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  • GEO 106 - Geographies of Everyday Life
    This course examines environmental and spatial aspects of human life, primarily at the scale of the individual, the neighbourhood and the community. Specific topics to be considered include sense of place, mental maps, territoriality, community dynamics, and human impacts on the landscape.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • GEO 108 - Geography of the Global Village
    This course explores the factors that contribute to and characterize globalization. Starting with a discussion of basic ecological concepts and the impacts of the industrial revolution on current global socio-economic and environmental issues, this course examines population dynamics, quality of life indicators and the world food system, and offers new strategies to deal with environmental degradation.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • GEO 110 - The Physical Environment
    In this course, the physical environment is investigated from the perspective of appreciating the natural limits that earth systems impose. Themes in climatology, hydrology and geomorphology are examined in order to develop an understanding of how natural balances originate, and afford opportunities and constraints for a modern lifestyle. Specific topics include weather systems, water budgets, erosion by streams and waves, and the enhancement of stability in natural systems.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • GEO 131 - Energy, Earth and Ecosystems
    This course takes a systems-based approach to understanding the dynamics of Planet Earth and how humans interact with it. The principles, concepts, and applications of physical and environmental geography are introduced through learning about the energy that drives our ecosystems, the resources on which we depend, and the environmental challenges facing Canadian society in a global context. One component of the course is field-based.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 141 - Geography and GIS
    This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of Geographical Information Systems (GIS). The value of the geographical perspective in addressing numerous societal problems is explored. GIS is introduced to the student with hands-on applications in a variety of areas, including public service, commercial enterprise and environmental analysis. In laboratory assignments students become familiar with the practical utility of both the geographical perspective and the tool of GIS.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 151 - Location, Location, Location
    This course provides an understanding of locational processes, especially those related to business (industry, retail, office) and residential land uses by concentrating on three themes. Social diversity examines how changing demographics create changes in neighbourhood characteristics. Economic restructuring considers how economic changes impact location and make-up of economic activities. Smart growth investigates managing city growth, while still maintaining healthy environments.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 161 - Introductory Analytical Techniques
    This course introduces the fundamentals of data and information extraction, descriptive statistics, data visualization, sampling distributions and the computer programs commonly used in geographic research. By the end of the course, students will be able to gather, order, and analyse data, extract information from those data, and present their findings in a work environment.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO125
  • GEO 206 - Regions, Nations and the Global Community
    This course examines spatial and environmental aspects of human life, primarily at the scale of the region, the nation and the global community. Specific topics to be considered include migration, regionalism, spatial equity and global interdependence.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • GEO 208 - Geography of the Global Economy
    This one semester course explores the changing geographic patterns of economy and settlement. Starting from a discussion about the relationships between technological systems, the economy and urbanization, this course considers patterns of deindustrialization, economic linkages, and changing settlement systems.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • GEO 210 - Geography of Danger
    The course examines dangers that arise from global threats posed by various natural and human-made hazards. From a Canadian perspective, it sets out to provide an understanding of how their potential for harm to the individual and community is perceived by the public. Mechanisms that have been developed to reduce the levels of threat to life and property are assessed. This is accomplished by examining selected geophysical, biological, climatic, environmental and malevolent factors that impinge on well-being.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • GEO 221 - Location Analysis
    Location is important in the success of both private and public facilities. This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of location analysis by addressing changing geographies of land uses, methodologies used in real-world applications of service area delimitation and site selection, and the dynamic geographies of supply and demand. The importance of tools such as geographical information systems (GIS) is considered and examples are drawn from public and private sectors. (formerly GEO 310)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 231 - Principles of Demography
    This course is designed to familiarize students with demography and demographic analysis. The course explores the characteristics of population (for example, age, sex, marital status) while using demographic analysis (data from surveys, vital statistics, and censuses) to build a basis for explanation of specific population trends in selected areas. There is emphasis on Canadian data and the implications of the current Canadian population structure for our future.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: Not Available to students in Environmental and Urban Sustainability.
  • GEO 241 - Cartographic Principles and Practice
    This course introduces the fundamental principles of cartography. It focuses on the knowledge and skills that are necessary to produce good quality maps within a digital environment. Special attention is given to the ways in which decisions in the cartographic process influence the geographic information communicated by the map.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO 281
  • GEO 281 - How to Lie with Maps
    This course offers an entertaining yet critical introduction to maps. Cartographic design can easily mislead the map reader and influence decision-makers, whether accidental or intended by the map-maker. Students will learn how to critically read different types of maps and experiment with making their own, truthful maps.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO 241
  • GEO 301 - Marketing Geography
    This course addresses the spatial aspects of business decision making. Emphasis is placed on measuring the factors and assessing the methods associated with site evaluation and market area analysis.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO 302
  • GEO 302 - Retail Location
    An introduction to techniques of spatial modelling, with emphasis on retail location and marketing geography. The course adopts a case study perspective with emphasis placed on the evaluation and application of geography theory and concepts.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO 301
  • GEO 312 - Viva Las Vegas!
    The city of Las Vegas is in some senses unique in its character and image, but it does exemplify many of the general issues associated with urban areas in North America today. The course explores the explanation of that character, both in terms of the uniqueness of Las Vegas and in terms of more general patterns and processes. In the course stress is placed on the development of general research and critical skills.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Custom Requisites: Not available to International Economics and Finance students
  • GEO 313 - Geography of the Physical Environment
    This course provides an introduction to the natural environment from a geographical perspective. Mapping, meteorology, climatology and hydrology are addressed conceptually and practically as they relate to the development of both understanding and applications. Physical processes and their resulting spatial expression are investigated in terms of how they relate to the promotion of environmental sustainability both locally and globally. The learning experience is comprised of lectures, research/readings, and a series of workshop and lab exercises.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 322 - A Critical Geography of South Asia

    This course introduces students to South Asia as a dynamic geo-political 'region', with a unique colonial history, uneven development, and shifting identities. In the first half of the course concepts such as postcolonialism, nationalism and nationhood are discussed. The second half focuses specifically on the differential geographies produced between and within South Asian nation states, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Nepal and Bhutan.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • GEO 326 - The Geography of Early Hominins
    This course examines the paleogeography of early hominins including discussion of the paleoclimatic, environmental, and resource changes that affected the number and geographic distribution of our early ancestors. Topics considered include the last 7 million years of the human family tree, the evolution and characteristics of its members, paleoclimatic and tectonic changes to the environments in which they lived and the subsequent effects on their evolution, and their regional distribution and how they got there.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 351 - Internal Structure of the City
    Interpretation of historical and present processes of growth and change is relevant to an understanding of contemporary urban areas. Public facility location, social services, housing and urban social communities are studied in detail. GIS is used to explore spatial equity and spatial efficiency, service areas, redistricting, and neighbourhood development.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 151 or GEO 418 or PLG 300
  • GEO 361 - Inferential Statistics in Geography
    This course is concerned with the application of inferential statistics in geographic analysis. It introduces students to estimation, hypothesis testing, and other statistical techniques. Emphasis throughout the course is placed on the application of the various techniques rather than on their mathematical derivations. It is assumed that students are familiar with the fundamental elements of statistics in a desktop computer environment.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 125 or GEO 161
  • GEO 372 - Global Shift in the 21st Century
    The world is rapidly becoming a technological and economic "global village" where distance has diminished in importance. Yet in the face of this increasingly 'smaller' but integrated world we see emergent territorial fragmentation where the distinctiveness and role of place has grown in significance. The purpose of this course is to explore the globalization phenomena and the resulting territorial, economic, demographic, conflict, development, resource, health, technological, cultural and environmental issues that arise from it.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO 910
  • GEO 411 - Resource and Environmental Planning
    This course provides a survey of concepts and approaches for resource and environmental planning. The relevance of the broad array of environmental, economic and social factors is considered. While the course is process oriented, case studies are used to assess critically the application of different methods to combine theory with the practical aspects of resource management in Canada.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 131 or GEO 303 or EUS 102
  • GEO 419 - Retailing, GIS and Geodemographics
    This course surveys practical, conceptual and methodological issues associated with the application of geographical techniques to retail marketing. A variety of GIS applications are introduced to delineate and analyse retail trade areas. The use of socioeconomic and demographic data at various spatial scales is emphasized. Methods include: geocoding, mapping, creation of market area profiles, population projections, clustering and interpretation of market segmentation data.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 421 - Geography of Retailing
    This course examines the transformation of the retail economy in the context of globalization and technology changes: from the declining roles of department stores and shopping centers to the emergence of big-box stores and power centers; from simple and linear to multiple distribution channels including e-tailing. This course also addresses, from a political-economy perspective, the important roles of the regulatory state in the process of the retail transformation. Both international and Canadian examples are provided.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 431 - Recreation Analysis
    Recreation and tourism are increasingly important in contemporary society, creating both positive and negative economic, social, and environmental effects at a variety of spatial scales. Many aspects of geographic inquiry are pertinent, including: location decision making concerning facilities and activities; the management and sustainability of recreation resources; and assessment of the impact of changing culture and economy upon regions. This course aims at providing a broad understanding of the spatial behaviour of recreationists and tourists.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 441 - Geographic Information Science
    This course provides students with a thorough understanding of the concepts, upon which Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software and geographic analysis techniques are based. Specific attention is directed at geographic representation, geospatial data modelling and analysis, and the inferences that arise in addressing practical problems. A variety of fields of GIS application are reviewed in lectures and hands-on lab exercises.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 141 or GEO 241
  • GEO 505 - Regional Analysis of Canada
    The regional structure of Canada provides the focus for this course. Attention is given to the internal characteristics and problems of various regions, and to the interrelations which bind the regions together in a national framework. Emphasis is placed upon regional disparity, regional development concepts, and social and environmental variables.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 507 - Explorations of the Urban Environment
    This course examines the internal structure of the contemporary city from a geographic viewpoint. The course is issue-oriented and focuses on transportation, housing and other land use problems and solutions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Not available to students in Urban and Regional Planning
  • GEO 509 - Food, Place and Identity
    This course examines the role of provenance and place in the evolution of diet. In defining the geography of food as who eats what where and why, it considers how food's importance extends beyond mere nourishment; food is an idiom that provides individual and collective comfort and identity. However impoverished or affluent, contemporary cuisines are legacies of military conflict, colonization and commercial influence that have incorporated key, non-indigenous products that were introduced by the Columbian exchange.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Not available to students in Nutrition and Food.
  • GEO 513 - Physical Geography in Decision Support
    The origins of environmental conflicts and the information that supports environmental decision-making will be investigated from the perspective of physical geography. The role of data and information for understanding physical processes is traced from field observations to modelling, spatial analyses, prediction, and decision-making. Examples from the fields of climatology, hydrology, geomorphology and biogeography will be examined. The learning experience is comprised of readings, lectures, and the collection and analysis of primary and secondary data.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 514 - Resource Management in Northern Canada
    Northern Canada has experienced rapid change in recent years. Implementation of land claim settlements has introduced new approaches to resource management; global energy demands have renewed pressure for megaprojects, while toxins in the environment and climate change have created new environmental stresses. The course examines the underpinnings of these issues and demonstrates the role of geographic analysis in policy formulation and approaches to resource management in the contemporary North.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 131 or GEO 303
  • GEO 520 - Global Political Geography
    This one semester course provides geographical perspectives on political issues with an emphasis on the regional and global scale. Themes include geopolitics, global inter-dependence, regional integration, territoriality, and geographical sources of stress and conflict. Theoretical approaches will be used to inform current events.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 521 - Geodemographics
    This course surveys practical, conceptual, and methodological issues associated with the application of geographical techniques to marketing and retail site selection. Emphasis is placed on the use of socioeconomic and demographic data at various spatial scales. Methods include a variety of multivariate techniques focusing on market definition and segmentation, including extensive use of cluster analysis. The course also covers a multitude of management issues associated with the use of geodemographic and related data sets.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 221 or GEO 310
  • GEO 522 - Geography of the Middle East
    Today the Middle East is the focus of international attention because of its strategic geopolitical importance. This course examines this complex region of the world, which is rich in terms of its geography, history, culture, and resources. The focus will be particularly on the geographical characteristics of the region and its geopolitical centrality. The course provides an analysis of major issues, such as population displacement, water resources and inter- and intra-states conflicts.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 527 - Inequalities in Urban Neighbourhoods
    This course examines how social patterns, processes and issues vary across the city. Students will analyze spatial inequalities related to neighbourhoods and communities, residential segregation, and housing and homelessness and policies which address these. This course will include a field component.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 530 - Urban Economic Geography
    This course focuses on the organization of human activities from a spatial-economic perspective. Location analysis of activities ranging from agriculture to high technology will be examined. Concepts and processes underlying location decision making will be investigated with the aid of land-use, industrial location, and analogous theories. Locational factors for small firms to transnational organizations will be discussed and comparisons will be made between various geographic scales.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 541 - GIS Programming
    The purpose of this course is to teach students how to expand the functionality of out-of-the-box Geographic Information Systems. Topics focus on teaching students how to utilize programming to solve real world geographic problems by automating processes, building new applications, and expanding existing GIS functions. The course will use the most popular GIS software packages and programming languages. No programming experience is assumed nor required.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 441 or GEO 614
    Antirequisites: CODG 132
  • GEO 542 - Introduction to Remote Sensing
    This course introduces the fundamental concepts of remote sensing. Emphasis will be placed on techniques and applications involving resource management, environmental impact assessment, and urban analysis with medium and high-resolution imagery. The lab portion of this course is substantial and involves using the image processing and GIS software packages. (Formerly GEO 624)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 123 or GEO 141
  • GEO 551 - Urbanization and Regional Development
    A systems framework is used to examine the link between urbanization and regional development and examine prescriptive approaches to directing and managing growth and its consequences. Case examples, ranging from examination of planning issues in urban centered regions through to evaluation of development strategies for "marginal" regions, are used to demonstrate the practical role of geographic analysis in understanding and addressing problems arising from growth and disparity. (formerly GEO 618)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 151 or GEO 418 or PLG 300
  • GEO 553 - Studies in Rural Geography
    Although urbanisation has made the reliance on the rural areas less obvious, most Canadians still recognize their importance for non-basic employment, recreation, food production and waste disposal. The countryside also plays an environmental, symbolic and aesthetic role that defines the nation's image at home and abroad. Through a case study approach, the challenges faced by limited-resource regions and farming communities across Canada are examined with rural revitalization as the major theme. (formerly GEO 805)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 131 or GEO 303
  • GEO 561 - Multivariate Analytical Techniques
    This course familiarizes students with the most common current methods of multivariate analysis used by geographers. The approach is user-oriented, stressing the type of problem treated by each technique, the ability to run statistical package program, and the knowledge to interpret the results.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 225 or GEO 361
  • GEO 581 - GIS, Geographic Data and Mapping
    Students will learn about geographic data, and explore the power of visualization that comes from mapping them with Geographic Information Systems (GIS). GIS can transform data that are located on the earth's surface into information that can be utilized in social, economic, political and environment decision-making. Through lectures and labs, students will examine the use of GIS and maps in their own academic area of interest.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 605 - The Geography of the Canadian North
    The North is a unique region within Canada. Profound changes are taking place, including the economic dominance of the resource industry, the rise of Aboriginal political power, and questions surrounding Arctic sovereignty. All of these issues are underlain by the uncertainty of climate change and how best to adapt. This course will explore physical and social dimensions of the Canadian North and discuss how geographic analytical techniques can be applied to northern issues.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 607 - Cities and the Canadian Economic Landscape
    Urbanization is associated with a plethora of problems at both a regional and global level. The course explores the geographic dimensions of some of these problems addressing such questions as urban development and regional disparity in Canada, the impact of urban growth on surrounding areas, national and continental trends in population and settlement, and global perspectives on urbanization. (formerly GEO 407).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Not available to Urban and Regional Planning students.
  • GEO 609 - cyberspace@geography.ca
    This course examines the historical development of global communication systems, with emphasis on the growth, characteristics and impacts of the World-Wide Web on global socio-economic and environmental relationships. From World City Systems to rural and marginalized places around the globe, the examination and analysis of cyberspace proves useful in understanding a new geography that negates the "death of distance."
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: Not available to Computer Science or Business Technology Management students
  • GEO 612 - Environmental Decision Making
    This course involves the analysis of frameworks for the investigation and resolution of complex resource and environmental problems. In many cases such problems deal with the consideration of a wide variety of data and of a number of objectives. General methods to deal with such situations are presented. Application of these methods is demonstrated by a critical analysis of the technical practice of environmental analysis. (formerly GEO 604)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 131 or GEO 303
  • GEO 620 - Political Geog of Nations and Localities
    This one semester course provides geographical perspectives on political issues with an emphasis on the national and local scale. Themes include: nations and nationalism; the territorial state; geographical sources of stress at the local level; electoral geography; and the political geography of localities and everyday life. Theoretical approaches will be used to inform current events.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 621 - Location Analysis of Commercial Activity
    This course provides students with a set of advanced techniques for use in location analysis of commercial activities. The course is divided into two parts. Part I deals with analysis of market conditions and the business environment. Part II focuses on a variety of techniques related to site selection, trade area analysis, sales forecasting, and network planning for the optimization of a commercial chain. The modes of delivery include lectures, labs, and class discussion.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 627 - Accessibility of Urban Social Services
    In this course, students will analyze the location of social services and amenities, such as child care, medical care, education, libraries and recreational facilities; in particular how spatial variations in accessibility to these services impacts quality of life in neighbourhoods. Criteria and strategies for a healthy city will be investigated. (GEO 527 and GEO 627 are equivalent to GEO 27A/B).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 631 - Exploration in Travel and Tourism
    This course covers the subjects of historical tourism development, modern mass tourism and case studies of specific types of modern tourism. Niche tourism types that may be covered include medical tourism and death tourism. Emphasis is placed on tourist demand and the consequences to the tourism system and tourist-oriented sites. Examples are selected from international and Canadian tourism. (formerly GEO 806)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 641 - GIS and Decision Support
    This course introduces the characteristics of spatial decision problems and the conceptual approaches to solve them. Hands-on exercises with data from a variety of fields demonstrate the importance of spatial aspects in societal decision-making. The course advances the student's professional GIS skills and understanding of the geospatial concepts and methodologies to address real-world issues. (formerly GEO 814)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 441 or GEO 614
  • GEO 642 - Advanced Remote Sensing and GIS
    This course consists of three major components that will be explored within a framework of advanced geographic applications: (1) advanced techniques in digital image analysis, (2) the use of ancillary information sources, and (3) the integration, utilization, and visualization of image data within Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The integration of classified remotely sensed and GIS data within project management schemes will be a major focus of this course. (formerly GEO 824)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 542 or GEO 624
  • GEO 643 - Field Methods for Geospatial Data
    This course provides hands-on experience with field sampling techniques for various geospatial technologies. Students will acquire spatial data related to physical, environmental and human geography in the field and use these data for geographic analysis. Topics include research design, planning, sampling and data collection for remote sensing and GIS applications. A significant portion of this course will be spent in the field learning techniques and collecting data.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 441 and GEO 542
  • GEO 644 - Spatial Databases
    Spatial databases are a fundamental component of geographic information systems (GIS) and the basis for geographic analysis. This course introduces principles of database management and spatial data handling, including data models, database analysis and schema design. Representation and querying of geographic information will be discussed and accompanied by practical examples from selected application domains. The labs will introduce database management systems within and outside GIS, including distributed databases used in Web applications.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 441
  • GEO 645 - Place and Population Health
    The course introduces the geography of health and healthcare and methods in spatial and quantitative analyses used in mapping and analyzing health patterns, disease diffusion and access to care. It explores the impact of social, economic and environmental factors on the geographic inequalities in health and the availability and accessibility of healthcare services in developed and developing countries. Issues discussed may range from diabetes, obesity, asthma, TB, emerging viruses to physician maldistribution and healthcare reform.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 441
  • GEO 652 - Urban Transportation Systems
    This is a one semester course designed to examine theoretical and empirical aspects of urban transportation systems. Topics include descriptive and normative models of transportation flows, component parts of networks, models of growth processes and planning issues associated with urban transportation. A methodology is outlined to address the impact of development on the surrounding transportation network. Emphasized throughout are the spatial, economic and social consequences of transportation. (formerly GEO 608)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 225 or GEO 361
  • GEO 671 - Developmental and Environmental Law
    This course presents an overview of legal principles and concepts that relate to development and environmental issues. It examines the role of the Courts and administrative tribunals in resolving disputes that arise from these issues. Particular problems addressed include water, air and noise pollution, waste management, private land development, zoning conflicts and land use controls. (formerly GEO 709)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 681 - GIS and Geographic Analysis
    This course offers social science and human services students opportunities to examine many analytical functions available in GIS focusing on the data used within their programs of study. Students will understand the potential of GIS in decision support in many applications including crime, population health, service provision, and sustainable development. The labs will be scenario-driven, incorporating the analytical power of GIS to solve real-world problems in areas related to the academic interests of the students.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 691 - Canadian Immigration: Patterns and Place
    Offering a geographic perspective on Canadian immigration patterns and policies, this course examines the 'why, who and where' of Canadian immigrant experiences. There is a particular emphasis on the changes in Canada's spatial, social and economic landscapes as a result of Canadian immigration policies over time within the context of contemporary global economics and communication technologies and the inherent complexities of pluralistic societies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 702 - Technology and the Contemporary Environment

    The contemporary world is influenced to a very considerable extent by technology. However, relationships between this technology and our environment continue to be the subject of considerable public debate. The geographic dimensions of these environmental controversies provide a convenient and meaningful framework for their analysis. In this course, both recurring and contemporary environmental issues are examined in terms of implications for North American society. GEO 702 is not available for credit to students who choose GEO 703.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: GEO703
    Custom Requisites: Not available to students in Occupational and Public Health - Occupational Health and Safety option nor Public Health and Safety option
  • GEO 703 - Perspectives on Environmental Management
    The deterioration of ecosystems and growing societal intolerance for environmental damages have raised concerns over the management of the earth's resource base. First, this course examines how public attitudes towards the environment have evolved and the corresponding growth of public participation in environmental decision making. Secondly, emphasis is placed on the ecological basis for environmental planning and analysis. Finally, the growing body of laws, regulations and guidelines which are designed to control environmental behaviours are considered.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO 702
  • GEO 705 - Environment and Society in the Caribbean
    This course is issue oriented, and emphasizes the interrelatedness of historical, economic, social and cultural phenomena from a regional perspective. The Caribbean is a region because of the shared history, production systems, location in the global economy, patterns of cultural and physical background. Within this framework, the course will focus on contemporary issues and debates relevant to understanding the regional basis and diversity of the Caribbean.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 714 - GIS for the Municipal Professional I
    Geographic Information Systems represent a technology which permits the diverse data sets needed to administer a modern municipality to be outlined and given due consideration in reaching management decisions. This course provides students with practical knowledge and skills relating to the understanding and use of GIS. Particular attention is directed at how geographic relations are preserved, and the opportunities/constraints afforded by various GIS approaches. There is a 25 dollar lab fee for this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 716 - Geographies of Health
    This course investigates both the complexity of what we call health and disease, and the multiplicity of approaches with which health and disease are investigated and understood by geographers. Students learn to recognize the many ways in which individuals and groups alter and adapt to their multiple environments, thereby shaping their own health. Understanding how spatial data about disease and death is presented enables students to assess health information available on the web.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Not available to Nursing or Occupational and Public Health students
  • GEO 719 - GIS in Business: Strategic Mgmt Decisions
    The key to sustaining a business is to know one's customers. By geographically referencing customer records, and linking them to data such as demographics, GIS enables business enterprises to evaluate their client-catchment areas. This course provides an introduction to GIS in the business environment, by combining lecture material, readings from the professional literature, site visits for the evaluation of systems, and labs designed to provide practical and technical competence. There is a 25 dollar lab fee for this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 720 - The Inner Landscape of Culture
    What does it mean to live as a member of a particular culture? This course addresses the concept of culture as both a reflection and a determinant of human experience. Examples from Canadian and global settings support an exploration of the elements and processes of culture.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 724 - GIS for the Municipal Professional II
    This course introduces advanced municipal applications of Geographic Information Systems, such as school pupil forecasting; public health mapping; crime pattern analysis; social policy analysis and neighbourhood well-being; as well as transit accessibility modeling. Students will enhance their ability to conduct geographic analyses and produce professional geographic information products for government planning and decision-making. Hands-on experience is expanded. There is a 25 dollar lab fee for this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 1 hr. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 714 or GEO 719
  • GEO 771 - Practicum
    The practicum, also known as internship or co-op placement, is a compulsory part of the curriculum. It ensures that graduates can successfully integrate into a professional work environment. Positions must use and enhance the knowledge and skills acquired through coursework. Students gain practical work experience, improve their resumes and employability, and explore a career in Geography. (formerly GEO 700). This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.
    Weekly Contact: Lab: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: GEO 441 or GEO 614
  • GEO 772 - Individual Research Paper
    The Research Paper provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate proficiency in an area of applied geographic specialization through the design and execution of an original, independent and academically-based research project. (formerly GEO 815)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 773 - Field Studies
    This is an elective field course for Geographic Analysis students, which involves an extended stay in a national or international destination. The themes examined have direct links to the program concentrations in location, urban, and environmental analysis as well as geotechnologies. Additional topics related to the regional, economic and historical geography of the field trip destination are also examined. Recommended for third year and fourth year students, consult department for details. (Formerly GEO 500).
    Weekly Contact: Lab: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 793 - The Geography of Toronto
    Founded in 1793 on First Nations territories, Toronto is Canada's largest metropolitan area and arguably a world class city. Although Toronto may reflect some of the characteristics of Canada as a whole, it is a distinct geographical space. This course provides students with an understanding of Toronto, by examining interrelated historical, social, cultural, political, and environmental issues. Throughout the course, North American and global perspectives are considered, where appropriate.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Not available to students in Urban and Regional Planning
  • GEO 802 - The Geography of Recreation and Leisure
    This course explores recreation and leisure from a number of perspectives. It examines the relationship between recreational choice and demographic and life-style correlates, technology, and faddism. It evaluates symbolic recreational environments and the role of natural areas. It explores many of the social and environmental costs associated with recreational development. GEO 802 is not available for credit to students who choose GEO 803.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: GEO 803
  • GEO 803 - Recreation and Tourism Analysis
    The growing importance of the recreation and tourism system in today's society has generated the potential for environmental impacts and development opportunities. This professionally related course examines the system and its role in the economy. Particular emphasis will be placed on planning, managing and developing recreation and tourism resources, and on identifying, measuring and evaluating impacts.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: GEO 802
  • GEO 811 - Global Environmental Issues
    This one-semester course is structured to address a series of central themes relating to an understanding of concerns about the global environment. For each, a specific environmental issue is highlighted and a case study or case studies is used to demonstrate the nature of the theme and its broad relevance to an understanding of the global situation. A principal goal of the course is to enhance students' appreciation for an understanding of the state of the world environment and of the challenges and priorities for action to address such issues at a global scale.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 820 - The Outer Landscape of Culture
    This course examines the ways in which cultures express themselves through natural, built, and symbolic landscapes. The nature and significance of cultural change are considered at both regional and global scales.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • GEO 871 - The Professional Geographer
    In this capstone course, students are mentored to integrate theory and practice to solve real-world problems. The course challenges students to apply their cumulative knowledge and experiences to address representative geographical tasks in government, private, and non-profit sector scenarios. The learning objectives include critical thinking, technical proficiency, and professional aptitude. Practitioners of applied geography may be invited to speak with students about the diverse opportunities and expectations in the workplace. (formerly GEO 744).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 873 - Geographic Entrepreneurship and Consulting
    Drawing upon geographic and analytical skills developed throughout the program students work in consultant groups for outside clients in the public and private sectors. The students' consulting reports often inform the client's policies or operations. Through these real-world applications, students gain entrepreneurial experience and start developing their professional networks. (formerly GEO 844)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • GEO 911 - GIS and Fire Services Management
    Accessing information regarding sites is recognized as critical to the goals of preventing and suppressing fires. With Geographic Information Systems (GIS), location is the primary key for retrieving data, so site information can be very conveniently accessible. This course provides an overview of GIS for urban and rural Fire Services by introducing application opportunities, system components, and implementation issues. The format is a combination of lectures, and practical hands-on workshops.
    Weekly Contact: Lab: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00