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  • PHL 101 - Plato and the Roots of Western Philosophy
    An introduction to Philosophy, using Plato's Republic. Topics include: How ought we to live our lives? What is justice? What is the nature of society and the individual? What social arrangements (educational, political, economic) best serve the ideals of justice and happiness?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • PHL 110 - Philosophy of Religion I
    This course examines religion from a philosophical perspective. What is the nature of the "divine"? Can we give a rational account of religious experience? Can we prove the existence of God? Can the idea of God be reconciled with the presence of evil in the world? Is atheism a viable alternative to faith? These are just some of the questions this course explores. We will consider both western and eastern religions. PHL 110 is not available for credit to students who choose PHL 610.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: PHL 610
  • PHL 187 - Ancient Greek Philosophy
    This course explores major themes in Ancient Greek thought. The course covers some of the doctrines Plato and Aristotle developed to answer a wide range of questions, e.g., What is the good life for a human being? What is knowledge? How should we distinguish reality from appearances? What kinds of things exist? What is the soul? Is the soul immortal? In addition, we may examine the ideas of other philosophers of this period.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • PHL 201 - Problems in Philosophy

    This course serves as a problem-based introduction to philosophy. Enduring issues such as 'Do we have free will'?, 'What makes you the same person through time and change'?, 'Can we know whether God exists or not'?, and 'How are mind and body related'? will be explored. Development of student skills in the critical analysis and articulation of reasoning will be emphasized.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: PHC 180
  • PHL 210 - Introduction to Indian Philosophy

    This course provides an introduction to Indian philosophy, its history, major figures, schools, and development from Antiquity to the late classical period. These may include: Speculative Thought in the Vedic Corpus; Carvaka Materialism; Early Buddhist Thought; Jain thought; Samkhya-Yoga Philosophy; the Nyaya and Vaisesika Schools; Brahmanical Social Philosophy; Mahayana Buddhist Philosophy; and Classical Vedanta. Issues may include selfhood, suffering, the good life, metaphysics, and theory of knowledge.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • PHL 214 - Critical Thinking I
    A course designed to develop clarity of thought and method in the construction, analysis and evaluation of both unsupported claims and those supported by arguments. While there will be some exposure to the notion of logical form, the emphasis here is upon informal principles and arguments stated in ordinary language. Topics include the nature and methods of argument, classification and definition, along with some common fallacies and some questions about meaning and language. Restriction: Criminal Justice, Politics and Governance, Psychology, Sociology, Undeclared Arts. PHL 214 is not available for credit to students who choose SSH 105.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: SSH 105, PHC 182
    Custom Requisites: Not available to ACS, Criminology, English, Environmental and Urban Sustainability, Geography, History, GCM, Int'l Econ, Philosophy, Politics and Governance, Psychology, Sociology or Undeclared Arts students.
  • PHL 302 - Ethics and Health Care
    This course examines ethical issues arising in the delivery of health care at both the level of the practitioner/client relationship (confidentiality, informed consent, euthanasia, abortion) and at a broader social level (justice and resource allocation, new technologies, professionalization and power). The course will draw on: a) general philosophical analysis of central concepts (good, right, justice, person-hood, autonomy, authority, integrity, health); b) general theoretical perspectives (feminism, "the Biomedical model", Utilitarianism, deontology); and c) student professional education and clinical experience in nursing.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PHL 509
  • PHL 306 - Freedom, Equality, Limits of Authority
    In light of our moral concepts and theories, this course critically examines current controversies concerning individual freedom and responsibility, social equality, and the limits of governmental authority. Topics are drawn from issues like the following: censorship of hate literature, pornography, and advertising; prohibition of drugs, gambling, and prostitution; group-differentiated rights concerning aboriginal peoples, cultural sovereignty, affirmative action, and pay equity.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: PHC 181, PHL 181
  • PHL 307 - Business Ethics
    This course examines ethical issues and controversies concerning contemporary business practices and situates them within the broad intellectual framework of a free market society. Discussion will draw from such topics as: the concept of a market society, consumer sovereignty, utilitarian and contract models of business ethics, profit making and social responsibility, self-interest and altruism, the concept of business as a practice, mechanistic and organic conceptions of business, advertising, human rights, and conflicts of interest.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: ITM 407, ITM 734
  • PHL 333 - Philosophy of Human Nature
    This course examines philosophical writings about human nature. Topics may include: 1) What meanings are there for the word 'nature'? 2) How do we differentiate human nature from the nature of other sorts of beings? 3) What makes a response to a problem a human response? The course presumes that there are no unquestioned first principles, such as the existence of God, the inherent goodness of humans, or the objectivity of truth claims and values.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • PHL 334 - Ethics in Professional Life
    This course examines the many ways that organizations and professions institutionalize values, influence beliefs and attitudes, and guide conduct through prescriptions for professional practices and missions and mandates for organizations. The course focuses on prominent issues such as codes of ethics, conflict of interest, dirty hands, and whistle-blowing. Readings emphasize the complexities of virtue and moral agency for professionals and organizations, while comparing and contrasting selected established and emerging professions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ACS 105 or SSH 105 or any PHL course.
  • PHL 365 - Philosophy of Beauty
    This course examines classical and contemporary philosophical discussion of questions surrounding beauty and the aesthetic, such as: Can beauty be defined? Are judgements of beauty fundamentally subjective? Does beauty have value, or is it a harmful and oppressive notion? Are humans 'hard-wired' to pursue the beautiful?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • PHL 366 - Existentialism and Art and Culture
    Through literature, visual art, film, and theory, this course explores existentialist lines of thought and their implications for modern day life. Existentialism is a philosophical and cultural movement critical of social illusions and self-deceptions that thwart genuine freedom. Exploring experiences of anxiety, futility, and isolation, analyzing the nature of the individual's relation to society, morality and religion, and arguing for the irrational nature of reality, existentialist theorists and artists seek to promote freedom, creativity, authenticity.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • PHL 400 - Human Rights and Justice
    This course aims to provide the philosophical background and conceptual tools which would enable students to recognize and handle complex contemporary issues and conflicts involving human rights. Topics include: classic and contemporary theories of rights and justice; equity and affirmative action; children's rights; gender, sexual orientation and equality rights; aboriginal, language and cultural rights: human rights and cultural relativism. The course will combine lectures and discussion of selected philosophical readings and case studies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 401 - Philosophy and Mass Culture
    This course will explore the phenomenon of popular culture from various philosophical perspectives. Philosophers are divided in their assessment of the aesthetic and moral worth of mass culture. While some thinkers, like Walter Benjamin and, more recently, Noël Carroll, tend toward an optimistic appraisal, others, like Theodor Adorno, adopt a much more critical attitude. Popular culture as a whole will be examined, but special attention will be given to film, photography, and television.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 406 - Issues of Life, Death and Poverty
    In light of our moral concepts and theories, this course critically examines current controversies concerning the sanctity of life, the constraints on ending life, and our obligations to provide the conditions for an acceptable life. Topics are drawn from issues like the following: abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, genetic manipulation, war, torture, global poverty, famine relief, and basic welfare rights.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: PHC 181, PHL 181
  • PHL 420 - Philosophy, Diversity and Recognition
    Many are disadvantaged or disvalued because of aboriginality, race, ethnicity, sex, gender, orientation, or such. Usually, problems of marginalization are addressed in terms of equality, equity, and our legal constitution. Critics argue that this framework is insufficient to address the problems. They defend a different political morality variously referred to as the politics of recognition, identity, or difference. This course is a philosophical investigation of the different conceptual frameworks concerning the problems of marginalization.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ACS 403 or PHL 400 or PHL 501 or PHL 503 or PHL 505 or PHL 603
  • PHL 444 - Ethics in Health Services Management
    This course translates the principles, theories and practices of ethical decision making into information and applications which will be relevant to healthcare administration. The course builds on the recognition of the influences and factors that impact on health care managers' ethical decision making. Topics and issues which will be addressed in the course include: the role of market forces, integrated medicine, technology, and their impact on quality assurance programs.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 449 - Philosophy of Punishment
    What is the meaning of legal punishment? Why should we punish criminals (including natural and artificial persons, individuals and collectives)? In what ways should they be punished? How important is proportionality of punishment? How significant are expected consequences of punishment? This course critically examines developments in philosophical thinking about the conceptual foundations of punishment, focusing on theories of deterrence, retributivism, and restorative justice. Readings are comprised of classic and contemporary works by philosophers.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 500 - Philosophy of the Natural Environment
    The rise of environmental philosophy challenges the "anthropocentric paradigm" that has dominated Western thought. This course explores the implications of this challenge for our conception of ourselves, the basis for both human and natural values, and our obligations within the human and biotic communities. Topics include: traditional philosophical attitudes towards nature, obligations to future generations, "animal rights", individual versus holistic models of value in relation to ecosystems, species and wilderness, and conflicts between human and natural values.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 501 - Oppression and the Critique of Power
    This course focuses on the nature of oppression and on the work of those philosophers who have sought to uncover, understand, criticize and resist it. Topics may include: controversies in defining oppression; economic exploitation and the critique of capitalism; the politics of race and post-colonialism; the struggles of Indigenous nations and people; oppression on the basis of sex and/or gender; cultural forms of oppression; intersectional strategies of resistance.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 502 - Aristotle
    One of the pillars of ancient Greek philosophy, Aristotle produced seminal work in a wide range of fields including logic, epistemology, metaphysics, physics, cosmogony, biology, philosophy of mind and action, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. This course will critically examine selected themes and doctrines in Aristotle's writings, such as his positions on the nature of time, causation, divinity, the human soul, gender differences, the ideal state, and tragic drama.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 503 - Ancient and Modern Ethics
    This course explores seminal works in Western ethics. It analyzes different responses to such questions as: What kind of life is ultimately worth leading? What makes a person good? What makes an action right? Are there moral demands that bind everyone? If so, can we know what they are? Does morality have its foundations in religion? Reason? Emotion? Social practices? Contributions from such thinkers as Aristotle, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, and Mill will be studied.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 504 - Philosophy of Art
    The objective of this course is to provide students with an overview of a number of different theories concerning the nature of art. It will address such matters as the relationship between art and truth, the appropriate criteria of art criticism, the distinction between art and non-art, and the nature of aesthetic values.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 505 - Hegel and Marx
    Hegel and Marx were influential for introducing the notion that our lives only make sense when understood historically, in relation to our struggle with nature and with each other. We'll see that whereas Hegel saw this struggle as oriented towards greater self-knowledge and the freedom of the human spirit, Marx saw it in materialist terms, arguing that economic exploitation, and in particular capitalism, is the main obstacle to human freedom.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 506 - The Rationalists
    This course traces themes in the epistemology and metaphysics of leading thinkers of the rationalist movement of the 17th and 18th century. Rationalists thought reason alone could discover significant metaphysical principles and truths. This course examines their various answers to questions such as: What can we know about the world? What roles do reason and sensation play in knowledge? How is the mind related to the body? How are thought and perception related?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 708
  • PHL 507 - Ethics and Disability
    The life circumstances of disabled people are shaped by powerful ideological forces rooted in moral and political philosophy. This course introduces important intellectual traditions underpinning the human quest for justice. From this base, students 'test out' various ethical approaches, grappling with fundamental questions: How shall we be guided in approaching new reproductive technology, end-of-life decisions and asymmetrical relations of care? Are there limits to individual autonomy? How shall we distribute health care and social resources?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 508 - The Empiricists
    This course traces themes in the epistemology and metaphysics of influential philosophers of the empiricist movement of the 17th and 18th Centuries. Rejecting tenets of Rationalism and spurred by the success of the new empirical sciences, these thinkers sought to ground factual and metaphysical knowledge in sensory experience. Topics will include the nature and scope of knowledge, realism, idealism, naturalism, and skepticism. Other topics may include the nature of causation, personal identity, and free will.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 708
  • PHL 509 - Bioethics
    Recent advances in biomedical sciences have raised a host of ethical concerns involving the sanctity and quality of life, fairness, equality, and autonomy. New and revolutionary developments call for legislative reform and policies designed to keep research and its applications within appropriate boundaries. This course examines issues such as cloning, assisted reproduction, genetic screening, gene therapy, organ donation, and resource allocation within a framework of moral principles and contemporary debate. PHL 509 is not available for credit to students who choose PHL 302.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: PHL 302
    Custom Requisites: Not available to Nursing program students.
  • PHL 511 - Kant
    Immanuel Kant (1724-1804), sought to bridge the Enlightenment and the Rationalist movements. This course will focus on Kant's account of the mind as not being a blank slate, and its implications for human knowledge and self- understanding. Kant's distinctions between phenomena/noumena and analytic/synthetic profoundly influenced later thought in Europe, Britain, and North-America. Different texts and/or passages from Kant's works will be read at the discretion of the instructor.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 708
  • PHL 512 - Philosophy of the Emotions
    This course will ask "what are emotions?" and explore how answers to this question might challenge longstanding ideas about the nature of selfhood, what it means to be free, how we are ethically, existentially and ontologically related to others, how the mind is related to the body, how emotions are related to other feelings, beliefs, and desires, or to expressive acts, as well as to reason and how we acquire truths.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 513 - Phenomenology
    This course introduces students to the methods and central theses of phenomenology, one of the most important philosophical movements of the 20th Century. Some of the typical issues to be studied include: the distinction between reflective and lived experience, the nature of perception and embodied experience, the intersubjective construction of meaning, the breakdown of the subject/object dualism, and the temporal structure of human reality. Authors studied may include Husserl, Bergson, Heidegger, Sartre and Merleau-Ponty.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 708
  • PHL 514 - Mind and Agency
    This course will examine philosophical attempts to understand the nature of human agency. It will consider traditional accounts of freedom of the will, of the relations between theoretical and practical reason, of what it is to do something intentionally or on purpose, and of whether human freedom is possible in a physical world governed by deterministic natural laws. The readings may include both historical and contemporary works in both the analytic and continental traditions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 515 - Topics in Metaphysics and Epistemology
    This course will consider special topics concerning the nature of reality and our knowledge of it. Topics will vary, but may include: Realism and alternatives; skepticism; causation; causal accounts of knowledge; the possibility of truth in ethics; modal knowledge claims; reliabilism and justified true belief accounts of knowledge; new conceptions of experience. Readings may be drawn from both continental and analytic traditions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 516 - Foundations of Analytic Philosophy
    The development of formal logic at the turn of the 20th Century promoted a certain philosophical style and method known as 'analytic philosophy'. Its proponents sought greater clarity and rigour than they found in traditional metaphysics, and brought to philosophy a new focus on language. The course examines works by such major figures as Frege, Russell, G.E. Moore, Wittgenstein, and the logical positivists, as well as their critics.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 517 - Special Topics
    This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of a particular topic, concept, book or the work of particular author (whether historical or contemporary) that is not addressed in the same depth elsewhere in the Philosophy program. Course content will vary each time the course is offered, and will be posted the term prior to the course running.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 520 - Social and Political Philosophy
    What is power, and who really holds it in our society? Is a government's power over us legitimate, and what are its proper limits? Do modern liberal democracies really succeed in giving power to ordinary people? When is it right for citizens to rebel against the powers that be? Such questions and others will be addressed by way of a study of some of the classic works in social and political philosophy.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 521 - Personal Identity East and West

    Questions surrounding personal identity or the 'self' are central to the philosophical traditions of India and Tibet, the West, and contemporary cognitive scientists. A fruitful cross-cultural dialogue concerning the self, subjectivity, and consciousness is emerging. In this course, we examine some of the basic issues and debates through a close reading of a series of papers from leading philosophical scholars of India and Tibet as well as prominent Western philosophers of mind and phenomenologists.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 522 - Philosophy and Death
    Death and human mortality have been central philosophical topics since ancient times. This course deals with philosophical reflections about the nature of death and our knowledge of it. Questions to be considered may include: What is death? Are there reasons for thinking we have immortal souls? Would immortality be desirable? Are there reasons for thinking we could survive death? Is death a bad thing for the person who dies? Is it rational to fear death?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 525 - Environmental Ethics
    Do animals have rights? Should trees have standing? Do ecosystems have interests? What ethical obligations do present generations owe to future generations? How should distributive justice implications of environmental decision making be addressed? The course will discuss a variety of ethical perspectives on human-environment relationships, including distinctly environmental philosophies such as deep ecology, social ecology, and ecofeminism. Readings will discuss the applications of theories to local and global environmental problems.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 530 - Media Ethics
    This course examines the rights, freedoms, and obligations of the media and practising journalists. Issues may vary somewhat from year to year, but the following are typical: the grounds and limits of freedom of expression; moral responsibilities respecting truth, balance, and objectivity; media ethics and business pressures; obligations to the public, to the audience, to source, to colleagues, to the employer, and to oneself. The course includes case studies as well as regular discussion of ongoing media activity.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: CC 8969
  • PHL 544 - Feminist Philosophy
    Feminist philosophy engages in critical scrutiny of concepts of sex and gender, and critiques everyday social norms, practices and institutions, relying upon diverse and divergent ethical, political and social theories. This course may explore feminist perspectives on ethics, social and political theory, philosophy of science, epistemology and metaphysics. Concerns include: Are there gendered ways of knowing? How would a gendered analysis affect the understanding of alienation, discrimination, exploitation, oppression and subordination?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 550 - Knowledge, Truth and Belief
    Do we know anything? If so, what do we know, and how do we know it? What is the difference between knowledge and mere belief or opinion? How can we tell if our beliefs are justified? What makes some beliefs true, and others false? Epistemology - the study of knowledge - is the branch of philosophy concerned with such questions. This course explores these issues by examining some important contributions to the field, both historical and contemporary.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 551 - Metaphysics
    This course is an introduction to philosophical accounts of the fundamental structure and organization of reality. Questions to be considered may include: Why does the universe exist? What are space and time? Is the past as real as the present? Are future events fated to happen? How is change possible? Are there other universes besides the one we live in? Criticisms of philosophical attempts to answer these questions will also be discussed.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 552 - Philosophy of Science
    Science is a cornerstone of modern civilization, a method of inquiry with tremendous prestige and far-reaching effects. This course examines philosophical attempts to understand the fundamental nature of science. Topics may include: Is there a scientific method? Is science essentially rational? Does science reveal the truth about nature? What role do values play in science? Are there things that science cannot explain? Is science an expression of one particular culture, or is it somehow universal?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 597 - Introduction to Formal Logic
    This course is an introduction to propositional and predicate logic. We will study: the relationships between formal logical languages and ordinary languages like English; the relationship between validity in a system and logical validity; various methods for showing the validity and invalidity of patterns of inference. We will conclude with a brief introduction to some of the meta-logical concepts, such as soundness and completeness, that are the core of many more advanced studies in logic.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: SSH 105 or PHL 214
    Antirequisites: MTH 110
  • PHL 600 - Classic Readings in Analytic Philosophy
    This course will focus on a selection of some of the most influential writings in 20th century "analytic" philosophy by authors such as Frege, Russell, GE Moore, Ayer, Carnap Quine, Austin, Sellars, Rorty, David Lewis, Davidson, and Kripke.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 708
  • PHL 601 - Classic Readings Continental Philosophy
    This seminar provides students an opportunity for an in-depth study of a specific topic or figure in continental philosophy. Students will be required to write a major paper. Course content varies according to the instructor's research interests and expertise, but could include: philosophy of difference, biopolitics, religion and secularization, embodiment, dialectics, the nature of temporality and historicity, the role of the aesthetic, etc.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 708
  • PHL 602 - Health Policy: Ethics and Justice
    This course is concerned with implications of diverse theories of justice for the design and operation of health care. Topics covered may include: What might distinguish health care from other goods distributed by society? Who should have access to health care? What makes health care systems more or less fair? What are implications of social inequality for access to, and quality of, health care? How might health policy contribute to addressing problems of global injustice?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 603 - Modern and Contemporary Ethics
    This course explores modern and recent answers to ethical questions such as: What makes an action right? What makes a person good? Are there moral demands that bind everyone? If so, can we know what they are? Does morality have its foundations in reason? Emotion? Social practices? Contributions from such thinkers as Hegel and Bradley, Moore, Ross, Foot, Williams, Gilligan, and MacIntyre will be studied.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PHL 306 or PHL 406 or PHL 503 or PHL 612
  • PHL 605 - Existentialism
    For existentialists, freedom is not a given, but something to achieve. Reading authors like Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, Beauvoir and Heidegger, we'll ask what aspects of the human condition tend to thwart true freedom: Self-deception? Social norms or religious codes? Anxiety in confronting death? Longing for absolute justification for life's meaning? Alienation arising from an overestimation of reason or technology? We'll also consider what is required for authenticity, responsibility, freedom, and, possibly, the meaning of faith.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 606 - Philosophy of Love and Sex
    This course examines historical and contemporary philosophical perspectives on love and sex. Questions considered may include: What is romantic love? What are the relations between love, monogamy and marriage? Is adultery always morally wrong? What are the relations between love/sex and personal identity, gender and biology? What are sexual perversions? What is the moral status of prostitution and the commodification of sex? How should we define the concept of sexual harassment?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 607 - Contemporary Continental Philosophy
    This course explores some of the major figures and movements in contemporary continental philosophy, which can include developments in phenomenology, hermeneutics, structuralism, post-structuralism, French feminism, psychoanalytic theory, and critical theory. Topics covered may include the critique of scientific worldviews, technology and our place in the world, embodiment and subjectivity, religion and secularism, challenges to humanism, the dependence of truth on language and historical context, and possible limits of philosophy and conceptual thought.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 5 PHL courses
    Antirequisites: PHL 553
  • PHL 611 - Philosophy of Mind
    This course will examine, through both classical and contemporary texts, selected issues regarding human (and other) minds such as: How are mind and brain related? What is consciousness? Are thoughts prior to the acquisition of language? Can/could computers think? Do non-human animals think? Can the mind be 'naturalized' (understood as a product of evolution) or must it remain beyond our understanding?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 612 - Philosophy of Law
    What is law? What makes something a legal norm? Should citizens always obey the law? What is the relationship between law and morality? This course will examine diverse perspectives on law, such as natural law, legal positivism, feminist legal theory, and other critical theories. Themes to be covered include: equality, expressive, liberty and religious rights, as well as legal interpretation. There will be a focus on debates over the legal regulation of contested social practices.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 614 - Philosophy of Human Rights
    Are human rights universal? How are human rights negotiated across cultural differences? Have civil and political rights been privileged over social and economic rights? What happens when basic rights conflict? Themes covered may include the relationship of the individual to the state and the role of the media. This course critically examines the works of contemporary philosophers and their diverse accounts of human rights, and critiques including the perspectives of cultural relativism and feminist theory.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 621 - Non-Western Philosophy
    This course is an introduction to some major world religions and philosophies, systems which continue to inform the actions of cultures outside mainstream Euro-American tradition. Theoretical concerns can include such subjects as cultural relativism, differing cultural views on the nature of decisions and their justification, and the difficulties of adequately describing what is going on in a different cultural setting. More practical concerns can include such subjects as the problems of exporting political and economic systems across cultural boundaries, or of getting notions such as those of individual rights to make sense in a radically different conceptual milieu.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 622 - Classical Arabic Philosophy
    When Islam spread throughout a region spanning from Spain to India, Islamic culture absorbed and transformed a wide array of philosophical traditions, including Ancient Greek, Persian, and Indian thought. This course covers philosophers writing in Arabic from the 9th to the 12th c. CE, such as Al-Farabi, Avicenna, Al-Ghazali, Ibn Tufayl, Maimonides, and Averroës. Topics may include logic and semantics, conceptions of the soul, causation and creation, essence and existence, or political and social thought.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 639 - Medieval Philosophy
    The 'Middle Ages' are an underappreciated but important and diverse time in the history of philosophy in the Judaic, Christian and Islamic traditions. Our aim will be to give a general conversancy in medieval philosophy and its cultural context. This course will primarily focus on the Western, Latin tradition. It may focus on topics such as reason and faith, the problem of universals, the existence of God, or the relation between church and state.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 648 - Philosophy and Literature
    This course explores some of the rich points of intersection between philosophy and literature. Topics to be addressed may include: the relationship between literature and truth; questions concerning the nature and limits of literary interpretation and authorship; the relationship between literature, ethics, and politics; and whether literary writing can express aspects of reality or of human experience that cannot be captured in standard conceptual or analytic writing.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 661 - Marx, Nietzsche and Freud
    Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche and Sigmund Freud have been referred to as the 'masters of suspicion.' These late nineteenth and early twentieth-century thinkers examined the reasons that people fall prey to forms of mystification, and sought to lift the veil from our eyes so as to emancipate us from domination and repression. Some of the key topics to be examined include repression, alienation, commodity fetishism, revolution, nihilism, genealogy and the unconscious.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: one PHL course
  • PHL 700 - Meta-Philosophy
    The course will involve comparing and contrasting philosophical approaches, traditions, styles, and methods, from different periods and cultures, in order to isolate and understand the skills employed. This course will also explore how philosophical skills are applied in a variety of non-academic activities, professions and occupations. Guest lecturers who work outside the academic sector will explain and discuss how their philosophical skills helped them in their lives, and how they use them in their professions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of six PHL courses, including either PHL 503 or PHL 708
  • PHL 707 - Plato
    As the student of Socrates and the teacher of Aristotle, Plato is the founder of western philosophy as we know it. His dialogues cover a wide range of topics, including language, knowledge and self-knowledge, philosophy of mind, cosmology, metaphysics, ethics and virtue, politics, rhetoric, and education. This course will examine one such dialogue, or a selection from a few dialogues, in depth and detail.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 708 - Introduction to Modern Philosophy
    This course examines the foundations of contemporary conceptions of knowledge through a study of the two dominant philosophical traditions of the 17th and 18th centuries - Rationalism and Empiricism. The philosophers studied will include Descartes, Hume, and Kant. The themes examined may include the nature of knowledge, the origin and formation of beliefs about the external world, the threat of scepticism, theories of perception, contemporary relevance, and the relation between mind and body.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 709 - Religion, Science and Philosophy
    The physical sciences have contributed to philosophical debates regarding the apparent conflict between religious and scientific outlooks. In particular, religion and science seem to suggest different accounts of human nature, the universe, and our place in it. This course is concerned with issues such as: the basis for religious and scientific claims, nature and intelligent design, causality and free-will, and the emergence of mind.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 710 - Philosophy and Film
    This course examines the medium of film from several philosophical perspectives. Questions to be considered may include: What distinguishes film from other mass media and art forms? Do technical developments alter the definition of film? Is there a language of film? What can film teach us about the nature of perception? Does film contain an inherent gender bias? Has film created a captive audience, or is it the truly democratic art form?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 711 - Language, Meaning and Truth
    This course examines central topics regarding the nature of language, such as: What makes our utterances have the meanings they do? Is truth a social/cultural construction or in some way relative to one's social location? Does language have rules and, if so, what explains them? How does language influence our conception of the world? Do non-human animals have language? How and what do metaphors communicate?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 714 - Philosophy of Biology
    This course explores philosophical questions arising from the biological sciences. Topics may include: the status of biology as an empirical science, the existence of biological laws, the existence of design in nature, the nature of species, and the possibility of 'reducing' biology to physics. The course may also explore possible relations between evolutionary theory and human culture and ethics.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 718 - Advanced Topics in Ethics
    This course may investigate one or more figures, perspectives, or problems in historical or contemporary theoretical or applied ethics. Possible topics include the nature of practical reason and its relation to emotions and social life; the metaphysical status of moral values and/or the epistemological status of moral intuitions and judgments; or challenges to modern ethics from the revival of virtue ethics or the ethics of care, authenticity, or ambiguity.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 503
  • PHL 732 - Topics in Political Philosophy
    This course may investigate one or more major figures, historical periods or critical moments in political philosophy depending on the instructor's interests. Alternatively, it might explore (a) some perennial problem, e.g., the relation between reason and force, the constitution of the well-ordered society and citizen, limits on the use of force and the nature of freedom or (b) a particular theme, as in the scholarship confronting the Enlightenment project.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 752 - German Idealism
    Kant's revolutionary Transcendental Idealism provoked a remarkable new wave of philosophical activity in Germany in the late 18th and early 19th Centuries. Thinkers like Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel sought to advance, extend, and transcend Kant's idealistic conceptions of nature and subjectivity, and in doing so they each developed formidable and influential new philosophical systems of their own. This course focuses on the work of one or more of these post-Kantian Idealists.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of five PHL/CPHL courses, which must include PHL 708
  • PHL 757 - Major Figures in Western Philosophy
    This course provides a special opportunity for students to engage in an in-depth, sustained study of the work of one of the major thinkers of the Western philosophical tradition. Generally speaking, the figure chosen will be one whose work has not been the central focus of one of our other courses. Examples include Augustine, Descartes, Spinoza, Wittgenstein, Davidson, Derrida and Foucault.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 758 - Major Figures in Eastern Philosophy
    This course provides a special opportunity for students to engage in an in-depth, sustained study of the work of one of the major thinkers of in an Eastern philosophical tradition. Generally speaking, the figure chosen will be one whose work has not been the central focus of one of our other courses. These include Nagarjuna, Vasubandhu, Candrakirti, Vastyayana, Sankara, Tsongkhapa, Laotzu, Confucius, and Dogen.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: 6 PHL courses, one of which must be PHL 201 or PHL 521
  • PHL 802 - Project in Applied Philosophy
    Students will complete an independent project involving the application of the philosophical methods/conclusions they have learned in their program to a contemporary social issue or problem. In the seminar, students will plan and execute their project under the guidance of the instructor and in dialogue with other students. At the end of the course they will present their work in a public forum.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of five PHL courses
  • PHL 803 - Philosophy Engaging Communities
    Philosophical questions appeal to children, youth and adults from all walks of life. In this course, students will develop the skills and philosophical insights required for engaging communities beyond the university in philosophical learning. Students will learn by examining texts on the nature, means and ends of philosophical education; participating in workshops on facilitating philosophical learning; and engaging various communities (including at-risk children and youth ages 5-17, homeless youth, prisoners, and seniors) in philosophical discussion.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Minimum of five PHL courses
  • PHL 808 - Language and Philosophy
    This course will examine philosophical issues regarding both the nature of language and the relation of language to other matters. The first group includes topics such as: What distinguishes linguistic communication from other types of communication? How do metaphors work? In what ways is language rule-governed? The latter group might include: How are thought and language related? How is language related to gender? To personal identity? To rationality or reason?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PHL 810 - Philosophy of Cinema
    This course is a philosophical exploration of the art of cinema. It focuses on a range of auteurs (directors) and styles, as well as debates within film aesthetics. Topics may include the following: forms, genre theory, cinematic techniques, memory, world cinema, concern with modernity, visuality and temporality, reflexivity, criminality, and gender. Directors may include Murnau, Lang, Dreyer, Renoir, Kurosawa, Welles, Tarkovsky, Kiarostami, Haneke, and Breillat. Theorists may include: Arnheim, Bazin, Kracauer, Cavell, Rothman, and Carroll.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 900 - Senior Philosophy Seminar
    This senior seminar provides Philosophy and ACS (Philosophy Option) students the opportunity to develop advanced research, presentation and writing skills in a specialized field of Philosophy. Students will normally be required to write a major paper. Course content varies according to the instructor's research interests and expertise.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 910 - Senior Philosophy Seminar
    This senior seminar provides Philosophy and ACS (Philosophy Option) students the opportunity to develop advanced research, presentation and writing skills in a specialized field of Philosophy. Students will normally be required to write a major paper. Course content varies according to the instructor's research interests and expertise.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: a minimum of six PHL/CPHL courses
  • PHL 921 - Intellectual Property and Technology
    This course examines the multifaceted aspects of developments in intellectual property policy. Students will explore the diverse ethical norms, social practices, and legal doctrines which are used to both justify and to critique existing policies. The course will introduce students to the basic types of intellectual property rights - copyright, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets. It will survey various ethical theories or perspectives which are brought to bear on the topic.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PHL 922 - Religious Belief, Diversity, and Truth
    Contemporary society has been - and continues to be - formed in large measure by the religious commitments of individuals and institutions, both past and present. In this pluralistic age, how are we to understand the differences between the religious traditions of the world? What are we to do when the rights or interests of one religious group or individual conflict with those of another? This course explores the many philosophical issues surrounding religious diversity.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PHL 110 or PHL 709
  • PHL 923 - Philosophy of Religion II
    This course offers students an opportunity for advanced study of what philosophers have had to say about religion. Readings will be drawn from influential historical philosophers, and from contemporary philosophers. Some topics will pertain to theistic religions, some to non-theistic religions, and others to both. Topics may include: religious language; ethics and the meaning of life; the concept of the Sacred; the relationship between religious beliefs and evidence; and puzzles about the characteristics of God.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PHL 110 or PHL 709
  • PHL 924 - Critical Thinking II
    This course cultivates the critical thinking skills acquired in introductory critical thinking: clarity of thought, reasoning systematically, and the construction, analysis and evaluation of claims and arguments. The course will examine fundamental principles and standards governing good reasoning, as well as their application to specific philosophical issues. Topics will include deductive arguments and logical form, inductive and causal arguments, and some of the ensuing philosophical controversies and paradoxes, such as Hume's problem of induction.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PHL 214 or SSH 105 or ACS 105
  • PHL 950 - Directed Research Course
    This course offers senior students the opportunity for advanced and independent study with a member of the Philosophy Department. Topics are determined jointly by the student and the professor.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: Students must have completed at least 25 courses before taking PHL 950, at least 6 of which must be PHL courses, and have a CGPA of at least 3.33