilyn Corsianos and Kelly Amanda Train (eds.).  Interrogating Social Justice: Politics, Culture and Identity.  Toronto, ON: Canadian Scholars' Press, Inc., pp. 143-154.
1996 Train, Kelly Amanda.  "AIDS, Race and the Construction of Jewish Community: Ethiopian Jews in Israel," Response: A Contemporary Jewish Review. (66):51-55.