Skip to main content
  • PSY 102 - Introduction to Psychology I
    This course introduces students to psychology, the scientific study of behaviour and cognition, by examining the basic principles of psychology and their applications to everyday experience. The course surveys some core areas of psychology including research methods, biological bases of behaviour, sensation and perception, memory, and cognition.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PSY 105
  • PSY 105 - Perspectives in Psychology
    This course introduces students to psychology by exploring several viewpoints within the discipline, such as the biological, behaviourist/learning, cognitive, and psychodynamic perspectives. The emphasis is on examining the ways in which these perspectives have influenced our understanding of how people act, think, and feel, and the contributions that each has made to psychology as a discipline.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: PSY 102
  • PSY 108 - Applied Problem Solving
    This course offers a general introduction to issues associated with effective thinking and problem solving. The focus is on procedures for identifying and solving problems, the role of memory in thinking, and methods of making decisions. Factors that interfere with effective thinking, such as humans' information-processing limitation, biases, and common errors in logic are also discussed.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PSY 308
  • PSY 124 - Social Psychology
    This course examines the influence of social factors on the behaviour of the individual. Topics include affiliation, aggression, prejudice, social cognition, the development and measurement of attitudes, persuasion, socialization, conformity and group behaviour. These topics are explored from a North American and cross-cultural perspective.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 105
    Antirequisites: PSY 504
  • PSY 202 - Introduction to Psychology II
    This course continues the introduction to psychology from PSY 102, with a focus on applying psychological principles in different contexts. The course surveys some core areas of psychology, including personality, development over the life span, behaviour in a social context, and psychological disorders.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 105
  • PSY 209 - Industrial Psychology
    This course applies psychology to the history and problems of work; personnel selection and individual differences; training and evaluation; the role of motivation; and the structure, process, and dynamics of organizations.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
  • PSY 214 - Psychopharmacology
    This course examines a variety of issues surrounding the use, mechanisms, and actions of psychoactive or mind-altering drugs. The course focuses on two main contextual topic areas: drug addiction, and drug treatment of mental illness. Each of these areas is explored in depth, including the role of genes, biochemistry, cognition, and personality factors.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 607
  • PSY 215 - Psychology of Addictions
    This course introduces students to basic principles and issues in the area of addiction, the factors that influence its development, and the methods used to treat it. The similarities and differences between addictive disorders and other forms of psychopathology are discussed. The course studies both experimental and clinical approaches to addiction. The course covers the various instruments and methods used by addiction researchers and clinicians and discusses their strengths and weaknesses.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 217 - Psychology and Design
    Environmental Psychology and Design studies environmental psychology in the context of design practice. The course examines interaction between environments and human behaviours, as well as the individual differences related to age, gender, and cultural background. Through discussions of research and illustrations from design considerations, the course incorporates fundamental environmental psychology theories into design practice.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PSY 518
  • PSY 300 - Psychology and Law
    Psychology's empirical perspective sometimes complements the legal system's rule-based nature, and sometimes the two disciplines are at odds. This course focuses on the application of psychological theory, methods, and data to various procedures and issues in the legal system, including eyewitness evidence, the detection of deception, jury selection and jury decision-making, and sentencing.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 302 - Child Development
    This course introduces students to the methods, theories, findings and practical applications of research in the area of child development. The focus is on describing the significant changes in physical, cognitive, social and emotional development and on explaining why these changes occur. This course also discusses the immediate contextual influences of families, peer groups, and schools as well as on the broader contextual influences of subculture, culture, and historical era.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 105
    Antirequisites: CLD 204, CLD 205, CLD 206
  • PSY 304 - Psychology of Gender
    This course involves an examination and critique of psychological theory and research related to gender. Broad topics to be addressed include: gender development, stereotyping and gender roles, sexism, and the impact of gender on intimate relationships, achievement, and psychological and physical health. A key goal of the course is to foster an appreciation for how gender may be relevant to students' working and personal lives.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 105
    Antirequisites: PSY 535
  • PSY 308 - Psychology of Thinking
    This course discusses human information-processing abilities and limitations in critical-thinking contexts such as solving problems, making decisions, testing hypotheses, and understanding probabilities. Individual and social factors that affect the efficiency of these processes will be examined, and the consequences of poor thinking processes for the individual and for society will be considered.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: LL
    Antirequisites: PSY 108
  • PSY 324 - Biological Psychology
    This course is concerned with integrating the understanding of human behaviour and the understanding of physiological mechanisms relating to behaviour, particularly those of the nervous system and brain. Students are introduced to neurons and neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and the methods used in physiological research. These core areas allow students to understand how nervous system mechanisms contribute to sensorimotor function, ingestion, sexual behaviour, memory, thought, language and consciousness, addictions and psychological disorders.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 325 - Psychological Disorders
    This course examines conceptions of abnormality, how psychological disorders are classified, and how they are treated. The DSM classification system and alternative systems will be critically considered, and the causes of psychological disorders will be discussed from a variety of perspectives (e.g., biological, behaviourist, sociocultural). Disorders to be discussed include (but are not limited to) depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders, and eating disorders. In addition, the course includes consideration of cross-cultural factors, and ethical issues.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 606
  • PSY 335 - Clinical Psychology
    Clinical psychology concerns the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of individuals who experience social, emotional, behavioural, and mental health problems. Topics covered include the history of clinical psychology, professional and ethical issues, assessment and diagnosis of mental health problems, modalities of treatment (e.g., individual, group, family), therapeutic orientations and their methods and techniques, and current issues. This course combines a study of theory, research, and practice.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 325
  • PSY 402 - Adult Development
    All of us hold beliefs about what it means to be an adult and what it means to grow old. In this course, students examine their beliefs in light of scientific evidence on adult development and aging. Theories and empirical findings related to changes in physical, cognitive, personality, and social processes are examined. Contextual influences of family, culture, and historical era are emphasized. A recurrent theme is the tremendous diversity and individual variability in aging.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 411 - Research Methods and Statistics I
    This course introduces students to basic research designs, statistical concepts, and data-analysis procedures. Topics include describing and summarizing data, probability basics and hypothesis testing, simple correlation and regression, t-tests, and Chi-square analyses. A statistical software package (e.g., SPSS) is used throughout the course. This course is intended for students enrolled in the full-time BA psychology degree program or a psychology certificate.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 and PSY 202
  • PSY 412 - Human Brain Circuitry
    This course will explore the anatomical and functional organization of the human brain and spinal cord, including how the neuronal system is designed to operate the motor, sensory and cognitive systems; neural networks of the cortical and subcortical pathways; brain connectivity; and the chemo- and cyto- architecture of the brain. Lectures will include learning to identify gross brain morphology on photographic and magnetic resonance image based atlases.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 324
  • PSY 434 - Brain and Behaviour
    This course builds on the foundational content covered in PSY 324 and explores current concepts and debates surrounding the study of the human brain by looking at functional neuroanatomy as revealed in the developing brain and in disorders of the brain. Topics discussed include sensory-perceptual functions, memory and consciousness, developmental disorders, tumours and traumatic head injury, and degenerative diseases.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 324
  • PSY 504 - Social Psychology
    Social Psychology is an extremely diverse field that generally deals with people in social situations. Core topics include social behaviour such as aggression, obedience, conformity, intimate relationships, and how groups function. They also include attitudes, social cognition, social perception, prejudice and feelings of guilt, all of which are assumed to affect social behaviour. Basic methodological issues will be discussed as they pertain to the above topics. Core topics include social behaviour such as aggression, obedience, conformity, intimate relationships, and how groups function. They also include attitudes, social cognition, social perception, prejudice and feelings of guilt, all of which are assumed to affect social behaviour. Basic methodological issues will be discussed as they pertain to the above topics.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 124
  • PSY 505 - Personality Theory
    This course discusses the pattern of psychological characteristics that differentiate each of us from others and lead us to act consistently across some situations. Major perspectives on the understanding of these patterns are discussed, including the theorists aligned with each approach.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 511 - Research Methods and Statistics II
    This course continues from PSY 411 by covering more concepts and analyses commonly used in psychology research. Topics include one- and two-factor Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), multiple comparison techniques, multiple regression, and various measures of effect size. A statistical software package (e.g., SPSS) is used throughout the course. This course is intended for students enrolled in the full-time BA psychology degree program or a psychology certificate.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 411
    Antirequisites: PSY 711
  • PSY 514 - Sensory and Perceptual Processes
    Sensory and perceptual processes are the first step in understanding how people interpret their world. This course provides students with information and theory about how information is gathered and interpreted through the senses and shows students how this information is applied in clinical/health, educational and work settings. The emphasis of this course is to understand the latest findings and theories in the areas of vision, audition, touch, smell, and taste.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 and PSY 202
    Antirequisites: PSY 713, PSY 714
  • PSY 518 - Environmental Psychology
    Environmental psychology examines the interaction between people and their physical, natural, and human environments both large scale such as cities, and small scale such as residences. The course studies how we perceive and think about our environments, how our thoughts, emotions, and actions are influenced by our environments, and how we in turn affect the environments we inhabit and use.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 105
    Antirequisites: PSY 217
  • PSY 535 - Gender Issues in Psychology
    Gender is a fundamental aspect of personal and social identity. This course examines contemporary theoretical perspectives and empirical research on gender issues. Students acquire an understanding of key concepts, including gender role socialization, gender diversity, gender and sexuality, gender and work, and the role of gender in emotions and relationships. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of research and theory on gender.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 and PSY 202
    Antirequisites: PSY 304
  • PSY 544 - Evolutionary Psychology
    This course explores the biological, genetic, and environmental factors that have influenced human and non-human evolution over hundreds of thousands of years. Topics include Darwinian evolutionary theory, sex and gender differences, mate selection, group dynamics, co-operation and conflict, and emotion.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 202 and (PSY 105 or PSY 102)
  • PSY 550 - Human Sexuality
    This course covers theoretical and methodological foundations of sexuality scholarship. Multiple theoretical perspectives are adopted, including psychosocial, cross-cultural and intersectional, and psychobiological. Topics may include: the history of sexuality research, methodological issues, sexual anatomy, physiology and the sexual response cycle, gender roles and sexual relationship scripts, sexual diversity, sexual dysfunctions, attraction and communication, sexual coercion, and sexually transmissible infections.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 and PSY 202
    Antirequisites: PSY 621
  • PSY 560 - Sport, Exercise, and Performance
    Many psychological variables are associated with aspects of sport and exercise. This course will examine psychological principles which are thought to impact performance and participation and will in turn consider how physical activity might influence psychosocial outcomes such as emotions and cognitive performance.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 and PSY 202
    Antirequisites: PSY 614
  • PSY 602 - Developmental Psychopathology
    This course examines psychological disorders in children and adolescents, taking into account the developmental context in which such disorders occur. Topics include classification and assessment, anxiety disorders, depression, conduct disorders, attention deficit disorder, autism, schizophrenia, and eating disorders.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: [PSY 302 and (PSY 102 or PSY 105)] or [two of CLD 204, CLD 205, CLD 206]
  • PSY 604 - Issues in Psychology
    This course involves an in-depth examination of a specific area in psychology. Topics vary from year to year and have included the psychology of aging, and the causes of aggression and criminal behaviour. Students may contact the department to enquire about the current subject matter.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 605 - Psychology of Health and Health Care
    This course will offer insight into the psychological influences on health, with an emphasis on the application of psychological principles to health care delivery and disease prevention. Among the topics discussed are general health promotion, patient-practitioner interaction, stress, pain, and psychological issues in chronic and life-threatening illness.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 105
  • PSY 606 - Abnormal Psychology
    This course studies clinical syndromes ranging from the mild patterns of personality pathology to the more severe disorders. In addition, the techniques involved in the diagnosis of disorders and the types of therapy available will be examined.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 325
  • PSY 607 - Drugs and Human Behaviour
    This course introduces students to the social, psychological and biological factors involved in the use and effects of psychoactive drugs and drug-taking behaviour. The course examines two aspects of drug use: addiction and the drug treatment of mental disorders. It addresses current issues such as the use of designer and performance-enhancing drugs. Topics range from historical, social, and cultural aspects of psychoactive drug use, to neurobiology and pharmacology underlying drugs and drug use.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 214
  • PSY 612 - Independent Study
    This course is an opportunity for students to work with an individual faculty member on a research project, review paper or other activity that provides an in-depth experience in a specific area of psychology. Topics and format will be determined on a case by case basis.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • PSY 614 - Psychology of Sport
    This course examines sport by applying psychological theory and research to the many different domains of sport. Topics include personality and the athlete; attention, anxiety, and arousal; motivation, leadership, exercise adherence, and development of expert performance.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 560
  • PSY 615 - The Psychology of Belief and Skepticism
    This course takes a critical look at things people are willing to believe, and the psychological processes behind that belief. Basic belief (or "credulity") factors such as humans' information-processing limitations and social/motivational influences are discussed. Many beliefs are discussed, including some alleged professional techniques such as therapeutic touch, subliminal persuasion, and the detection of deception in the treatment of illness, in business, and in the legal system, respectively.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
  • PSY 620 - Psychology of Immigration
    In this course we will examine the issue of immigration from the perspective of experiences of immigrants and receiving societies. Broad topics to be addressed include: (i) immigration trends and societal effects, (ii) acculturation, ethnic identity, and cultural conflict, (iii) causes, forms, and experiences of prejudice and discrimination against immigrants, and (iv) strategies for promoting acceptance of diversity (e.g., multiculturalism). Throughout, the Canadian context of immigration will be emphasized.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 621 - Psychology of Human Sexuality
    This course examines contemporary knowledge and attitudes towards human sexuality. Multiple perspectives will be presented, including psychosocial, cross-cultural and psychobiological. Sexuality across the life span will be examined, including issues pertaining to: biological sexual differentiation, intimacy and communication, gender role development, varieties of sexual relationships and behaviour, contraception, procreative technologies, and sexually transmitted diseases and HIV.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 550
  • PSY 622 - The Psychology of Criminal Behaviour
    This course covers a range of topics regarding the onset and maintenance of criminal behaviour. A variety of perspectives are examined, including biological, learning, and psychodynamic theories, and many areas within psychology are discussed, including social psychology, cognition, lifespan development, individual differences, and the identification and treatment of psychological disorders. Specific topics may include risk factors, typologies of offenders, special populations, risk-assessment instruments, treatment and rehabilitation of offenders, and interventions to reduce criminal behaviour.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 300
  • PSY 654 - Cognitive Psychology
    This course explores the elements of human information-processing, including memory, language, intelligence and creativity, concept formation, judgment and decision making, and problem solving. The impact of humans' limited attentional resources and the 'cognitive economy' is discussed through the course, as well as some practical applications of cognitive theory and research findings.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 202 and (PSY 105 or PSY 102)
  • PSY 682 - Sleep
    This course introduces students to biobehavioural perspectives on sleep. After learning about healthy sleep across the lifespan, and understanding sleep through animal models, students will be introduced to evidence-based theories and interventions for sleep problems. The focus of the course will be on building a foundation to understand sleep disorders, most notably insomnia.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 or PSY 105
  • PSY 700 - Research Practicum
    Students work in a psychological science or clinical psychology laboratory and serve as an apprentice in a research project. Supervised by faculty and graduate students, practicum activities vary depending on the lab focus but generally involve hands-on engagement in the key steps of research from conception to production. Students receive guidance in developing their reading, research, and methodological skills and participate in lab meetings. Students prepare written reports, including a final practicum report.
    Weekly Contact: Lab: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
    Antirequisites: PSY 961
  • PSY 701 - The Psychology of Music
    The focus of this course is on the sensorimotor interactions involved in the perception and production of music. Through this lens we also consider the physics of music, its evolutionary origins, and its effects on emotion, development and creativity. An important component is the discussion of research evidence with regard to the benefits of music, including its purported capacity to support cognitive function, regulate stress, promote social cohesion, facilitate learning, and support rehabilitation.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 654
  • PSY 706 - Personal Growth and Positive Psychology
    This course focuses on growth and well-being. The first part of the course will examine different models of what is meant by growth and well-being, including the Jungian psychoanalytic, humanistic psychology and existential psychology perspectives, as well as those of Native Peoples, Yoga/Hinduism, Buddhism and Zen Buddhism. The remainder of the course will survey positive psychology's empirical findings on factors that contribute to growth and well-being (e.g., optimism, hope, meaning-making, self-esteem).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 707 - Models of Stress and Adaptation
    Every society produces stressors to which the members of that society must respond. In our society stress is commonplace, but the origins, effects and handling of stress are often poorly understood. Through the examination of psychological models of stress, this course seeks to make students aware of the stressors present in our society and of their own personal resources for adjustment and growth.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 805
  • PSY 712 - Human Memory
    This course provides a survey of classic and contemporary issues in human memory. Specific topics may include working memory, multiple memory systems, encoding and retrieval processes, familiarity and recollection, forgetting and interference, reconstructive processes, autobiographical memory, affective influences on memory, and applied memory research. The primary focus will be on the experimental literature, but we will also consider cross-cultural, developmental, neuropsychological and cognitive-neuroscience approaches to the study of human memory.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 654
  • PSY 713 - Psychology of Perception
    The focus of this course is the processing of information through the five senses. The course begins with historical and methodological considerations and proceeds with a study of various visual phenomena, such as perception of patterns, colour, depth, motion and illusions. The emphasis is on presenting the latest findings and the theories, models and systems created to understand them.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 714, PSY 514
  • PSY 714 - Visual Information Processing
    The purpose of this course is to provide students with the latest findings and theories about how we organize and understand visual information. Knowledge about visual processing contributes immensely to the creative efforts of visual artists by providing them with information and perspectives on how we comprehend pattern, shape, brightness, colour, distance, size, motion, and illusions.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PSY 514, PSY 713
  • PSY 721 - Psychological Testing
    This course introduces students to the theories and principles of test construction, evaluation, and interpretation. Content includes the history of test development; various types of tests, including intelligence, aptitude, and personality, and the different types of reliability validity. The relevance to scientific and applied perspectives is emphasized throughout.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 102 and PSY 202
  • PSY 731 - History and Theory of Psychology
    This course explores the history of modern psychology, from early philosophical and scientific roots to present day. In examining psychology's history, political and sociocultural factors are considered. The course emphasizes a critical analysis of psychological theory, research and practice. In this course, the shared and distinct historical roots of diverse systems of psychology are identified affording students an appreciation of psychology as a whole. This course is intended for psychology students in the final year of their program.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 PSY courses, one of which must be PSY 511
  • PSY 751 - Special Topics in Psychology
    This course covers an in depth examination of a topic in a specific area of Psychology. Topics vary from year to year and highlight specialized areas based on the expertise of Psychology faculty. Students are exposed to current literature and research findings and have the opportunity to conduct theoretical, laboratory, or community-based research as part of the course requirements.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
  • PSY 802 - Death, Dying and Bereavement
    This course presents a comprehensive review and critical analysis of empirical findings on death, dying and bereavement. There will be a discussion of research-based techniques for dealing with the problems and stresses encountered in helping the dying or grieving person to adjust.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 805 - Adjustment, Stress and Coping
    This course will offer insight into stress, its consequences, and what individuals can do to cope. There is a balance of theory and applied information, and although we will concentrate on psychological variables, physiological issues are also considered. Among the topics discussed: popular models of stress, sources of stress, the influence of cognitions and personality on one's appraisal process, and strategies for successful stress management.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 707
  • PSY 806 - Behaviour Modification
    This course is designed to provide students with a sound knowledge of behaviour theory and a set of skills essential to the behaviour modification process. Course requirements include completion of a project in which students design and implement a programme to modify some aspect of their own behaviour (e.g., smoking, over-eating, coping with interpersonal conflict).
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 807 - Psychology of Prejudice
    This course involves an examination and critique of psychological theory and research related to prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup relations. Broad topics to be addressed include: the causes of prejudice, contemporary manifestations of prejudice and discrimination, experiences of the targets of prejudice, and approaches to reducing prejudice and group inequality.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 940
  • PSY 808 - Community Psychology
    In general, community psychology is concerned with the application of psychological principles to social issues such as child abuse, homelessness, school violence, racism, crime, and chemical dependency. This course will examine a number of topics related to community psychology including theories of community psychology, research methods, community mental health, prevention programs, the community practitioner as social change agent, and applications of community psychology to other settings and situations.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 811 - Advanced Statistical Methods
    Students will learn to apply their knowledge of research design to specific areas of psychology; including descriptive, predictive and explanatory methods. Topics may include research designs with multiple independent and dependent variables, designs which require nonparametric procedures, and designs that use descriptive techniques such as content analysis and coding. Paired with these designs will be discussion of appropriate statistical analyses such as mixed method analysis of variance and covariance, factor analysis, regression models.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 511
  • PSY 813 - Psychology of Art and Creativity
    We are both creators and perceivers of works of art. The psychology of creativity is concerned with the perceptual, cognitive, motivational, educational and cultural factors involved in original achievement. The psychology of aesthetics examines factors that produce judgments of artistic productions as ugly or beautiful, interesting or uninteresting, simple or complex. PSY 813 is not available for credit to students who choose PSY 814.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Liberal Studies: UL
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
    Antirequisites: PSY 814
  • PSY 814 - Principles of Aesthetic Production
    Aesthetic production involves both a creator and a product, and this course examines the dynamics of each. Students are introduced to personal and cultural forces that shape creative production and to the universal aesthetic principles that govern audience responses to aesthetic products.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Antirequisites: PSY 813
  • PSY 904 - Advanced Cognition Seminar
    This seminar involves in-depth study of selected issues in cognitive psychology. Topics include: attention, concept formation, language, memory, reasoning, decision making, problem solving, visual processing, social cognition and others. The specific content of the course varies each time it is offered, according to the expertise of the faculty member. Seminars are intended for psychology students in the final year of their program.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 PSY courses, one of which must be PSY 511
  • PSY 905 - Advanced Clinical Psychology Seminar
    This seminar involves an intensive analysis of theory and research on the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders. Students receive a rigorous, empirical overview of major theoretical and practical issues in the field of clinical psychology. Specific topics may include the classification and assessment of disorders, ethical and legal issues, sensitivity and diversity, and treatment options for disorders. Seminars are intended for psychology students in the final year of their program.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 PSY courses, one of which must be PSY 511
  • PSY 908 - Advanced Developmental Seminar
    This seminar involves an in-depth study of developmental psychology by focusing on key issues in cognitive and social development across the life span. Individual topics vary from the development of memory to the development of morality. The course includes theoretical questions ("In what ways is children's thinking quantitatively or qualitatively different from adults?") and the applied implications of their answers ("In what ways should we therefore treat children differently from adults?"). Seminars are intended for Psychology students in their final year of studies.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 PSY courses, one of which must be PSY 511
  • PSY 914 - Advanced Biopsychology Seminar
    Building on previous knowledge of human neuropsychology this seminar focuses on theory, structure and function of the lobes of the human brain and its relation to the following: normal and aberrant behaviour, higher cognitive functions such as emotional processes and spatial behaviour, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, neuropsychological assessment, and legal and ethical issues in neuropsychology. Seminars are intended for psychology students in the final year of their program.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 PSY courses, one of which must be PSY 511
  • PSY 915 - Advanced Health Psychology Seminar
    This seminar involves an in-depth psychological study of health, the prevention of disease, and adjustment to chronic illness. Through discussions of the recent and historical literature, students gain an appreciation for the methods, application, and controversies in health care as viewed through a psychosocial lens. Topics may include stress, psychoneuroimmunology, pain management, lifestyle behaviour change and others. Seminars are intended for psychology students in the final year of their program.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 PSY courses, one of which must be PSY 511
  • PSY 918 - Advanced Social Psychology Seminar
    This seminar involves an in-depth analysis of current topics in social psychology. Through weekly discussions and presentations, students explore a topic or series of topics that illustrate cutting-edge research in the field. While the specific focus or theme of the seminar varies according to the instructor, topics may include the application of social psychology to marketing (persuasion), to law (forensics), to prejudice and stereotyping, and to perceptions of the self. Seminars are intended for psychology students in the final year of their program.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: A minimum of 14 PSY courses, one of which must be PSY 511
  • PSY 940 - Prejudice and Discrimination
    In this course, students will consider and critically analyse psychological theory and research concerning the basic psychological processes of prejudice, discrimination, and intergroup relations. Topics including the origins of prejudice (e.g., emotions, individual differences, etc.), modern day manifestations of prejudice and discrimination, experiences of targets of prejudice, and prejudice reduction will be explored.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 124
    Antirequisites: PSY 807
  • PSY 941 - Cross Cultural Psychology
    Cross-cultural psychology is the critical and comparative study of cultural effects on human psychology. This course examines the linkages between cultural norms and behaviour, and the ways in which particular human activities are influenced by different, sometimes dissimilar, social and cultural forces. Topics covered will include motivation, development, emotion, social perception and social interaction. Some applied aspects of cross-cultural psychology, such as prejudice and acculturative stress, will also be discussed.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Prerequisites: PSY 105 or PSY 102
  • PSY 961 - Thesis Project I

    This course requires students to establish a literature review for a topic or question that students wishes to investigate for his or her advanced research project undertaken in PSY 971. Under a supervisor's direction, the student collects primary research materials (both theoretical and experimental) and discusses them in the context of a research topic which he or she undertakes in a thesis project. Evaluation is based on the student's written review of the literature.

    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
    Antirequisites: PSY 700
  • PSY 971 - Thesis Project II
    This course requires students to conduct their own independent research project and to write a comprehensive thesis under the direction of a faculty supervisor. The thesis often takes the form of an empirical study, but can involve a theoretical or historical analysis. The thesis is written in the professional format specified by the Canadian Psychological Association and is evaluated by a committee of faculty members including the student's supervisor.
    Weekly Contact: Lecture: 3 hrs.
    GPA weight: 1.00
    Billing Units: 1
    Count: 1.00
    Consent: Departmental consent required
    Prerequisites: PSY 961 and PSY 511