You are now in the main content area

Penalties and Consequences

Penalties

For a glimpse at the step-by-step process of how the Academic Integrity policy process works from suspicion to appeal, see the PDF fileAcademic Misconduct flowchart.

Below is a brief description of the findings, penalties and consequences. Please see PDF filePolicy 60: Academic Integrity, opens in new window for a full description of the policy, procedures and guidelines.

The decision maker (professor/DDM/etc.) will decide whether you will receive a "A finding of No Academic Misconduct" or a "Finding of academic misconduct."  The decision is based on the balance of probabilities.

If there is a finding of academic misconduct, the decision maker is required to assign an associated academic penalty.  

For undergraduate students, the minimum academic penalty for academic misconduct relating to an assessment in a course is a grade reduction on the work, up to and including a grade of “zero” (0) on the work.

For graduate students, the minimum academic penalty is a grade of "zero" (0) on the work.

A number of other penalties can be assigned and/or recommended.  Please refer to PDF filePolicy 60, Section 7 for more details and review the google docPenalty Guidelines, external link, opens in new window.

If there is no finding of academic misconduct you may still be required to participate in education around academic integrity.  Examples include the Fundamentals of Academic Integrity (FAI) Quiz and/or Student Life & Learning Support, Academic Integrity Office, and/or Ryerson Library workshop(s). You can be assigned a maximum of 3 workshops.

Failure to complete these requirements may result in you not being able to graduate.

Consequences

Possible non-penalty outcomes that can result from a suspicion of academic misconduct. Please see PDF filePolicy 60: Academic Integrity for a full description of the policy and procedures.

A Disciplinary Notation (DN) is automatically placed on the your record (not your transcript) and is removed upon graduation. The DN is used to identify patterns of academic misconduct. Please be aware that the principle of Progressive Discipline, (i.e. having two (2) or more DNs on your academic record) increases the penalties/consequences assigned with repeated violations (Policy 60, Procedures, Section 7). 

You may be assigned the Fundamentals of Academic Integrity Quiz.

You may be assigned a maximum of 3 workshops conducted by Student Life & Learning Support, the Academic Integrity Office, and/or the Ryerson Library.

Failure to complete the Quiz and/or Workshop (s) may result in you being prevented from graduating.

If education is determined to be needed, you can be assigned the Fundamentals of Academic Integrity (FAI) Quiz and/or Student Learning Support and/or Ryerson Library workshop(s). You can be assigned a maximum of 3 workshops.

Failure to complete these requirements may result in you not being able to graduate.

You will receive a “DEF” in place of a grade until the suspicion matter is settled. Your professor will submit the appropriate grade change form.

Progressive Discipline and Repeated Misconduct

Suspicions of academic misconduct are considered in isolation.  (i.e.  One finding of academic misconduct does not influence the decision on a different case.) However, if there is more than one finding of academic misconduct (i.e. more than one DN on your academic record), Progressive Discipline may be applied.  Progressive Discipline is the assignment of additional penalties/consequences on top of what was assigned for each case.

For a complete description of this process, please see PDF filePolicy 60, opens in new window, Section 9 and PDF filePolicy 60: Procedures, opens in new window, Sections 7 & 12.