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  • POG 100 - People, Power and Politics
    This course provides a critical introduction to the main themes in the study of politics, including state-building, nationalism, ideology, democracy, participation, development, security and globalization. We focus on the interrelated struggle for power and justice that lies at the heart of politics, raising questions crucial to informed, engaged citizenship: How do we define the "common good?" Who should wield power and why? How should power be shared? How should we resist the misuse of power?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • POG 110 - Power and Influence in Canadian Politics

    This course offers an introduction to the processes that underpin Canadian politics and democracy. Against a backdrop of civic participation, the course focuses on the central components of Canadian politics: voting, elections, parties, the media, and interest groups. Topics may include consideration of Indigenous peoples, French-English relations, political culture, regionalism, gender, sexual and ethnic diversity in Canada's political process. (Canadian)

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POC 180 and POL 102 and PPA 120
  • POG 210 - Power and Authority in Canada

    This course introduces the political institutions underpinning Canadian politics and democracy. It examines political decision-making with an emphasis on the Constitution, the Charter, the Prime Minister and Cabinet, the Legislature and the courts. Throughout, it assesses the location and exercise of power in Canada's political process. An understanding of political institutions is required to evaluate the health of Canadian democracy, and is necessary for a career in, or interacting with, government. (Canadian)

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 110 or POL 102
    Antirequisites: POC 180, POL 27A/B, POL 101, POL 220, POL 332, PPA 120
  • POG 214 - Controversial Policy Topics
    Controversy over policy decisions, outputs and outcomes is inherent to politics. This course will examine a selection of current controversial topics such as gambling, the sex worker trade and the regulation of distracted driving in order to understand the dynamics of policy controversy, positioning and power. What lies behind our political differences and what might this mean for our future? (Policy)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 100 or PPA 102 or PPA 120 or POL 102
    Antirequisites: PPA 211
  • POG 225 - Global Governance
    This course will introduce students to the emerging institutions and practices of global governance, how they are reconfiguring the relative powers and sovereignty of nation states and how they are being contested by critical social movements. These institutions and practices include: the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank (WB), World Trade Organization (WTO), free trade agreements, and the US-led war against terrorism. The course will focus on political and economic restructuring in the post-Cold War period but will situate contemporary developments against the history of the post WWII period and its modes of global governance. (Global)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 100 or POL 27B or (POL 101 and POL 102)
    Antirequisites: POL 208
  • POG 230 - Statistics and Social Science
    The course introduces students to the methods needed to describe and analyze political and social phenomena and events using quantitative data. Students will learn about the process of carrying out research and gain the tools to tell good research and data from bad. The examples used come from contemporary politics and society in Canada and the rest of the world, covering topics like voting, poverty, discrimination, war and others.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Lab: 2 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PPA 333
  • POG 235 - Western Political Thought
    The central consideration of politics is the attainment of the "good society." The history of Western political thought can be seen as an ongoing contestation of what we mean by the "good society" and what kind of political and social institutions are required for its realization. This course charts the history and contemporary relevance of these debates with a special focus on the idea of democracy from the ancient to the modern world. (Theory) (Formerly POG 330.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 100
  • POG 240 - Intro to Comparative Politics
    Using the comparative method, this course offers insights into some of the central questions in the study of politics: Why do countries democratize? What explains differences in the institutions of government? Do these differences matter? What is the relationship between democracy and economic development? These questions will be explored by examining politics in a range of countries both developed and developing. The course is organized around important themes, not particular countries. (Comparative)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 100
  • POG 310 - Provincial Politics
    Much of the political action in the Canadian political system occurs at the provincial level, where many important issues confronting citizens such as health care and education are addressed, yet most Canadians know little about their provincial governments. This course examines the main elements of provincial governance in a comparative context. Looking at ideological, economic, social and political factors, the course follows a critical and explanatory approach to understanding and evaluating provincial governance. (Canadian)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 210 or POL 101 or PPA 122 or POL 123 or PPA 120
    Antirequisites: PPA 121
  • POG 313 - The Politics of Race and Ethnicity
    Race and Ethnicity in Canada explores theories of race and related systems and practices of ethnicity, gender and multiculturalism and their impact on politics in Canada. The course is premised on the understanding that racial classifications are objective structures determining access to resources, opportunity and power in the Canadian political economy. The course also explores responses to racism by the Canadian state, key institutions and minority groups in efforts to address racism, including race relations, anti-racism and Canada's multiculturalism policy. (Canadian)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 210 or POG 320 or POL 27B or (POL 101 and POL 102) or POL 332 or PPA 120
  • POG 315 - Equity and Human Rights in Canada
    This course encourages students to think critically about what public policies might advance "human" rights. It examines the development of human rights thinking in Canada as reflected in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Canada Human Rights Act, provincial codes, landmark Supreme Court rulings relating to Aboriginal peoples, disability, race, religion, gender and sexual orientation, and internationally, in United Nations conventions, covenants and declarations. Students are encouraged to situate an understanding of human rights issues within a broader social, political and economic framework. (Canadian). Formerly PPA 521
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PPA 125
  • POG 316 - Social Policy
    This course examines the politics of social policy in Canada. Beginning with an exploration of the origin and purpose of social policy, it then identifies and traces the actors and institutions that get a seat at the social policy table. Using examples that draw from a range of social policy fields including health and income support, this course will also offer comparative studies of social policy in relevant provincial and national jurisdictions. (Policy)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 214 or POG 314 or PPA 211 or PPA 623
    Antirequisites: POL 220
  • POG 317 - Education Politics and Policy
    This course examines the influence of politics and policy in the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education sectors. While emphasis will be on Ontario's educational system, comparisons to other provincial and national educational systems will be included. We will explore selected educational reforms from an array of political, economic, and social perspectives. Topics to be presented in this course include the following: diversity, leadership, social justice, equity issue, multiculturalism, and the changing role of educators. (Policy)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 210 or POL 27B or (POL101 and POL 102) or POL 220 or POL 332 or PPA 120 or PPA 211 or PPA 623
  • POG 320 - Social Identity and Citizenship
    Despite the historical expansion of formal citizenship to previously excluded groups, several groups have found that social inequality, marginalization and exclusion have limited national belonging, rights and political participation. This course explores these various experiences thorough a theoretical focus on class, gender, race, immigrant, sexual, differently-abled, and Indigenous identities.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 100 or (POL 101 and POL 102)
  • POG 323 - The Politics of International Development
    'Development' is commonly the framework through which countries of the south are understood, and incorporated into the world capitalist system. This course traces the historical and theoretical evolution of and resistance to the developmental project from post-colonialism to neoliberalism. The course also investigates the complexities of the politics of 'development' by examining the 'south' in the north; and by tackling the politics of the rise of China, India and Brazil in the global economy.(Global)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 225 or POL 208 or POL 540
    Antirequisites: ACS 402
  • POG 324 - Global Political Economy
    The study of global political economy involves theoretical debate surrounding the nature and growing complexity of political and economic power relations among actors including states and international organizations: non-governmental, multi-national corporations, World Trade Organization, and international financial institutions. Major theoretical perspectives (political realism, liberalism, constructivism, Marxism and critical theory) are introduced and critically reviewed.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 225 or POL 208 or ACS 402
  • POG 410 - Canadian Urban Politics
    This course provides a critical examination of politics in Canadian cities and the regions that surround them. It explores how city-regions cope with, such forces as physical, economic, and population growth; diversity; globalization; and provincially-mandated restructuring. Central themes include municipal institutions, their development and their operation, and the ways in which key interests interact within urban and suburban areas. (Canadian)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 210 or POL 27B or (POL 101 and POL 102) or POL 332 or PPA 120
    Antirequisites: POL 122, POL 123, POL 222, PPA 122
  • POG 411 - Canadian Foreign Policy
    This course examines critically the politics of Canadian foreign policy. It will assess how much power and influence Canada has internationally; how much influence the world has on Canadian foreign affairs; and the factors shaping Canada's international policy choices. In considering these subjects, domestic and international institutions, structures, constraints, and influences will be examined. Potential policy issues to be addressed are: human security; the military; economic relations; human rights; peacekeeping/peacemaking; diplomacy; and development assistance. (Policy)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 214 or POG 314 or PPA 211 or PPA 623
  • POG 412 - Government and the Economy
    This course examines how governments set agendas, formulate, implement, and evaluate key economic policies. It focuses on the process and politics that are shaping policy in Canada, the United States, Mexico, and the European Union. The course will mainly consider continuity and reversals in fiscal, monetary, competition, industrial, and other policy areas within the context of economic globalization. (Policy)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 214 or POG 314 or PPA 211 or PPA 623
  • POG 415 - Environmental Politics and Policy
    Through an examination of various environmental issues, this course provides an introduction to environmental politics and policy. It examines how cultural values, environmentalism as a social and political movement, levels of development, science, political institutions and economics shape environmental politics in Canada and other parts of the world. An important theme in the course is the challenge of environmental governance given the complexity, scale and equity dimensions of environmental problems. (Policy)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 214 or POG 314 or POL 377 or PPA 211 or PPA 623
  • POG 416 - The Politics of Canadian Federalism
    The decision to create two levels of government in Canada, in other words, a federal system of government, continues to shape Canadian politics to this day. This course explores Canadian federalism as it reflects and refracts a diverse set of communities (regional, linguistic, economic, political, social and ethnic) and attempts to find a balance between unity and diversity in a coherent and workable set of relationships and public policies. (Canadian)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 210 or POL 27B or (POL 101 and POL 102) or POL 332 or PPA 120
    Antirequisites: PPA 425 and PPA 650
  • POG 417 - Canadian-American Relations
    This course provides a comparative analysis of US and Canadian politics and of international relations between the two countries. To this end, it explores the comparative history and political cultures of the two countries; the institutions of their respective political systems; elections, political parties and voting; regionalism; federalism; public policies; and specific Canadian-American issues like free trade, climate change, national security and the war against terrorism, Arctic sovereignty and other current topics. (Canadian)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 210 or (POL 101 and POL 102) or POL 27B or POL 332 or PPA 120
  • POG 423 - Nationalism and Identity
    Nationalism and identity are critically examined in historical and contemporary perspectives. Historically, the concern is with the emergence of nation-states in Europe and the impact of colonialism on national identity formation. Focus of the current context is on proliferation of ethnic and national conflicts in Asia and Africa, and Indigenous dispossession in the Americas. These issues as well as identity politics and diaspora identities in the West are assessed through feminist, anti-racist, and anti-colonial outlooks. (Theory)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 225 or POL 208
  • POG 424 - Human Rights and Global Politics
    Should universal human rights be considered a global norm? Or should concerns of national sovereignty and cultural pluralism take precedence? Discourses of human rights are powerful and ubiquitous and are used in many varied and complex ways in the contemporary world. This course will examine the historical emergence of human rights discourses in the West, their institutionalization, and their deployment in the contexts of the Cold War and the war on terror. A range of theories, critiques, and contemporary debates about human rights will be explored. (Global)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 225 or POG 315 or POL 208 or POL 540 or PPA 125
  • POG 425 - Regional Economic and Political Integration
    This course will examine the uneven development of regional economic integration efforts in the Americas, Asia, Africa, and Europe within the context of a relationship between globalization and regionalization. It will analyze the relationship between regional institutions (such as NAFTA, EU, CARICOM and ASEAN) and international economic institutions (such as IMF and WTO). Finally the course will assess the economic, social and political implications of processes of regional integration for nation-states and their citizens. (Global)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 225 or POL 208
  • POG 426 - Global Conflict and Peace
    This course explores the sources, effects and proposed resolutions of contemporary political conflicts. It examines typologies of conflict and violence, different explanations of current conflicts, the impact of globalization on the nature of political violence, and attempts (successful or otherwise) at conflict resolution. It complements this theoretical discussion with a detailed analysis of several studies of contemporary conflict drawn from various parts of the world: Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe or the Americas. (Global)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 225 or POL 208 or POL 540
  • POG 427 - Women, War, and Peace
    This course examines the gendered dimensions of international security, focusing on the roles and experiences of women in armed conflict, terrorism, and in peace movements. With this emphasis, it will examine peace-building and attempts to regulate conflict at the local, regional, and international levels, including the recent landmark United Nations Security Council resolutions and the resulting Women, Peace, and Security agenda. (Global)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: ACS 402 or POG 225 or POL 208 or POL 540
  • POG 430 - Contemporary Political Thought
    This course introduces students to theoretical perspectives within contemporary political thought. A central concern will be how each of the great modern traditions of Western political thought - Liberalism, Conservatism and Marxism - adapted to changing conditions in the second half of the twentieth century and beyond. In dialogue with these traditions, we will also examine new visions and revisions advanced by advocates of communitarianism, feminism, ecologism and environmentalism, post-modernism, multi-culturalism, post-colonialism and anti-capitalism. (Theory)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 235
  • POG 431 - Power, Domination and Resistance
    From Machiavelli's reflections on how a ruler might maintain power, to those of revolutionaries concerned with overthrowing it, political thinkers have long grappled with the nature of power, and resistance to it. This course engages with the work of liberal, Marxist, anti-colonial, post-structural, feminist and anti-racist theorists to reflect upon these questions in the context of contemporary politics. (Theory)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 235 or POL 208
  • POG 440 - Indigenous Governance/Justice
    This course examines the social, political and historical context of Aboriginal peoples in Canada: their experiences of assimilation and autonomy; ongoing relations with the Canadian state; efforts toward self-government; treaty rights and land claims; contemporary issues of identity and self-actualization; and the Aboriginal relationship with the Canadian criminal justice system. (Comparative)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: (POG 110 and POG 210) or POG 240 or POL 27B or (POL 101 and POL 102)
    Antirequisites: CRM 400 and PPA124
  • POG 442 - Women and Comparative Politics
    How much political power do women have around the world? This course explores the question of women's access to political power in a comparative context with Canada. In the course we will consider questions of representation and gender equality in both formal (i.e., political parties, legislatures, electoral systems) and informal (social movements, family) settings where politics occurs. Complicating factors such as race, religion, immigrant status, Aboriginal status, and sexual orientation will also be considered. (Comparative)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 240
    Antirequisites: POL 501
  • POG 443 - Global Cities
    Developments in the 20th century pushed some issues beyond the reach of national governments while simultaneously challenging urban areas to address such matters as deindustrialization and the emergence of "world cities;" immigration, migration and multiculturalism; and urban ecology - while also providing efficient and democratic urban governance. Are cities up to the task? This course takes the measure of some modern challenges, examines their roots, and explores various urban responses. (Comparative)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 225 or POG 240 or POL 540 or PPA 211 or POL 208 or POG 235
  • POG 444 - Politics, Media and Technology
    The mass media has transformed how societies communicate about, and perceive, political ideas. This course examines the interplay of media, technology and politics, discussing such topics as the relationship between print and the rise of modern democracy; the impacts of television on contemporary politics, especially election campaigns; and the emerging political influences of the Internet and social media. The course will also analyze the structure of ownership of global media systems and its impact on international communications. (Comparative)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 240
  • POG 446 - Voters, Elections, and Parties
    Representative democracy is virtually unthinkable without voters, elections and political parties. Citizens' decisions are aggregated at elections; electoral systems translate these decisions into legislative seats. Competition between parties in electoral, parliamentary and governing arenas generates much of the business and high drama at the heart of representative politics. This course focuses on how voters make decisions; how those decisions are translated into seats; and how political parties interact with voters and with each other to produce public policy. Before enrolling in this course, successful completion of an introductory statistics course is strongly recommended. (Comparative)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 240
  • POG 490 - Politics and Governance Topics
    This course will explore selected topics chosen by the instructor through applied and theoretical reading, class discussion, and presentations from guests who are experienced practitioners at all levels of government. The themes will vary according to the instructor, but will focus on particular challenges in politics and governance. Please consult the department website for more detail.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 210 and POG 214 and POG 225 and POG 235 and POG 240
  • POG 498 - Directed Research in Politics
    This course offers students the opportunity for advanced, independent study with a professor. Topics are determined jointly by the student and professor and must focus on politics and governance. Normally, students should have completed at least 30 credits before taking POG 498 and have a CGPA of no less than 3.0. Students must submit a completed application form to the Department at least 20 business days before the start of the relevant semester. Departmental and program consent required.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • POG 499 - Field Experience
    This course is intended for students who seek to combine relevant paid or unpaid field experience with their academic course work. With prior approval (which must be obtained one semester in advance), it may be used in connection with internships or work at agencies or other appropriate businesses and organizations - in Canada and abroad - or for research and/or experience related to politics and governance. In all cases the project will involve a writing component. Students who have successfully completed POG 210 or POG 225 will be considered for enrolment.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • POL 101 - Canadian Political Institutions
    An understanding of the Canadian political institutions is especially important for those planning a career in Social Work. In particular, the course examines human rights from the perspective of the Constitution and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms; the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of government, and the civil service. Central concepts include democracy, representation, and active citizenship. (Formerly POL 27A) (POL 101 and POL 102 are equivalent to POL 27A/B).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POC 180, POG 210, PPA 120
  • POL 102 - Political Processes in Canada
    An understanding of Canadian government is especially important for those planning a career in Social Work. In particular, the course introduces the central components of the political process, including political parties, elections, the media and polling, and pressure/interest groups. Contemporary issues in Canadian politics such as gender, race, region, and Aboriginality will also be discussed. (Formerly POL 27B) (POL 101 and 102 are equivalent to POL 27A/B).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POC 180, POG 110, PPA 120
  • POL 106 - The Politics of Human Needs
    The central consideration of politics in general is the attainment of the 'good society'. Examining how fundamental human values shape the political institutions that we create, this course adopts a 'human needs approach' to politics. Identifying the basic needs of humans, the course investigates how well or poorly countries are able to provide for those human needs. It compares and contrasts the varying approaches to wealth creation and wealth distribution currently populating the world system.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • POL 123 - Urban Government in Canada
    This course examines critically the structure, function, and politics of municipal governments in Canada's large urban centres in relation to the profession and practice of urban and regional planning. Topics discussed include the relationship between municipalities and other levels of government; local finance; local democracy; political and administrative structures; and historic, present, and future pressures for reform.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1 hr.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POG 410, POL 122, PPA 122
  • POL 128 - Politics and Film
    Films often mirror society in both intentional and unintentional ways. Some are overtly political, some reflect changing values and some are made purely for entertainment. This course will reflect on the various political perspectives which enable students to critically assess films. It will assess the role films play in reinforcing or debunking stereotypes. These themes will be examined in the context of the film industry in Canada and internationally.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • POL 129 - Immigration and Settlement in Canada
    Canada is often described as a country of immigrants. By examining Canada's immigrant tradition, this course introduces students to a number of distinctive characteristics of Canada as a political community. Topics and themes include: changes in Canadian immigration policies; immigration and Canadian identity; how global migration is transforming modern politics; and the nature of human rights in an age of migration. Is Canada becoming a uniquely multicultural political community?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • POL 203 - Politics of the Environment
    What can humans do to reverse the environmental problems they have created? What political actions are required? This course surveys the social, cultural, economic and political reasons for global and local environmental problems. Emphasis is placed on different political contexts, approaches and solutions to environmental problems in the North and South. Case studies and audio-visuals are used.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
  • POL 208 - Globalization and World Politics
    This course examines political conflict and instability in world politics. What are the political consequences of globalization? Why is nationalism and ethnic intolerance on the rise? What explains the eruption of political unrest and war? These issues are explored through current examples of political upheaval around the world. (POL 208 is not available for credit to students who choose POG 225.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: POG 225
    Custom Requisites: Restriction: Not available to International Economics and Finance students
  • POL 377 - Urban Sustainability Policy
    This course examines how the goal of urban sustainability is translated into policies and programs. The course focuses on how policy choices are made and the social, economic, political and environmental factors that influence what governments do and do not do to achieve sustainability. Students will understand the context, theory and practice of urban policy and policymaking in relation to the goal of urban sustainability and develop a critical understanding of government decision-making.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • POL 501 - Women, Power and Politics

    What is the relationship between women, power and politics in our contemporary society? How are women influencing the output of our political systems, particularly the policies that affect the lives of women and children? This course examines the political, cultural and social factors that affect women's participation in decision making, and asks if the representation gained to date has made a difference and, if so, where do we go from here?

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: POG 442
  • POL 507 - Power, Change and Technology
    How does technology shape society? How does it shape us? On what basis are decisions made in a technological society? What type of future will modern technology create? Who is in control? This course will examine these questions and the impact of technology on cultural, economic and political life in modern society. The political implications of future developments in reproductive and biotechnologies, global communications, automation, etc. will be evaluated.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 510 - The Politics of Sexual Diversity
    This course begins with an examination of homosexuality and heterosexuality as social constructs; examines the politicisation of sexual diversity and identity; and explores the place of diverse sexual identities in heterosexist society. Particular attention will be given to the way in which selected public policies (some Canadian; some in other jurisdictions) are influenced (or not) by recognition of sexual minorities. (POL 510 is not available for credit to students who choose SWP 910.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Antirequisites: SWP 910
  • POL 511 - Well-being and Opportunity in Canada
    Canadians are experiencing major changes in individual well-being and opportunity. A changing job market and growing differences in income combined with dramatic increases in university, tuition, decreases in benefits from income support programs and greater reliance on for-profit health care services have altered Canadians' ability to secure their futures. This course examines the rise and decline of the welfare state: how and why these changes in well-being and opportunity are taking place.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Custom Requisites: Not available to students in Social Work
  • POL 540 - Issues in Third World Politics
    This course examines the 'Third World' and the structures of domination from colonization to the contemporary neoliberal order. The focus is on issues of global inequality, gender, ethnic, racial and religious inequality, human security, development and democracy, and the interventions of global and regional institutions. The course will also examine whether social and political movements in the Middle East, Asia, Latin America and Africa offer hopes to advance struggles for democracy and global justice.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 588 - Neoliberalism and its Alternatives
    This course addresses the key theoretical elements in neo-liberalism, the dominant ideology directing local, national and global events today. From a critical analytical standpoint, we examine the key features of neoliberalism and how it influences political and economic decisions and generates new forms of governance in the early 21st century. The course explores some of the critiques of neoliberalism and alternatives to this ideology and forms of governance offered by its critics.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 601 - Social Movements and Politics
    This course will examine social movements that effect political change, their historical roots, their international dimensions, and the ways in which they fit within the social movement literature. Students will be introduced to the major approaches and debates in the academic study of social movements. Emphasis will be placed on understanding social movements historically and in context, especially in view of developments in political economy, expansions/contractions in popular democracy, and the impact of information technologies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 607 - Politics of Technology and Globalization
    This course examines the role of technology within a global context. What will it mean to be part of a global audience, work in a global factory, shop in a global supermarket, be governed by a world government? Can technology help to solve problems of environmental depletion and pollution? What role does technology play in escalating militarism around the world? Can technology reduce the gap between the rich and the poor within nations and between nations?
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 609 - Global Justice
    The study of justice is concerned not only with what is 'just' and whether we can agree on this matter across cultures, but also with what obligations we might have to treat each other fairly. In this course, students will examine questions of justice, as they have been extended to the global sphere, in light of contemporary concerns such as intensifying inequality, continued poverty, accelerated migration, anthropogenic climate change, and demands for righting historical wrongs.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 613 - International Law for Human Protection
    This course examines the evolution of international law relating to human protection. It traces the evolution of international law from governing relationships between countries to laws protecting and empowering humans. International human rights law, the law of war, humanitarian law, and criminal law are central to this global transformation. The course examines whether this global legal transformation has been effective. A number of international justice institutions are examined.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 620 - Sports and Politics
    How does sport reflect major social, economic, and political changes? How have scholars used sporting events as well as athlete performance data to test and advance theories from the social sciences? In this course we will look at both of these questions by examining society and politics through the lens of sports, on the one hand, and using sports data to test theories from political science, psychology and economics, on the other.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 688 - Colonialism and Imperialism
    Colonialism and imperialism have affected the lives of peoples for centuries and their impact continues to shape the political, economic and cultural life of contemporary communities in Africa, Asia and the Americas. Foundational to this course are issues of dispossession, identity, power and resistance in colonial and post-colonial societies and contemporary imperialism. Course readings and case studies compare and contrast experiences in selected countries from Asia, Africa and the Americas.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • POL 720 - Canada in the Continent
    "Living next to you," Pierre Trudeau once told an American audience, "is like sleeping with an elephant; no matter how friendly and even-tempered is the beast, one is affected by every twitch and grunt." This course evaluates: the cultural, political, economic and ideological twitches and grunts in the Canada-US relationship; what it means to sleep with an elephant; being Canadian in the presence of so large a continental "partner;" and the emerging role of Mexico.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PPA 101 - Cdn Public Administration I: Institutions
    This course looks at contemporary public administration in democratic society. It is examined in light of alternative methods of organization, including that of the private sector, as well as our fundamental requisites for democracy, such as the rule of law. It also examines the role of the machinery of government in maintaining the public system of administration as it undergoes contemporary attempts to restructure the role of the state under the ongoing demands of its leaders and citizenry. (Formerly PPA 322).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PPA 102 - Cdn Public Administration II: Processes
    This course introduces the process of leading and managing the public sector in Canada with an emphasis on the problems of political and administrative accountability. Students are introduced to the structure and process of policy formulation, implementation and evaluation; as well as to topics in intergovernmental relations; and the impact of public-private partnerships. The prime foci are the budgetary process, issues in personnel management and the drive for economies and efficiencies; government regulation, and e-government. (Formerly PPA 422.)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 101 or PPA 322
  • PPA 120 - Canadian Politics and Government
    In analyzing Canada's federal political system, this course assesses the ideas, interests and institutions that help define the limits of both state and societal power. It will provide students with a clear understanding of the workings of the system of governance guiding their everyday lives as citizens and as professionals. Topics include political culture and ideas; the social and economic context; and the constitutional and institutional mechanisms of governance. (Formerly POL 302, POL332)
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POC 180, POG 110, POG 210, POL 101, POL 102
  • PPA 121 - Ontario Politics and Government
    The Government of Ontario plays a central role in the lives of Ontarians, taking responsibility for such things as health, education, transportation, and municipal governments. It is also a major player in the economies of the province and the country. This course examines the structure and operation of the Ontario government, as well as the ideological, economic, social, and political forces at work in the making and operating of the government.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POG 310 (formerly PPA 522)
  • PPA 122 - Local Politics and Government
    This course examines the structures that influence local government decision-making. A significant amount of the material will draw from the Greater Toronto Area (GTA); however, relevant examples from other jurisdictions within Canada will be discussed. Weekly topics include: the history of local/municipal government, democracy versus efficiency, urbanization, political and administrative structures, finance, sustainable cities, and the role of major stakeholders such as business, labour, and citizens groups in the municipal arena.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POL 123, POG 410
  • PPA 124 - Indigenous Politics and Governance
    This course examines the social, political, legal, and historical context of Indigenous peoples in Canada and their political mobilization. Through an exploration of key challenges, flash points, and current issues, the course will foster a better understanding of Indigenous efforts around self-government, nation-building, recognition/implementation of Aboriginal and treaty rights, land claims, and the socio-economic gap that disadvantages Indigenous peoples in Canada.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: CRM 400 and POG 440
  • PPA 125 - Rights, Equity and the State
    This course provides a critical examination of how the State manages the issue of human rights. It explores the development of human rights through the Charter of Rights and Freedoms; the Canada Human Rights Act; provincial codes; landmark judicial rulings; and the impact of United Nations conventions, covenants and declarations on Canadian state practices. Students are encouraged to situate an understanding of human rights issues within a broader social, political, economic and public administration framework.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: POG 315
  • PPA 211 - Public Policy
    This course offers both a thematic and a practical introduction to the Canadian public policy-making process, beginning with the context in which ideas, institutions and interests inform public policy. With the use of a variety of contemporary social, economic and environment policy cases, the course examines the process by which public policy is formulated, implemented and evaluated - including its success rate. Lastly, the changing nature of, and contemporary challenges to, policy making are explored. (Formerly PPA 623).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 120 or POL 102 or POG 210 or COPA 103
    Antirequisites: POG 214
  • PPA 235 - Theories of the State
    This course examines major theoretical perspectives on modern industrial states, including pluralism, neoliberalism, Marxism and feminism. An effort is made to relate each perspective to relevant political issues of the day. In the final section of the course a number of thematic issues are considered from the perspective of state theory such as the role of social movements in shaping state policies and the impact of globalization on democracy and the viability of the nation-state. (Formerly PPA 525).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PPA 301 - Administrative Law
    This course examines the statutory and regulatory basis of Canadian public administration. The course explores existing techniques of control of delegated power and their role in influencing conduct. It analyses the regulatory function of administration, as well as the institutional and procedural characteristics and practices of administrative tribunals and judicial review. (Formerly PPA 629).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PPA 702
  • PPA 303 - Financial Management
    This course will provide students with an overview of public sector planning and budgetary processes, the financial management systems within governmental organizations, and mechanisms for ensuring accountability. Changing structures of accountability and the merging of private and public sector budgeting, planning and management principles will be critically evaluated. Students will also be given hands on training in accessing the financial and budgetary information relevant to public and parapublic organizations. (Formerly PPA 600).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 422
    Antirequisites: INP 915
  • PPA 319 - Politics of Work and Labour
    This course examines how labour, employers and government interact to regulate how Canadians work. Students will acquire an enriched understanding of the employment environment in their career field. An historical context is first established to explain the evolution of work, unions and government labour policy in Canada. The course then examines the legislative framework before exploring such controversial employment issues as union organising, public sector collective bargaining, strikes, minimum wage, overtime, and health and safety issues. (Formerly POG 319).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PPA 333 - Research Methods in Public Administration
    This is a one-semester course utilizing both lecture and lab experience. No familiarity with the fundamental elements of research or statistics is assumed. The course gives students of public administration the practical methods needed to statistically describe and analyze phenomena and to present those results. Emphasis throughout the course is on practical uses and application of these techniques, rather than on their mathematical derivations. (Formerly PPA 524).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: ACS 401, POG 230
  • PPA 335 - Theories of Bureaucracy
    This course surveys different approaches to organization and bureaucracy in advanced industrial societies. The major focus is on the exercise of power and control in organizations and the implications of this for different organizational groups. The course also examines a number of areas about which traditional approaches have been relatively silent, especially those dealing with race, gender and class. Another major theme of the course involves analysis of the changing nature of work, focusing on how new information technologies have affected the distribution of power and control in the workplace. (Formerly PPA 624).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 422
  • PPA 401 - Collaborative Governance
    This course examines the expanding use of "partnerships" between government and other agents, both public and private, in the delivery of "public goods". Challenged by fiscal pressures and demands for more involvement in policy-making and delivery of services, governments have experimented with new mechanisms ranging from integrated procurement to networked regulation. This course will consider the ideological drivers, management practices and consequences of these new administrative arrangements on governance, public administration and democracy. (Formerly PPA 601).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 422 or POG 210
    Antirequisites: PPA 701
  • PPA 402 - Program Planning and Evaluation
    When governments choose to intervene in a policy area, they create programs. This course examines the process by which planning and evaluation of government programs takes place and explores the various methods that are used to determine whether programs are achieving their objectives. Programs in a broad range of areas will be examined, including health, criminal justice, education, welfare, environment, housing, poverty, and development. (Formerly PPA 602).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 422
    Antirequisites: INT 900, SWP 932
  • PPA 403 - e-Government
    Deployment of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in public administration has influenced the state's internal operations, modes of service delivery, and interactions between the state and society. The course examines e-government policy, e-administration, e-service, and e-democracy. It also investigates key challenges e-government faces: privacy and security, digital divide, and legal infrastructure. (Formerly POG413).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 422 or POG 100
  • PPA 404 - Issues in Public Administration
    This course responds to key issues in today's rapidly evolving public sector. Students will examine key issues in Canadian and comparative context. Using applied and theoretical reading, class discussions, case studies and presentations from guests who are experienced practitioners at all levels of government, the course emphasizes issue analysis in the context of public sector change and reform. Consequently, the issues covered by this course will change from year to year. (Formerly PPA 604).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 422
    Antirequisites: PPA 704
  • PPA 411 - Advanced Public Policy

    This course assumes knowledge of the policy-making process, both domestic and comparative. It focuses on current challenges in public policy, including "wicked" problems to which policy responses are sought by society and political decision-makers. This course will emphasize more advanced theoretical and methodological underpinnings and tools of policy analysis. The global and interconnected nature of public policy will be examined through the use of selected cases.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 211 or POG 214
  • PPA 414 - Comparative Public Policy
    Contemporary public policy is inherently comparative in nature. Policy advisors, decision-makers and citizens are increasingly exposed to the policies of other jurisdictions. They are also increasingly prone to use this information to settle policy disputes. Comparisons of several countries and policies are used in order to better understand the nature of policy making in general. These countries and policies may vary from year to year in order to study current policy issues.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 214 or POG 314 or PPA 211 or PPA 623
    Antirequisites: PPA 700
  • PPA 425 - Intergovernmental Relations
    This course examines both the formal and informal relations between the federal and provincial governments of Canada, as well as the effect these relations have on Canadian politics and public policies. Themes include national unity and regional diversity, elite decision making and democratic participation, the Aboriginal question, Quebec separation, and the effects of federal/provincial turf wars on social, environment and economic policies and programs. The course culminates in a 1st Minster's Conference simulation. (Formerly PPA 650).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 102 or PPA 422 or (POG 110 and POG 210) or POL 332 or PPA 120
    Antirequisites: POG 416
  • PPA 490 - Public Administration Themes
    This course will explore selected themes chosen by the instructor through applied and theoretical reading, class discussion, and presentations from guests who are experienced practitioners at all levels of government. The themes will vary according to the instructor, but will focus on particular challenges to public administration and governance. Please consult the department website for more detail.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 211 and (PPA 235 or PPA 303 or PPA 319)
  • PPA 501 - Public Sector Leadership

    This course will offer an overview of literature in public sector leadership in a comparative context (Canadian, other Westminster systems, republican regimes), and include the opportunity to hear and meet public sector leaders who have experienced leadership first-hand. The capstone assignment will focus on leadership in a chosen field of inquiry. Designed for students in the post-baccalaureate Certificate in Public Administration and Leadership, this course should be attempted by undergraduate students only upon completion of all undergraduate program courses.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 211 and PPA 404
    Antirequisites: INP 913, MHR 640
  • PPA 50A/B - Practicum

    In this course, students will complete applied projects drawing on their previous studies in the program and their public administration work environment and experience. The practicum is based on experiential learning, focusing on knowledge skills and career-relevant modules completed over the course of the year. The applied projects can be focused on the students' past, current, or future public administration work environment/organization. See Department website for enrolment requirements. (Formerly PPA30A/B).

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs./3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 2.00
    Billing Units: 1/1
    Count: 2.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
    Antirequisites: PPA 31B, PPA 51B
  • PPA 51A/B - Public Policy Research Paper

    The student will propose a topic in public policy for independent study, research, and analysis. The research paper topic is authorized, supervised, and evaluated by a member of faculty. Students are advised to take this course near the end of their program studies. (Formerly PPA 31A/B).

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs./3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 2.00
    Billing Units: 1/1
    Count: 2.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 414 or PPA 603
    Antirequisites: PPA 30B, PPA 50B
  • PPA 700 - Comparative Indigenous Politics/Policies
    This course examines the key issues in contemporary comparative indigenous policy and politics by comparing both the similarities and the differences between the North American experience and that of indigenous people from other lands. What are the key political and economic processes that characterize the challenges and problems currently facing indigenous nations and communities in regions around the world? The relevance of Aboriginal knowledge and wisdom to the search for solutions to contemporary environmental problems and survival issues is examined.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: POG 440 or PPA 124
    Antirequisites: PPA 414, PPA 603
  • PPA 701 - Indigenous Public/Private Partnerships
    This course examines the role of public/private partnerships in the economic development and delivery of services in Aboriginal communities. The challenges and opportunities of First Nations communities partnering with private and public sector organizations will be assessed, particularly in the context of governance and administration issues.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 124 or POG 440
    Antirequisites: PPA 401, PPA 601
  • PPA 702 - Administrative Law in Indigenous Context
    This course examines the statutory and regulatory basis of public administration in the context of First Nations communities. It analyzes the regulatory function of administration, as well as the institutional and procedural characteristics and practices of administrative tribunal and judicial review, and assesses their relevance for First Nations communities and peoples.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 124 or POG 440
    Antirequisites: PPA 301, PPA 629
  • PPA 703 - Dispute Resolution in Indigenous Context
    This course introduces students to the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR), with an in-depth focus on mediation. The course combines basic theory and concepts of ADR and conflict analysis or diagnosis, along with applying ADR in practical situations within Aboriginal communities. Students will assess the relevance of ADR and mediation within an Aboriginal context, and formulate appropriate adaptations.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 124 or POG 440
    Antirequisites: ACS 201
  • PPA 704 - Current Issues in Indigenous Governance
    This course is designed to be responsive to addressing key issues which emerge in the rapidly evolving establishment of Aboriginal governance. Consequently, the issues covered by this course will change from year to year. Possible areas of study include Indian Act reform, Social Policy in the context of Self-Governance, Bill C - 31, Citizenship, the Constitution and Off-Reserve Peoples.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 700
    Antirequisites: PPA 404, PPA 604
  • PPA 705 - Sustainable Development and First Nations
    This course will examine alternative models of development for Aboriginal communities. Fundamental concepts of development and progress will be assessed in the context of aboriginal culture and traditions. Examples of alternative and sustainable development in other jurisdictions will be evaluated in terms of their relevance for First Nations communities and nations within Canada.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PPA 124 or POG 440