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Students are not required to complete an Option in order to graduate.

Students who do not choose an Option will select any 13 courses from any of the nine Options listed throughout this Table, including at least one of ACS 800 or ACS 900 in order to graduate.

Students must complete at least one capstone course, marked below with an asterisk (*), in order to graduate.

For students completing the Philosophy option please see all required courses listed below in the Philosophy Option curriculum.

If an Option is chosen, students must select it by the end of first year in order to make the appropriate Option's course intentions. A total of nine Options is available, and each Option's requirements are identified below. Once an Option is selected, students must complete all the requirements of that Option to graduate.

 

Anthropology Studies Option

This option examines the study of anthropology in its attempts to understand the human experience, past and present, using holistic, comparative, and field based evolutionary perspectives and practices. Students will earn a strong base in anthropological history, theory and methods as well as acquire important skills allowing them to conduct research and analysis in the mode of an anthropologist, examining and interpreting the immediate world around them.

Thirteen (13) courses are required as grouped and noted below.

REQUIRED (6 courses):

ANT 100 Introduction to Anthropology
ANT 200 Anthropological Perspectives
ANT 900* Anthropology Capstone
BLG 133 Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology I
BLG 233 Biological Anthropology II
LIR 400 Ethnographic Practices

Four (4) of the following:

A maximum of two (2) courses marked with a dagger (†) may be selected from this group.

GEO 326 The Geography of Early Hominins
HIS 275 Ancient Greece and Rome
HIS 277 Mediaeval Europe, 400-1350
HIS 461 Cradle of Civilization: Ancient Near East
HIS 501 Archaeology and Material Culture
HIS 502 Life Stories: Oral History
HIS 510 Museology and Public History
HIS 559 Ancient Egypt
HIS 561 The Ottoman Empire
HIS 610 Curating the Past
HIS 662 The Mughal Empire, 1526-1764
HIS 710 Museum and Heritage Management
HIS 755 Themes in Material Culture
HIS 903 Senior Seminar I: Cross-Field Study
HST 111 World Turned Upside Down: Europe 1350-1789
HST 211 Century of Revolution: Europe 1789-1914
HST 325 History of Science and Technology I
HST 407 Canada from 1885: The Struggle for Identity
HST 425 History of Science and Technology II
HST 533 Africa Before 1850
HST 580 Natives and Newcomers to 1763
HST 680 Natives and Newcomers from 1763
HST 701 Scientific Technology and Modern Society
HST 777 Medicine from Antiquity to 1500 CE
HST 786 Science and Technology in Islamic History
NPF 559 Advanced Topics in Curatorial Practices
NPF 571 Introduction to Museum and Gallery Studies

Three (3) of the following:

Many of these courses have prerequisites.

CHY 183 Intro to Forensic Sciences
CRM 302 Criminological Theories
ECN 340 The Economics of Human Behaviour
LIR 100 Global Models in Intercultural Relations
LIR 200 Critical Practices in Intercultural Relations
LIR 300 Intercultural Negotiations
PPA 703 Dispute Resolution in Indigenous Context
PPA 705 Sustainable Development and First Nations
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology I
PSY 124 Social Psychology
PSY 202 Introduction to Psychology II
PSY 300 Psychology and Law
PSY 324 Biological Psychology
PSY 434 Brain and Behaviour
PSY 802 Death, Dying and Bereavement
SEM 101 Sign, Sense and Meaning
SEM 102 Introduction to Visual Semiotics
SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
SOC 107 Sociology of the Everyday
SOC 108 Indigenous Peoples and Decolonization
SOC 300 Sociology of Equity and Diversity
SOC 305 Sociology of Deviance
SOC 319 Sociological Perspectives on Crime
SOC 427 Indigenous Perspectives on Canada

 

Culture Studies Option

Students examine the forms of cultural expression that have become a measure of who we are and who we dream of becoming. They explore cultural identity through both high culture and popular entertainment.

Thirteen (13) courses are required as grouped and noted below†.

REQUIRED:

ACS 302 Introduction to Culture Studies

Twelve (12) from the following:

ACS 800* Senior Group Project
ACS 900* Senior Seminar
ACS 910 Fellowship Practicum
ACS 950 Directed Research Course
ENG 705 Studies in Visual Cultures
ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age
FRS 502 Feminism and French Literature
HIS 615 Film, Television and 20th C History
HIS 742 Canadian Cultural Industries
HST 119 Rise of Empires: History Through Film
HST 219 Decolonization: History Through Film
HST 657 Culture/Politics of Difference in the U.S.
HST 658 Sex in the City
IRL 100 Intro to World Art I: Pictorial Arts
IRL 500 Modern and Contemporary Art, Design
MUS 211 Music Cultures of the City
MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality
MUS 501 Music of World Cultures
MUS 505 Popular Music and Culture
PHL 365 Philosophy of Beauty
PHL 366 Existentialism and Art and Culture
PHL 401 Philosophy and Mass Culture
PHL 504 Philosophy of Art
PHL 530 Media Ethics
PHL 621 Non-Western Philosophy
PHL 710 Philosophy and Film
PHL 810 Philosophy of Cinema
PHL 921 Intellectual Property and Technology
SEM 101 Sign, Sense and Meaning
SEM 102 Introduction to Visual Semiotics
SOC 202 Popular Culture
SOC 479 Social Networks and the World Wide Web
SOC 902 Hollywood and Society
SOC 903 Action Cinema and Modernity
SOC 932 The Entertainment Industry

* All students must complete a minimum of one of: ACS 800 or ACS 900.

† Students must successfully complete one of ACS 800 or ACS 900 before enrolling in ACS 950.

Diversity And Equity Option

Our diverse and politically charged social space is the focus of this interdisciplinary option. It explores the encounters of language, perspective and value that shape contemporary politics, culture and society.

Thirteen (13) courses are required as grouped and noted below.

REQUIRED:

ACS 403 Introduction to Diversity and Equity

Twelve (12) from the following:

ACS 800* Senior Group Project
ACS 900* Senior Seminar
ACS 910 Fellowship Practicum
ACS 950 Directed Research Course
CRB 100 Introduction to the Caribbean
CRB 500 Families in the Caribbean
CRB 501 Racism and Caribbean Peoples in Canada
CRB 502 Cultural Traditions in the Caribbean
CRB 605 Caribbean Tourism: Impacts and Resistance
CRB 614 Caribbean Critical Thought
DST 501 Rethinking Disability
DST 503 Current Topics in Disability I
DST 504 Mad People's History
DST 525 Disability, Representation/s and Culture
DST 613 Strategies for Community Building
ENG 413 Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures
ENG 621 Women's Texts, Global Contexts
ENG 941 Gender and Sex in Literature and Culture
ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions
FRS 502 Feminism and French Literature
HST 112 East Meets West: Asia in the World
HST 328 Multiple Ontarios: 1784 to the Present
HST 526 Women and Gender in U.S. History
HST 580 Natives and Newcomers to 1763
HST 657 Culture/Politics of Difference in the U.S.
HST 680 Natives and Newcomers from 1763
HST 807 The Canadian Revolution: Canada 1968-2000
MUS 211 Music Cultures of the City
MUS 401 Music, Religion and Spirituality
MUS 501 Traditional Musics of the World
PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
PHL 420 Philosophy, Diversity and Recognition
PHL 621 Non-Western Philosophy
PHL 922 Religious Belief, Diversity, and Truth
POG 315 Equity and Human Rights in Canada
POL 510 The Politics of Sexual Diversity
PSY 550 Human Sexuality
PSY 560 Sport, Exercise, and Performance
PSY 620 Psychology of Immigration
PSY 807 Psychology of Prejudice
PSY 940 Prejudice and Discrimination
PSY 941 Cross Cultural Psychology
SOC 203 Social Class and Inequality
SOC 427 Indigenous Perspectives on Canada
SOC 474 Immigration, Borders and Belonging
SOC 507 Race and Ethnicity in Canadian Society
SOC 603 Sociology of Gender
SOC 608 Women, Power and Change
SOC 633 Sex, Gender Identities and Sexualities
SOC 885 Women and Islam
SOC 941 Colonialism and Racialization
SOC 943 Poverty Issues

* All students must complete a minimum of one of: ACS 800 or ACS 900.

† Students must successfully complete one of ACS 800 or ACS 900 before enrolling in ACS 950.

English Option

This option provides students with a course of study that focuses on how to read critically—that is, analyze, historicize, and politicize—a wide range of literary and cultural texts. Students examine how such things as genre, form, method, historical period, geography and nation inform narrative media, including works of literature, film, television, digital culture, and the visual arts. Through an engagement with narratives of the past and the present, students develop a critical understanding of contemporary cultural production.

Thirteen (13) courses are required, grouped as follows:

REQUIRED:

ENG 110 Literatures Across Borders
ENG 208 Introduction to Non-Fiction
ENG 400 Literary and Cultural Theory
ENG 810 Advanced English Research Methods
ENG 910* English Capstone Seminar

One course from the following:

ENG 302 Practicum: Writing in the Arts
ENG 304 Practicum: Making Digital Work
ENG 306 Practicum: Writing Poetry
ENG 307 Practicum: Writing Fiction
ENG 390 Practicum: Open Topics

Two courses from the following:

ENG 421 16C Literature and Culture
ENG 422 17C Literature and Culture
ENG 531 18C Literature and Culture
ENG 632 19C Literature and Culture
ENG 634 Romantic Explorations
ENG 635 Modernism

Five courses from the following: Students may opt for depth by selecting courses within thematic categories, or may opt for breadth by sampling broadly across those categories.

Media + Cultural Studies:
ENG 590 Studies in Word and Image
ENG 611 Film and Literature
ENG 703 Popular Literatures
ENG 705 Studies in Visual Cultures
ENG 706 Shakespeare and Performance
ENG 888 Televisual Texts and Contexts
ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age
ENG 941 Gender and Sex in Literature and Culture
Urban + Global Literatures:
ENG 203 The Literature of Indigenous Peoples
ENG 223 Literatures of Exile and Migration
ENG 408 World Literatures
ENG 409 Urban Literatures
ENG 413 Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures
ENG 416 American Literatures
ENG 417 Special Topics in American Literatures
ENG 620 English Caribbean Literatures and Cultures
ENG 621 Women's Texts, Global Contexts
ENG 623 Film/Literature: Middle East, North Africa
ENG 640 Literatures of Asia and its Diasporas
ENG 701 Canadian Literatures
ENG 710 Special Topics in Canadian Literatures
ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions
Literary Histories + Movements:
ENG 421 16C Literature and Culture
ENG 422 17C Literature and Culture
ENG 531 18C Literature and Culture
ENG 624 20C Literature and Culture
ENG 632 19C Literature and Culture
ENG 634 Romantic Explorations
ENG 635 Modernism
Rhetoric, Writing + Culture:
ENG 200 Writing as a Cultural Act
ENG 520 The Language of Persuasion
ENG 529 Controversies in Public Discourse
ENG 720 Persuasion from Plato to Present
ENG 730 The Social Life of Books
Genre Studies:
ENG 222 Fairy Tales and Fantasies
ENG 224 Children's Literature
ENG 402 Comics
ENG 517 Techniques and Topics in Creative Writing
ENG 530 Literary Non-Fiction
ENG 540 The Novel
ENG 550 Drama
ENG 560 Poetry and Poetics
ENG 570 Auto/Biography
ENG 580 The Gothic
ENG 707 Shakespeare and His World
Independent Study:
ENG 904 Independent Research Paper
ENG 907 Independent Research Project

NOTE: English courses cannot be used toward the liberal studies requirement if the English Option is chosen. Students in the English Option cannot complete the English Minor.

French Option

This option provides students with the opportunity to gain a specialization in this important linguistic and cultural field. It allows students to develop a better understanding of the culturally diverse populations of the Francophone world in Africa, Asia, Europe and North America, while acquiring critical insights into the important role that French and Francophone culture play both at a national level in this country and in the broader international context.

Thirteen (13) courses are required as grouped and noted below.

REQUIRED:

FRE 505 French Language and Culture
FRE 510 Effective Writing
FRE 605 Francophone Language and Culture
FRE 610 Cultural Context of Writing
FRE 900* Senior French Seminar

A minimum of four (4) courses from the following:

FRE 301 Intermediate French I
FRE 302 French Food, Wine and Hospitality
FRE 401 Intermediate French II
FRE 402 French Conversation and Pronunciation
FRE 501 Speaking and Writing French I
FRE 502 Communication and Business French
FRE 507 English-French Translation I
FRE 515 Introduction to Business French
FRE 516 Politics and Play in French Poetry
FRE 601 Speaking and Writing French II
FRE 602 Business French in Practice
FRE 607 English-French Translation II
FRE 707 Introduction to French-English Translation

A minimum of two (2) courses from the following:

FRE 503 Middle Ages to Classicism
FRE 508 Intro to 20th C French Literature I
FRE 509 Franco-Canadian Literature I
FRE 603 Enlightenment to La Belle Époque
FRE 608 Intro to 20th C French Literature II
FRE 609 Franco-Canadian Literature II
FRE 703 French Theatre: Classicism to Romanticism
FRE 704 Intro to Franco-Canadian Culture I
FRE 706 The Life and Times of the French Language
FRE 709 Children's Literature in French
FRE 803 French Theatre: 20th C and Contemporary
FRE 804 Intro to Franco-Canadian Culture II
FRE 901 Francophone Women Writers
FRE 902 Gender and Decadence 1850-1920
FRE 903 The Francophone Short Story
FRS 602 French Caribbean Literature and Culture

NOTE: French courses cannot be used toward the liberal studies requirement if the French Option is chosen. Students in the French Option cannot complete The French Minor.

Global Studies Option

This option explores the often volatile mix of global issues and perspectives, environmental concerns and corporate interests that drive contemporary society and culture at a time when global transformations are transcending political boundaries.

Thirteen (13) courses are required as grouped and noted below.

REQUIRED:

ACS 402 Introduction to Global Studies

Twelve (12) courses from the following:

 

ACS 800* Senior Group Project
ACS 900* Senior Seminar
ACS 910 Fellowship Practicum
ACS 950 Directed Research Course
BSM 100 The New Business: From Idea to Reality
BSM 200 The Growing Business: Breaking Even
ECN 110 The Economy and Society
ECN 220 Evolution of the Global Economy
ECN 511 Economy and Environment
ENG 413 Colonial and Postcolonial Literatures
ENG 621 Women's Texts, Global Contexts
ENG 942 Postcolonial Interventions
GEO 108 Geography of the Global Village
GEO 206 Regions, Nations and the Global Community
GEO 208 Geography of the Global Economy
GEO 372 Global Shift in the 21st Century
HIS 590 Modern International Relations
HST 112 East Meets West: Asia in the World
HST 426 Major Themes in International Relations
HST 522 The Middle East: 1908 to the Present
HST 540 Espionage: A Modern History
HST 551 Problems in 20th-Century Western Europe
HST 585 Southeast Asia: War and Peace since 1945
HST 602 Propaganda!
HST 604 The Uneasy Peace: The Cold War, 1945-90
HST 610 The Rise of the American Empire
HST 651 Problems in 20th-Century Eastern Europe
HST 702 The First World War
HST 711 Canada and the United States
HST 802 The Second World War
INP 916 Nonprofits on the Global Stage
NNS 101 Introduction to News Studies
NNS 502 Journalism and the World of Business
NNS 507 Justice and the Courts
PHL 621 Non-Western Philosophy
POG 100 People, Power and Politics
POG 225 Global Governance
POG 323 The Politics of International Development
POG 411 Canadian Foreign Policy
POG 423 Nationalism and Identity
POG 424 Human Rights and Global Politics
POG 426 Global Conflict and Peace
POG 443 Global Cities
POL 203 Politics of the Environment
POL 607 Politics of Technology and Globalization
POL 688 Colonialism and Imperialism
PSY 941 Cross Cultural Psychology
SOC 479 Social Networks and the World Wide Web
SOC 706 Globalized Labour and Consumption
SPN 704 Latin American Culture I
SPN 804 Latin American Culture II

 

* All students must complete a minimum of one of: ACS 800 or ACS 900.

† Students must successfully complete one of ACS 800 or ACS 900 before enrolling in ACS 950.

History Option

This option offers not only a study of the past, as a way to understand the present, but also a range of skills applicable to many jobs – those which require an understanding of research techniques, analysis, and logic. Each of these is a requirement of historical studies, as students must understand how to collect data, how to analyze it as to accuracy and sufficiency, and how to construct a logical argument from the evidence, if it is judged that there is sufficient evidence to support an argument.

(13) courses, grouped as follows: REQUIRED:

HIS 401 Hearing, Seeing and Speaking History
HIS 505 Locating The Past: Archival Research

 

One (1) Senior Seminar from the following*:

HIS 903 Senior Seminar I: Cross-Field Study
HIS 916 Senior Seminar II: Science, Technology and Medicine
HIS 931 Senior Seminar III: Americas
HIS 956 Senior Seminar IV: Africa
HIS 957 Senior Seminar V: Middle East
HIS 958 Senior Seminar VI: Asia
HIS 976 Senior Seminar VII: Europe
HIS 990 Senior Seminar VIII: International Relations

 

Four (4) courses from the following:

HIS 104 Ten Days That Shook The World
HIS 105 Inventing Popular Culture
HIS 106 Technology, Warfare and Social Change
HIS 107 Colonization, Colonialism and Independence
HIS 238 Canada to 1885: Creating a Nation
HIS 248 American History to 1877
HIS 265 Asia: Foundations and Modern Nations
HIS 275 Ancient Greece and Rome
HIS 277 Mediaeval Europe, 400-1350
HIS 279 Europe, 1715-1870
HIS 338 Canada since 1885: Defining a Nation
HIS 348 American History from 1877
HIS 377 Europe, 1350-1715
HIS 379 Europe, 1870-Present
HIS 461 Cradle of Civilization: Ancient Near East
HIS 462 Introduction to the Islamic World
HIS 490 International Relations from 1945

 

One (1) course from the following:

HIS 500 History and New Media
HIS 501 Archaeology and Material Culture
HIS 502 Life Stories: Oral History

Five (5) courses from the following:

HIS 500 History and New Media
HIS 501 Archaeology and Material Culture
HIS 502 Life Stories: Oral History
HIS 510 Museology and Public History
HIS 541 Canada and the First World War
HIS 556 Colonial Africa
HIS 559 Ancient Egypt
HIS 561 The Ottoman Empire
HIS 590 Modern International Relations
HIS 594 War to War: World Conflict, 1900-45
HIS 610 Curating the Past
HIS 615 Film, Television and 20th C History
HIS 656 Post-Colonial Africa
HIS 661 The Middle East from 1908
HIS 662 The Mughal Empire, 1526-1764
HIS 677 Society in the High Middle Ages, 1000-1500
HIS 678 The Renaissance in Europe
HIS 683 Victorian Britain
HIS 696 The History of Terrorism
HIS 710 Museum and Heritage Management
HIS 742 Canadian Cultural Industries
HIS 755 Themes in Material Culture
HIS 762 The Making of Modern South Asia, 1757-1947
HIS 783 20th-Century Britain
HIS 790 Modern Germany
HIS 826 Science and World Exploration
HIS 828 Science, Corporations and the Environment
HIS 845 Canada in the International Sphere
HIS 886 The British Empire and the World
HIS 898 A History of International Organizations
HIS 900 Experiential Learning I
HIS 901 Experiential Learning II

Students in the History Option cannot complete the History Minor.

NOTE: History courses cannot be used toward the liberal studies requirement if the History Option is chosen.

Inquiry and Invention Option

This option explores the institutions and ideas that generate – and depend on – scientific discovery and technological innovation. The focus is on ways in which science and technology influence our lives, individually and as a society, in the 21st century.

Thirteen (13) courses are required as grouped and noted below.

REQUIRED:

HST 325 History of Science and Technology I

Twelve (12) courses from the following:

ACS 800* Senior Group Project
ACS 900* Senior Seminar
ACS 910 Fellowship Practicum
ACS 950 Directed Research Course
BLG 181 Biology of a Living City
CHY 182 Chemistry Applications to Living Systems
ECN 511 Economy and Environment
ENG 503 Science Fiction
ENG 507 Science and the Literary Imagination
ENG 921 Narrative in a Digital Age
GEO 110 The Physical Environment
HIS 826 Science and World Exploration
HIS 828 Science, Corporations and the Environment
HST 425 History of Science and Technology II
HST 701 Scientific Technology and Modern Society
HST 777 Medicine from Antiquity to 1500 CE
HST 786 Science and Technology in Islamic History
HST 787 Astronomy vs Astrology
HST 788 Water Use in History
PCS 181 Introduction to Astronomy
PHL 500 Philosophy of the Natural Environment
PHL 509 Bioethics
PHL 552 Philosophy of Science
PHL 709 Religion, Science and Philosophy
PHL 921 Intellectual Property and Technology
SOC 611 Future Worlds: Technology and Social Change
SOC 708 Environmental Sociology

* All students must complete a minimum of one of: ACS 800 or ACS 900.

† Students must successfully complete one of ACS 800 or ACS 900 before enrolling in ACS 950.

Philosophy Option

This option provides students with a broad understanding of the main historical trends and contemporary developments within the discipline of philosophy. With its sustained and systematic plan of study in Philosophy, the option has two general objectives. First, it encourages students to read and think about philosophical issues and problems in an active and critical manner. Second, it provides students with an understanding of, and appreciation for, the contributions made by some of the greatest thinkers of the past and present.

Last offered 2021-2022 to students admitted Fall 2018 and prior. Students admitted Fall 2019 and after, see revised curriculum below.

Thirteen (13) courses, grouped as noted below:

REQUIRED:

PHL 503 Ancient and Modern Ethics
PHL 600 Classic Readings in Analytic Philosophy
PHL 601 Classic Readings Continental Philosophy
PHL 708 Introduction to Modern Philosophy

Two (2) courses from the following:

PHL 101 Plato and the Roots of Western Philosophy
PHL 201 Problems in Philosophy
PHL 333 Philosophy of Human Nature
PHL 366 Existentialism and Art and Culture

Revised curriculum begins Fall 2019 for students admitted Fall 2019 and after.

Thirteen (13) courses, grouped as noted below:

REQUIRED:

PHL 201 Problems in Philosophy
PHL 503 Ancient and Modern Ethics
PHL 600 Classic Readings in Analytic Philosophy
PHL 601 Classic Readings in Continental Philosophy
PHL 708 Introduction to Modern Philosophy

One (1) course from the following:

PHL 101 Plato and the Roots of Western Philosophy
PHL 333 Philosophy of Human Nature
PHL 366 Existentialism and Art and Culture

For all students in the Philosophy Option.

Seven (7) courses from the following: A minimum of three (3) courses marked with a dagger (†) must be completed.

PHL 101 Plato and the Roots of Western Philosophy
PHL 110 Philosophy of Religion I
PHL 187 Ancient Greek Philosophy
PHL 210 Introduction to Indian Philosophy
PHL 306 Freedom, Equality, Limits of Authority
PHL 307 Business Ethics
PHL 333 Philosophy of Human Nature
PHL 334 Ethics in Professional Life
PHL 365 Philosophy of Beauty
PHL 400 Human Rights and Justice
PHL 401 Philosophy and Mass Culture
PHL 406 Issues of Life, Death and Poverty
PHL 420 Philosophy, Diversity and Recognition
PHL 449 Philosophy of Punishment
PHL 500 Philosophy of the Natural Environment
PHL 501 Oppression and the Critique of Power
PHL 502 Aristotle
PHL 504 Philosophy of Art
PHL 505 Hegel and Marx
PHL 506 The Rationalists
PHL 508 The Empiricists
PHL 509 Bioethics
PHL 511 Kant
PHL 512 Philosophy of the Emotions
PHL 513 Phenomenology
PHL 514 Mind and Agency
PHL 515 Topics in Metaphysics and Epistemology
PHL 516 Foundations of Analytic Philosophy
PHL 520 Social and Political Philosophy
PHL 521 Personal Identity East and West
PHL 522   Philosophy and Death
PHL 525 Environmental Ethics
PHL 544 Feminist Philosophy
PHL 530 Media Ethics
PHL 550 Knowledge, Truth and Belief
PHL 551 Metaphysics
PHL 552 Philosophy of Science
PHL 597 Introduction to Formal Logic
PHL 603 Modern and Contemporary Ethics
PHL 605 Existentialism
PHL 606 Philosophy of Love and Sex
PHL 607 Contemporary Continental Philosophy
PHL 611 Philosophy of Mind
PHL 612 Philosophy of Law
PHL 614 Philosophy of Human Rights
PHL 621 Non-Western Philosophy
PHL 639 Medieval Philosophy
PHL 648 Philosophy and Literature
PHL 661 Marx, Nietzsche and Freud
PHL 700 Meta-Philosophy
PHL 707 Plato
PHL 709 Religion, Science and Philosophy
PHL 710 Philosophy and Film
PHL 711 Language, Meaning and Truth
PHL 714 Philosophy of Biology
PHL 718 Advanced Topics in Ethics
PHL 732 Topics in Political Philosophy
PHL 752 German Idealism
PHL 757 Major Figures in Western Philosophy
PHL 758 Major Figures in Eastern Philosophy
PHL 802 Project in Applied Philosophy
PHL 803 Philosophy Engaging Communities
PHL 808 Language and Philosophy
PHL 810 Philosophy of Cinema
PHL 900 Senior Philosophy Seminar
PHL 910 Senior Philosophy Seminar
PHL 922 Religious Belief, Diversity, and Truth
PHL 923 Philosophy of Religion II
PHL 924 Critical Thinking II

Note: PHL 639 will count as a course with a dagger for students admitted Fall 2018 and prior.