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  • ENG 101 - Laughter and Tears: Comedy and Tragedy
    Laughter and tears are not always straightforward. A tale of pride going before a fall can be reassuring to us as well as sad, and a Hollywood romantic comedy can encode a scathing social critique. Offering insight into our ongoing fascination with the extremes of human emotion, this course traces how the twin poles of the comic and tragic have developed through literary history, and how they vary across diverse cultural traditions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 104 - The Short Story
    As a relatively new genre that burst on the literary scene with the emergence of magazine culture, the short story is a truly modern form. Its excitement has to do with the concision of its form and the startling turns its narratives can offer. This course explores the history and conventions of the genre, examining stories from a variety of cultural contexts representing a range of styles, themes, and social issues.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in BA English, ACS English Option, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 110 - Literatures Across Borders
    Literature shapes and is shaped by the world we live in. It straddles the borders between nations, personal and collective histories, and narrative forms. In this course, students engage with diverse literary forms, themes, locations, and historical contexts; and develop skills for critical analysis and the creation of sustained, organized, and well-reasoned arguments.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: ENG 108
  • ENG 112 - Zap, Pow, Bang: Pop Lit
    Horror stories, pop songs, love poetry, comics-this course introduces students to various types of writing that were popular at different times and in different cultures. Students will learn central concepts and terminology in the study of popular writing and culture, and they will analyze the impact that cultural and political issues have had not only on what works became popular but also on the very notion of "the popular" itself.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: ENG 703
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in BA English, ACS English Option, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 200 - Writing as a Cultural Act
    We live our lives through networks of texts, both printed and digital. This course takes a rhetorical perspective to explore how written texts provide more than just information: they perform important cultural actions in contemporary civic life. Students examine the relationship of writing to knowledge, belief, and social organization in contexts such as popular and social media, politics and activism, literature and art, and professional, technical, and academic cultures.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • ENG 201 - Myth and Literature
    From classical poetry to video games, stories follow recognizable patterns that tell us much about our values, fears, and desires. Offering a fertile source for plots and themes, myth systems present a set of limits to be investigated, challenged, and rewritten. This course examines how plays, poems, novels, and/or other texts engage with myth. Topics may include such diverse ideas as masculinity, initiation, fellowship, betrayal, rebirth, exile and homecoming.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in BA English, ACS English Option, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 203 - The Literature of Indigenous Peoples
    How has colonialism impacted Indigenous cultures, and how have Indigenous people used texts to pose challenges to colonialism and to preserve and retell traditional stories? Reading contemporary literature by Aboriginal Australian, Maori, First Nations and other Indigenous writers, students address these and other important socio-political questions, examine wider literary and theoretical issues, and consider questions regarding cultural identity raised in the writings of Indigenous peoples.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • ENG 208 - Introduction to Non-Fiction
    Stories come to us in many forms including life writing, travel writing, documentaries, historical testimony, political speeches, journalistic texts and scientific and legal discourse. In this course, students read and write about non-fiction in a variety of forms across diverse historical periods and media.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 212 - Cultures in Crisis
    Using novels, short stories, films and other media, this course focuses on significant challenges faced by, and changes initiated in, a wide range of cultures. From the perspectives of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, ability, mobility, and ongoing negotiations of identity within multicultural and im/migrant communities, course materials illuminate the complex nature of modern experience and draw attention to the important questions and concerns cultures have faced and continue to face.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in BA English, ACS English Option, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 222 - Fairy Tales and Fantasies
    Starting with the powerful images of folk tale, fairy tale, and legend, and following them through fantasies and animal tales, this course explores their evolution from oral stories for adults to literary versions for children. It will also examine the intellectual and historical influences of the periods. The material to be studied includes modern versions of the tales in print and visual media.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • ENG 223 - Literatures of Exile and Migration
    Recent years have seen the largest movement of people from their homeland since WWII. We live in an era of increased mobility with national borders alternately porous and reinforced as nations welcome new refugees and immigrants or strive to keep them out. In this course, students read both fiction and nonfiction narratives about the experiences of exile and migration, and the possibilities and anxieties brought by the global movement of populations.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 204
  • ENG 224 - Children's Literature
    This course examines children's literature as a cultural category that shapes and is shaped by changing notions of "the child" and childhood. Students explore the ways in which texts directed at children's instruction and entertainment relate to their time, place, and generic form. Topics may include fiction; picture books; comics; film; and poetry.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • ENG 302 - Practicum: Writing in the Arts
    From grants, scripts and interviews to story pitches, reviews, profiles and publicity copy, professional writers in the Arts shape the sounds and sights of contemporary culture. In this experiential course, students gain first-hand experience of writing from different sectors within the Arts.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 208
    Antirequisites: ENG 303, ENG 304, ENG 306, ENG 307, ENG 390
    Custom Requisites: Available only to ACS English, BA English, BA English and History Double Major and BA English and Philosophy Double Major students.
  • ENG 304 - Practicum: Making Digital Work
    Students explore the potentialities of using digital tools and technologies for literary creation and literary studies through the study and discussion of scholarship concerning intersections of the digital and literary by designing and developing a digital project. Projects can take the form of digital editions, exhibits, or archives, multimedia and hypermedia writing and scholarship, interactive fiction and essays, and story-rich or serious games. Prior digital skills are not required.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 208
    Antirequisites: ENG 302, ENG 303, ENG 306, ENG 307, ENG 390
    Custom Requisites: Available only to ACS English Option, BA English, English-History and English-Philosophy double major students.
  • ENG 306 - Practicum: Writing Poetry
    This experiential course offers students the opportunity both to study models of good poetry writing and to explore their own creative abilities. Class discussions and workshop groups are designed to enhance students' writing capacities as they participate in the creative process. Areas of discussion involve the craft of poetry, including style, prosody, poetics, revision, and self- and peer-editing.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 208
    Antirequisites: ENG 302 and ENG 303 and ENG 304 and ENG 307 and ENG 390
  • ENG 307 - Practicum: Writing Fiction
    This experiential course offers students the opportunity both to study models of good fiction writing and to explore their own creative abilities. Class discussions and workshop groups are designed to enhance students' writing capacities as they participate in the creative process. Areas of discussion involve the craft of fiction, including style, prosody, poetics, revision, and self-editing and peer-editing.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 208
    Antirequisites: ENG 302 and ENG 303 and ENG 304 and ENG 306 and ENG 390
  • ENG 390 - Practicum: Open Topics
    Topics for this experiential course vary from year to year, in order to allow instructors and students to take advantage of new opportunities for applying literary knowledge. For information about the experiential and/or service learning topic each year, students should check the Department of English website or contact the Program Administrator.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 208
    Antirequisites: ENG 302, ENG 303, ENG 304, ENG 306, ENG 307
    Custom Requisites: Available only to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 400 - Literary and Cultural Theory
    Critical theory has become indispensable to the discipline of English studies today. This course is designed to familiarize the student of English literature with a wide range of theoretical debates in the discipline, challenging established notions of literature, text, and culture. The course provides students with a theoretical vocabulary with which to understand and analyse social and cultural phenomena, with particular attention to the politics of the production of knowledge and culture.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 810 and (ENG 302 or ENG 303 or ENG 304 or ENG 306 or ENG 307 or ENG 390). Available only to ACS English Option, BA English, English-History and English-Philosophy double major students.
  • ENG 402 - Comics

    The Comics medium is notable both for the way it employs a sophisticated "visual vocabulary", and for how the interplay between text and image allows for the presentation of time and space in unique ways. Students explore how comics challenge the conventions of narrative and artistic medium, and how the term "graphic novel" itself has sparked a contentious debate about their positioning relative to the distinction between "high" and "low" culture.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 408 - World Literatures
    The intense globalization, connectivity, and hypermobility of the present age make it increasingly difficult to isolate literature within the terms of individual nations, languages, and cultures. World Literatures seeks to better understand transnational realities encountered through writing such as novels, short stories, poems, plays, and other media. Students explore national and transnational identities, cross-cultural migrations, and digital connectedness, focusing on interdisciplinary and international visions of global society.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 409 - Urban Literatures
    How does the city change the ways that writers write and readers read? Focusing on the city as both physical and imaginary space, students examine the dynamic ways in which authors have given shape to urban experience in different historical periods and across various genres. Topics may include: architecture and space; the city and the nation; the individual and the community; anonymity and the crowd; cosmopolitanism; and intersections of race, gender, class, and power.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 413 - Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures
    This course introduces students to one of the key areas of critical interest and debate in English studies, postcolonialism, and invites them to reflect upon and discuss the ways in which Empire - in its historical and present day manifestations - shapes "third world" or the "developing" world's relationship with the West. It also familiarizes students with some of the most exciting and politicized theoretical debates in the discipline.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 416 - American Literatures
    Students study some of the most prominent efforts of writers to give voice and shape to the promises and perils of American experience. Situating the literature in local, national and global contexts, students critically examine the forces that have shaped past and present understandings of "America" in diverse forms and genres.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 417 - Special Topics in American Literatures
    In this course, students engage in intensive study of a particular topic in American literature organized around a major author or work (e.g. Toni Morrison, Moby Dick), an idea (e.g. realism, cultural memory, feminism), a genre (e.g. crime fiction, the slave narrative), a historical period (e.g. the Civil War, the Beat Generation), a region (e.g. Southern literature, New York City), or a literary movement (e.g. Transcendentalism, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Mountain School).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 421 - 16C Literature and Culture
    This course examines literary and cultural texts from the 16th century that capture the vibrancy of Europe as it transforms from a feudal to a modern society. Students explore works by figures such as Marlowe, Machiavelli, and Michelangelo. Topics may include the "Renaissance man," discourses of Orientalism and imperialism, evolving notions of the individual, the monarch and the state, and changing conceptions of gender and sexuality as they affect the period's literature, theatre, and art.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 422 - 17C Literature and Culture
    This course examines British literature and culture of the 17th century, when England becomes the centre of the European Renaissance. Students investigate a range of genres - including poetry, prose, and drama - produced by writers such as Shakespeare, Milton, Ford, and Behn. Topics may include English culture and imperialism, the significance of English Renaissance literature in the Commonwealth, the socio-political impact of canonized texts, and the study of stage and other art forms of the period.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 503 - Science Fiction
    The mythology of our civilization is the story of things to come. The prophetic visions of writers such as Asimov, Brunner, Clarke, Gibson, Heinlein, Herbert, Hogan, LeGuin, Lem and Niven offer endless playgrounds for the imagination. Their second gift is a widening vista or real alternatives: our future may be what they let us choose to make it. If you want to play an informed part in that choice, this course will provide the menu.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 504 - The Modern in Literature 1900-1945
    The era between 1900 and 1945 experienced such a radical sense of its own difference from the past that it is still referred to as the Modern Age. It was an age of new thought, new fashion, and a new sense of the self. In literature, it was an age of experimentation. This course explores the literature and the cultural influences of the period. Such writers as Virginia Woolf and James Joyce will be studied.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 505 - Creative Writing
    This upper-level course offers students the opportunity both to study models of good writing and to develop their own creative abilities. Class discussions and workshop groups are designed to enhance the student's understanding of the creative process, to stimulate the imagination, and to develop individual abilities. Areas of discussion include style, prosody, conflict, character, dialogue, and revision.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 507 - Science and the Literary Imagination
    This course deals with the impact of innovation in scientific theory on the themes and forms of literature. It considers in what ways contemporaneous literary texts reflected the implications for human identity and significance of these great shifts in understanding.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 510 - Gothic Horror
    Invented over 200 years ago, the gothic has become one of the most popular genres in literature and film. This course will explore the gothic presence in popular culture during this time. Students will analyze ways in which the genre challenges not only other cultural conventions, but also claims in the realms of art, science, and medicine. Topics to be addressed include the relation of the gothic to gender, sexuality, class, orientalism, imperialism, and criminality.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: ENG 580
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 511 - The Art of Writing Life
    This course examines a variety of life-writing genres including the diary, letter, autobiography, memoir, and biography. By sampling a range of texts (both print and electronic) throughout history, students will explore diverse ways in which writers express their private and public stories about life and self. Students will gain an understanding of life-writing theory which can be used to rethink the relationships between gender and genre; fact and fiction; and art and artlessness.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: ENG 570
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 517 - Techniques and Topics in Creative Writing
    In this introductory course, students learn the foundational craft elements and major issues of one or more genres of creative writing. They write in-class and take-home exercises, read, discuss, and anatomize published writing, and participate in peer-to-peer workshops in order to refine their art of self-expression and communication. Students also immerse themselves in topics animating contemporary writing, such as originality, citation, intertextuality, and writing in the digital age.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 520 - The Language of Persuasion
    What makes a political speech "good"? Why are some advertisements more effective than others? This course focuses on the crucial role of rhetoric in cultural communication: the means through which language is mobilized to persuasive ends. Students learn a critical vocabulary drawn from a variety of perspectives and explore persuasion in contemporary discourse, including print and online media, television, film, public events, and art, in order to understand how language achieves its most powerful effects.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110 or ENG 200
  • ENG 529 - Controversies in Public Discourse
    How do controversies arise in public discourse? Who participates in them, what arguments do they use, and what are their effects? Students study a specific controversy on topics such as medicine, the environment, social policy, or race to define its rhetorical situation, identify key stakeholders, and evaluate arguments in diverse genres or media. Students practice strategies of advocacy, and learn how communication practices and ethics in public discourse shape civic knowledge, human belief, and action.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110 or ENG 200
  • ENG 530 - Literary Non-Fiction
    This course examines forms of literary non-fiction such as essays, travel writing, journalism, and biography. Students explore how such works - in their artfulness, seriousness of ideas, and promise of authenticity - represent, persuasively and often polemically, the complexities of modern human experience.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 531 - 18C Literature and Culture
    Eighteenth-century literature and culture introduces many traditions that we describe as quintessentially of our own time. Students explore the eighteenth century as the beginning of "modernity." Topics may include globalization; feminism; middle class culture and the novel; the Gothic and sensibility; notions of sex, gender, ethnicity, and nationality; and philosophies of the individual.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 532
  • ENG 540 - The Novel
    What does it mean for a novel to tell its story in the form of a picaresque, an epistolary exchange, or as speculative or experimental fiction? This course offers an in-depth exploration of the novel in its many genres, drawing examples from different historical periods, cultural traditions, and literary movements. In addition to studying theoretical approaches to the novel, students examine how writers have developed and responded to its generic conventions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 550 - Drama
    The word "drama" derives from the Greek term for "to do" or "achieve": this course considers texts designed to come alive on stage. The diversity of dramatic forms is explored through in-depth study of texts from different historical periods and cultures. Students examine questions related to the script, its performance, and its reception, as well as the ways in which the material and social conditions have influenced the development of the genre.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 560 - Poetry and Poetics
    Ancient bards, sonneteers, rappers; nursery rhymes, love lyrics, inauguration odes: poetry has always been part of lived experience. This course considers the poetics, politics, and social practices that produce new forms of creative responses in poetry. Examining a range of poetic strategies and genres selected from different historical periods, cultural locations, and literary movements, students investigate how artistic tensions, traditions, and formal challenges are posed by writers who continually attempt to enhance the art's potential.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 570 - Auto/Biography
    This course examines autobiographical writings (including the diary,memoir, and letter) and biography (including literary and popular forms), and the connections between them. The study of life-writing sources may also include print and electronic sources, as well as film, photography, visual art, and performance art. Critical and theoretical readings are introduced to analyze issues including genre, aesthetics, identity, veracity, and commerce.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 511
  • ENG 580 - The Gothic
    Ever since it rose from 18th-century popular consciousness like a mummy from the crypt, the gothic has spread its frightening spawn across populations and cultures around the world. This course will explore and theorize various manifestations of the gothic and its sociopolitical functions over a broad span of time. Texts may include graveyard poetry, horror film, southern gothic, and goth culture. Issues to be addressed may include xenophobia, sexual diversity, ethnic migrations and animality.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 510
  • ENG 590 - Studies in Word and Image
    From illuminated manuscripts to graphic novels, words have always been accompanied by images that combine aesthetic design with intellectual expressiveness. This course examines the ways in which visual/verbal relations have changed in different times and places, and interrogates the complex inter-relationships of technology, style, form, and culture. Topics vary but may include illumination, emblems, chapbooks, illustrated magazines and periodicals, illustrated books, picture books, graphic novels, comics, and hypertext.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 602 - Women's Writing
    What does it mean to "write as a woman"? Is there such a thing as "women's writing" and if so, what are its characteristics? This course explores the ways in which women have contributed to literary traditions both by working within and by challenging mainstream movements. In examining women's use of literary forms as aesthetic, personal and political sites, we will consider how issues of identity and historical context inflect and inform their writing strategies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: ENG 621
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 604 - The Contemporary in Literature: Post 1945
    Imaginative writing of the post-war period reflects the complexity of contemporary life. In themes as old as folk tales and as current as new visions of space, writers express the dreams and terrors of post-nuclear life. It is an era in which values and beliefs have been challenged and conventional distinctions - illusion and reality, fact and fiction, the sacred and the profane - have been called into question by writers as diverse as Margaret Atwood and Michael Ondaatje.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 610 - The Language of Love, Sex and Gender
    Love, sex, and gender are fluid and complex. Looking at stories, novels, films, and other types of texts, students will analyse the impact of literature, popular culture, and aesthetics on the formation of new notions of gender, sexuality, and desire. Emphasis will be placed on a consideration of the cultural and sociopolitical influences that contributed to these changes and on the possibility of affections, sexualities, and genders that may not yet have names.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: ENG 941
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is not available for credit to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 611 - Film and Literature
    Students explore the longstanding and ongoing interaction between global cinema and literatures by studying a variety of literary and cultural texts in relation to cinema. Global cinematic movements and genres such as Silent cinema, Classical Hollywood cinema, German Expressionism, Surrealism, Italian Neorealism, French New Wave, American/Spaghetti Western, Feminist Film, Postmodern, Postcolonial, Bollywood cinema will be analyzed alongside literary and theoretical texts to understand the dialogue between Film and Literature in an increasingly globalized world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 620 - English Caribbean Literatures and Cultures
    The lives of peoples from the English-speaking Caribbean are extensively explored in dramatic works, films, music, art, novels and stories produced in the region and by Caribbean expatriates in Canada, the US and the UK. By situating examples of such works within their cultural contexts, the course raises a number of questions about Caribbean identities and experience and uses these questions to illuminate the history, struggles, and triumphs of these peoples and to imagine future possibilities.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • ENG 621 - Women's Texts, Global Contexts
    This course introduces students to literary and cultural works by women writers across the globe. Students will read and discuss narratives by writers from a range of backgrounds, paying particular attention to the ways in which "women" and "gender" as political and cultural categories are constructed through the vectors of race, culture, politics, and sexuality.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 602
  • ENG 623 - Film/Literature: Middle East,North Africa

    The Middle Eastern and North African region has a rich and diverse cultural history. It is also greatly misunderstood in the West because of a long history of colonial interference and political conflict. Students in this course develop an understanding of the region's cultures through critical analyses and discussions of literary texts and films. Some texts are in English translation, and some films are English subtitled. Prior knowledge about the region is not required.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 624 - 20C Literature and Culture
    Twentieth-century literature and culture is characterized by extraordinary innovation, vibrancy, and diversity. In this momentous period, many lived by the maxim "make it new," while others reconnected with tradition in the face of unprecedented changes in technology, politics, and popular culture. Students explore central ideas and historical pressures underlying twentieth-century cultural production by studying responses of modernist and postmodernist artists, writers, and filmmakers to the chaotic upheavals and opportunities that defined their world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 626
  • ENG 632 - 19C Literature and Culture
    From Romanticism to the emergence of modernism, nineteenth-century British literature and culture are characterized by revolutionary new ways of understanding the individual and society. Students examine how diverse literary and visual texts shaped and responded to changing social conditions, ideologies, and media. Topics may include science and the supernatural; the neo-gothic; childhood; nature and ecology; gender, race, and class; consumer culture; decadence and aestheticism; emerging technology; and imperialism.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 633
  • ENG 634 - Romantic Explorations
    Students study the period 1780-1830 in depth, focusing on a particular topic, which may include: experimentation with genre (the novel, theatre, poetic forms, essays and letters); explorations of other regions and cultures, or of human nature and the imagination; themes such as childhood, sexuality, the sublime; nature, climate and ecology; the city; engagements with other media, and with popular and/or visual culture.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 635 - Modernism
    Students examine the literatures, movements, and cultures of transatlantic Modernism (1885-1945). Canonical fiction, poetry, and autobiography is studied alongside the political manifestos, magazines, advertisements, and newspapers of the period. Digital recovery projects supplement print materials to provide a comprehensive introduction to high-art and mass-mediated texts of the era.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 640 - Literatures of Asia and its Diasporas
    In this course, students are introduced to literature written by and about people across time periods and geographic spaces. Students explore forms and conventions of Asian literary works and consider questions pertaining to Asian cultures and the formation of Asian subjectivities. The course may be organized thematically or by specific geographical location.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 630
  • ENG 701 - Canadian Literatures
    How does a national literature reflect on its people? Works studied in this course may include various genres from colonial to contemporary times. Students examine critically Canada's national identity, as well as issues of language, gender, class, and ethnicity in the articulation of a national culture. This course considers how writers capture and captivate Canada (or not) in the imagination, and may examine literature in relation to film, music, and criticism.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 703 - Popular Literatures
    Students will learn to recognize and identify different conventions defining genres of popular literature such as romance and sensation; gothic and horror; and melodrama. The course will explore the relationship between texts and audiences, and how readers assign meaning to and make use of what they read. Students will study the origins of today's popular genres in books and other media and the sociocultural values embodied in such works.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 112
  • ENG 705 - Studies in Visual Cultures
    By exploring the ways images in photography, painting and film, as well as in literary and non-literary writing, are scripted and can be read as text, this course seeks to show how visuality organizes and shapes Western culture. Topics can include how such things as the invention of perspective and the visual technologies of photography and film have influenced philosophy and literature, and how the culture industries have used the visual as a tool to influence and entertain.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 706 - Shakespeare and Performance
    Shakespearean drama was an important medium for entertainment and for reflecting contemporary socio-political realities on stage. A mark of Shakespeare's continued relevance and popularity is the constant remaking of his plays in a variety of media. This course analyses the textual, thematic, historical, and theoretical readings of Shakespearean drama. Students explore a variety of adaptations, including folk performance, early-modern theatre, television, and film.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 707 - Shakespeare and His World
    Students critically examine Shakespeare's work in the context of the Renaissance world. A diversity of texts, such as comedy, tragedy, romance, problem play, and love poetry are analyzed in relation to literary and historical sources, theatrical history, dramaturgical forms, and the social, religious and political context of the Renaissance.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 710 - Special Topics in Canadian Literatures
    What kind of topics fascinate Canadian writers? Students explore special topics in Canadian Literatures. Topics vary from year to year but may be organized thematically, regionally, stylistically, historically or around the work of a specific author. For information about the topic each year, students should check the Department of English website or contact the Program Administrator.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 720 - Persuasion from Plato to Present
    Aristotle defined rhetoric over 2000 years ago as the art of discovering, in any given case, the available means of persuasion. Since then, views on persuasion have shifted in tenor and scope but all emphasize its role in shaping public life. Offering a survey from ancient Greek and Roman texts through to contemporary rhetorical criticism and related fields, this course examines how we use rhetoric to negotiate knowledge, belief, and action in various contexts.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110 or ENG 200
  • ENG 730 - The Social Life of Books
    From the invention of the printing press in the fifteenth century to the electronic publications of the digital age, books have been central to the shaping of culture and society. This course investigates the relationship between authors, readers and publishers from interdisciplinary, transnational, and multimedia perspectives. Subjects include the reception, production, composition, material existence, and social life of books in diverse times, places, and forms.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 810 - Advanced English Research Methods
    English scholars use a variety of research methods, including archival, ethnographic, bibliographic, and digital. This course explores a range of research methods and contemporary methodological debates, providing a foundation for advanced work in the discipline. Students will be given practical opportunities for developing their own research skills in visits to the local archives and in a series of applied research assignments.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 208
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: This course is available only to students in ACS English Option, BA English, English-Philosophy and English-History double major programs
  • ENG 888 - Televisual Texts and Contexts
    Love it or hate it, television stands alone as a medium in its ability to influence the way we live and view the world. What is it about the immediacy of television that invites us to engage with it? Students will draw from literary studies, sociology, and anthropology to explore how the "flow" of television structures our time and our relations to one another, and how the "televisual" evolves as new communications technologies develop.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 904 - Independent Research Paper
    Students are provided individualized supervision in the selection of a topic, the planning and implementation of a research plan, and the writing of a research paper. Students must have a minimum 80 percent cumulative average in their best six ENG courses and department consent of the program prior to enrolling in this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • ENG 907 - Independent Research Project
    Students are provided with individualized supervision in the selection, planning, and implementation of an experiential project. Students showcase their literary, cultural, and research skills, and may liaise with local and national archives, institutions, businesses, and media in the development of their individual projects. Students must have a minimum 80 percent cumulative average in their best six ENG courses and department consent of the program prior to enrolling in this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • ENG 910 - English Capstone Seminar
    This required capstone seminar offers in-depth study of a specialized topic in a discussion-based setting. Students are guided in the development of advanced research, presentation, and writing skills and are required to write a major research paper. Course content varies according to the instructor's expertise.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • ENG 921 - Narrative in a Digital Age
    This course explores how contemporary writers and artists have attempted to come to terms with the so-called post-print era - a historical moment characterized by the strategies of fragmentation and recombination that digital hyperspaces make possible. By analysing digital texts and the work of cultural theorists on the nature and impact of this new medium, students will address the implications of the rise of computing and the internet for the future of literary and other cultural practices.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
  • ENG 941 - Gender and Sex in Literature and Culture
    We are surrounded by representations that both enable and prescribe how we interpret gender and sex. Students explore how popular culture, inter-personal communication, literature, film, and other media construct gender, sexuality, and desire. Students consider concepts such as non-binary and transgender identities, masculinities/femininities, and poly-sexuality through the cultural, social, and political influences that contribute to how we imagine ourselves as gendered beings.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110
    Antirequisites: ENG 610
  • ENG 942 - Postcolonial Interventions
    The course considers the interconnections and ongoing dialogue between postcolonial and colonial discourses and literatures, and the socio-historical contexts from which the texts and theories have emerged. In giving comprehensive coverage to literatures and theories produced within former British colonies (including settler colonies) and the neo-colonial world, we shall examine key issues relating to the role that language, race, nation, ethnicity, gender, and subaltern identities play in shaping experience and producing knowledge.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ENG 108 or ENG 110