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Brand Architecture

The Ryerson brand architecture defines the relationships of entities within the university. This section outlines the brand classifications and provides tools to help you determine how you can strengthen your brand as well as the Ryerson brand.

Our goal is to create a clear framework and to unify communications across the diverse units so that Ryerson's voice can rise above the noise.

Please connect with University Relations to determine where you fit into the brand architecture. Contact ryersonbrand@ryerson.ca with requests.

Brand Classifications

The university brand is the overarching identity of the university. It is the voice used in top-level communications and when the university is speaking as one unified entity.

Brand Impression: “This is Ryerson University.”
Examples: Alumni, Human Resources

University branded communications consistently use all elements of the visual toolkit, except the tertiary palette.

Visual Toolkit Elements

  1. Lock-up System
    University Brand Lock-up; Available to Use 
    Legacy Icons; Cannot Use 

  2. Typography & Type Style
    Primary Typeface; Available to Use 
    Secondary Typeface; Available to Use 

  3. Photography
    Photography Style; Available to Use 

  4. Colour
    Primary Palette; Available to Use 
    Secondary Palette; Available to Use 
    Tertiary Palette; Cannot Use 

  5. Graphic Device
    Use of Graphic Device; Available to Use 
A poster featuring Ryerson’s quad with two overlapping rectangles overtop. The rectangles are light blue and yellow.

This example illustrates how University Brands use the elements of the visual toolkit.

SRC/Academic brands are parts of the university that are most closely associated with its mission of learning and scholarly, research and creative activity.

Brand Impression: “This is part of what Ryerson does as a university.”
Examples: Faculty of Engineering and Architectural Science, School of Fashion

Academic/SRC brands have more flexibility of the visual toolkit to differentiate their brand. The following elements are consistently used.

Visual Toolkit Elements

  1. Lock-up System
    Academic/SRC Lock-up; Available to Use 

  2. Typography & Type Style
    Primary Typeface; Available to Use 
    Secondary Typeface; Available to Use 

  3. Photography
    Photography Style; Available to Use 

  4. Colour
    Primary Palette; Available to Use 
    Secondary Palette; Available to Use 
    Tertiary Palette; Available to Use 

  5. Graphic Device
    Use of Graphic Device; Available to Use 
A poster that uses a purple rectangle and a pink squiggle. The Faculty of Arts is on the bottom left corner.

This example illustrates how Academic/SRC Brands use the elements of the visual toolkit.

Sub-brands are part of the university, but they revolve around activities beyond its mission of learning and scholarly, research and creative activity. They are managed by university administration. 

Brand Impression: “This is connected to Ryerson, but different than its core learning function.”
Examples: Ryerson Rams, Ryerson Eats

The use of the visual toolkit is flexible. The university photography style, graphics devices and tertiary colour palette are optional elements of a sub-brand’s visual language. A sub-brand may develop its own versions of these components. 

Visual Toolkit Elements

  1. Lock-up System
    Sub-Brand Lock-up; Available to Use 

  2. Typography & Type Style
    Primary Typeface; Available to Use 
    Secondary Typeface; Available to Use 

  3. Photography
    Photography Style; Available to Use 

  4. Colour
    Primary Palette; Available to Use 
    Secondary Palette; Available to Use 
    Tertiary Palette; Available to Use 

  5. Graphic Device
    Use of Graphic Device; Available to Use 
A Ryerson Rams poster with a featured soccer player as a full bleed image. There are no overlapping rectangles.

This example illustrates how Sub-Brands use the elements of the visual toolkit.

Independent brands are associated with the Ryerson community, but are independently managed by students or other external stakeholders. These might include certain student groups, community events or companies started at the DMZ. 

Brand Impression: “This is independent from Ryerson University.”
Examples: Ram in the Rye, Ryerson Students’ Union

Independent brands are not restricted by the visual toolkit.

Visual Toolkit Elements

  1. Lock-up System
    Does not lock-up with the Ryerson Logo; Cannot Use 

  2. Typography & Type Style
    Primary Typeface; Cannot Use 
    Secondary Typeface; Cannot Use 

  3. Photography
    Photography Style; Cannot Use 

  4. Colour
    Primary Palette; Cannot Use 
    Secondary Palette; Cannot Use 
    Tertiary Palette; Cannot Use 

  5. Graphic Device
    Use of Graphic Device; Cannot Use 
A Ram in the Rye poster advertising St.Patrick’s day at the Ram. There are no elements of the visual toolkit visible at all.

This example illustrates how Independent Brands use the elements of the visual toolkit.