Skip to main content
  • INT 555 - Special Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies
    This course gives students the opportunity to examine a particular set of social issues from a range of disciplinary perspectives. With the aid of this interdisciplinary approach, students come to appreciate how findings from different methods of social enquiry can be combined to produce fresh insights and new models of practice. The particular theme, topic and structure of the course will vary in response to current social trends and student interest.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • INT 900 - Program Planning and Evaluation Strategies
    This course will examine methods of program planning and evaluation that are applicable to health promotion practice. Students will study frameworks for planning human service programs and how evaluation is used for assessment of program effectiveness, for improvement of programs and for guiding resource allocation and policy development. (Formerly IST 900.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 901 - Gerontology: Critical Issues and Future Trends
    This course will assess the influence of Canadian and world demographic trends on the community services for the elderly; assess the influence of recent Canadian research in the field of aging on the community services of the future; examine innovative and traditional programs administered both by government and private agencies in the Western industrial countries and evaluate their relevance for Canada. (Formerly IST 901.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 902 - Disability Issues
    This course examines disability issues within a socio-political context. Such a perspective contends that it is not the specific type of disability condition which is the major source of disadvantage to the individual but the response that this condition evokes from the larger society. This course will challenge some of the traditional (and damaging) assumptions made about the needs of people labelled as being disabled and will present a framework for policy and practice designed to promote empowerment and inclusion. (Formerly IST 902.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 904 - Health Promotion and Community Development
    Students will be introduced to the history and development of health promotion and will examine health determinants from environmental, cross-cultural, psychosocial and biological perspectives. The focus will be on the exploration of health promotion strategies which incorporate community development, popular education and social marketing models. (Formerly IST 904.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 905 - Conflict Resolution in Community Services
    Professionals in a wide range of disciplines are likely to encounter situations which are fraught with conflict, whether the issue is dealing with community opposition to the development of a new facility, developing environmental standards, allocating limited resources to meet emerging societal needs or dealing with the conflicting demands and expectations of different stakeholders. This course is designed to enable students to develop consensus-building strategies that produce agreements that everyone can live with. The course utilizes case materials and examples drawn from different disciplines. (Formerly IST 905.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: INP914 and SWP924
  • INT 906 - Sexuality: Power and Pleasure
    This survey course examines the societal basis of attitudes and behaviours related to human sexuality. Students will be introduced to research and theoretical concepts in the literature that contributes to our understanding of sexuality. Sexuality is recognized as a complex and multi-dimensional component of human identity and experience, mediated and influenced by social constructs of gender, race, ethnicity, disability, sexual orientation, age and socio-economic opportunities. The course promotes critical self and social consciousness through challenging sex-negative religious traditions, institutional regulation/control of sexuality, and gender socialization including patriarchal family structure. Some of the topics to be considered are sexuality across the life course; sexuality and liberation; intimacy, love and relationships; sex and gender role socialization; sex, violence and the law, sex as a commodity and AIDS and sexual behaviour. (Formerly IST 906.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 907 - Team Work for Community Services
    This course explores team practice in community services professions, as they transform practice to serve the needs of all stakeholders. The creation of new approaches to work with clients will be an outcome of the course. Theories of multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary team work will be presented. Different disciplinary perspectives will be respected and applied. Course methodology will allow the participants to model the theories and applications that form the core of the course. (Formerly IST 907.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 908 - Homelessness in Canadian Society
    This course offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the complex problem of homelessness. Drawing on literature from Canada and the U.S., issues which underlie homelessness, the various ways in which these may be manifested, the ever changing characteristics of these populations, and the policy responses aimed at resolving issues are explored. The current state of statistical information, the views of frontline service providers and advocates, and the differing paradigms embedded in the various disciplines represented will form the basis for debate and shared learning. (Formerly IST 908.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 910 - First Nations Issues
    Ogitchita Luwatilihunyunih (First Nations translation: strong helper's hands). This course offers students an interdisciplinary approach to address how to become an ally to Aboriginal peoples. Designed for community service students both from mainstream and Aboriginal backgrounds, this course applies an anti-oppression perspective to understand the origins of issues confronting contemporary Aboriginal peoples. To appreciate the process of Aboriginal self-determination, a holistic approach guides the examination of community services and infrastructure responsive to the needs of First Nations' communities. (Formerly IST 910.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 911 - International Community Development
    This course will introduce the student to the challenges of sustainable community development in the developing world. The course begins with a broad exploration of the meaning of development and under-development and its relevance to Asia, Latin America, Africa and the Middle East today. This course will also explore various approaches which have been used in local, bottom-up developments as well as some tools which are now available to assist the community development facilitator. (Formerly IST 911.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 912 - Community Development: International Field Experience
    This course provides an opportunity for students to deepen their understanding of development issues, and to experience part of their learning in an interdisciplinary, international, and intercultural setting. Following a brief in-class orientation at Ryerson, the field experience part of the course is held overseas. Canadian students will work with students from the host country on specific projects relevant to community development in that country. The country and projects selected may vary from year to year.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 913 - Issues of Migration
    This course examines the main concepts and issues in contemporary migration studies by employing historical and international perspectives. The course will examine the Canadian response and the evolution of a post-war system implemented to deal with refugees and immigrants. Case studies of immigrants to Canada and to other parts of the world are used to illustrate theoretical concepts and to promote an understanding of the contextual nature of contemporary migration processes. Comparisons with other societies such as Australia, the United States and to the European Union will be discussed. The course will use a critical social sciences approach to address the implications of the North-South, and South-South relationship in the creation of refugees and immigrant populations.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 914 - Settlement Experiences
    This course examines the settlement processes experienced by new immigrants and refugees. The course discusses the different forms of resettlement, receptions, repatriation, social capital and human capital. It will also discuss the theoretical approaches to citizenship, nationalism and multiculturalism. The course introduces the intersection of race, gender, class and citizenship. It reviews current debates regarding settlement policies and services provided to different classes of immigrants.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 915 - Responses to Migration
    The focus of the course will be on the determinants of responses to migrants and migration through an examination of topics including racism, the media, legal status, services available to newcomers, education and credential recognition, and issues of housing discrimination. The goals of this course are to familiarize students with factors known to contribute to negative or positive responses to migrants and migration. In addition students will learn to apply these factors to important practical issues in a critical and reflective manner such as understanding trends over time in migration attitudes and looking at present strategies that may be utilized to improve responses to migrants and migration.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 916 - Introduction to Fundraising
    This course provides a view of the Canadian voluntary sector and its organizations, as well as an introduction to concepts and issues related to the practice of fund development. This comprehensive overview also acts as a knowledge base for subsequent, in-depth study of the various aspects of fund development. The concept of philanthropy and various fund development approaches will be explored.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 917 - Interprof. Ed. for Community Development
    When citizens become involved in the development of their communities, the processes are distinct from state or private led development. Participatory and community-centered development requires planning, organizing and power sharing across community and professional groups. In this course, learners will be introduced to an Interprofessional Education (IPE) process for Community Development. In an IPE process, learners navigate varying professional and disciplinary perspectives, complexities of shared decision-making, implicit and explicit power dynamics and reflect on group process.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 920 - Community Collaborations
    This interdisciplinary course will assist students and practitioners in developing knowledge and skills required in multi-sectoral community collaborations. The course provides an overview of collaboration while reviewing common factors influencing success. Collaborative processes will be examined including: community engagement and mobilization, strategic planning and implementation, governance, leadership, communications, and evaluation. Examples of community collaborations, community hubs, community development projects and urban collectives that improve outcomes for children and youth through to older adults are explored.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 921 - Writing for Disability Activism
    This is an applied writing course: you will write and think critically about writing. This is also an interdisciplinary course which means you will work with other learners across a range of disciplines and learn from and about a range of disciplines. Starting with writing from within the disability movement, we will introduce you to writing as a form of expression, inquiry, resistance, solidarity, and survival. We will draw on readings and examples from different disciplines and explore how writing changes depending on the disciplinary context. We welcome experienced and novice writers. Students should be interested in writing and social change.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 922 - Intro to Aboriginal Worldviews
    An introduction to Aboriginal worldviews in Canada with reference to Aboriginal worldviews globally. Students will be introduced to Aboriginal perspectives, values and spirituality. It includes an exploration of what constitutes "valid" knowledge, how knowledge shapes identity and how it influences the lives of Aboriginal peoples today. The role of worldviews as the basis of social justice and transformative change with the message that Aboriginal/ Indigenous knowledges can be of value to all people of the world.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 923 - Canada's Story: An Aboriginal Perspective
    This course will explore the background of Aboriginal peoples from the time of creation, through the processes of colonization, its present impacts and resistance to such impacts. It will address the arms of colonization such as the Indian Act, residential school system, child welfare and education. Aboriginal peoples' survival, resistance and healing will also be a major component to this course.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 930 - Aging: From Cells to Society
    This course examines and critiques issues and concepts associated with aging and older adults from the individual/physiological and the social/structural perspective. Topics include the physical and cognitive changes with aging, along with issues related to diversity, social support, aging-in-place, leisure, work and retirement, healthcare and technology. Through interdisciplinary course discussions and analysis of case studies, students will develop their knowledge and build capacity to respond to the needs of an aging population.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 935 - Ethical/Legal Frameworks in Aging
    Demographic changes mean that most disciplines and professions will work with older adults. This course introduces students to key ethical and legal aspects of working with older adults and how to manage them. Topics include the rights of older adults, informed consent, advance care planning, mental capacity, dementia, disability, and caregiving. Students will develop their capacities for navigating legal and ethical challenges in practice and to support and safeguard the rights of older adults.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 940 - Mobilizing Research for Change

    Across disciplines and professions there is an emphasis on evidence-informed practice and policy. Through an introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods, this course develops students' skills for finding and critically analyzing research evidence to inform change. Students will identify a practice/policy issue of their own interests, find and appraise research evidence, and strategize to mobilize knowledge for change. Course discussions focus on aging and older adults, but the skills are transferable across disciplines.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 945 - Technology and Aging Populations

    This course investigates technology and aging. It examines the potential of technology to improve health and societal outcomes for aging populations. Course materials focus on technological innovation, design, access, and use patterns of older adults in relation to health and well-being, social inclusion, aging-in-place, caregiving, the workforce, leisure, and mobility. Students will mobilize theory and knowledge to analyze the potential of 21st century technologies to address challenges and further opportunities to support healthy aging and well-being.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • INT 950 - Practicum/Project in Gerontology
    This course is designed to mobilize students? theoretical and substantive knowledge in aging and gerontology through an applied project. Students will work in a placement or on a project of interest to them in the field of aging/gerontology to gain experience in working with older adults and to support current or future career goals. Learning is facilitated through a variety of teaching modes, including sustained contact with the course instructor.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required