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Dr. Miranda Campbell

Dr. Miranda Campbell

Associate Professor
DepartmentCreative Industries
EducationPhD
OfficeKHS 349-G
Phone +1-416-979-5000 ex. 553519

Short Biography

Dr. Miranda Campbell is an Assistant Professor in the School of Creative Industries at Ryerson University. Her research focuses on creative employment, youth culture, and small-scale and emerging forms of cultural production. Her book, Out of the Basement: Youth Cultural Production in Practice and in Policy, mapped the changing realities of youth self-employment in creative fields in the 21st century, and was shortlisted for the Donner Prize for the best public policy book by a Canadian. Her involvement with creative communities includes coordination and Board of Director roles with Rock Camp for Girls Montreal, a summer camp dedicated to empowerment for girls through music education, and with WhipperSnapper Gallery, an artist-run centre focusing on emerging artists in Toronto.
 

Research Interests

Youth culture

Cultural policy

Creative Labour

Critical pedagogy

Small-scale Cultural Production

Creative industries

Gender studies

Education

 
McGill University, Education PhD
Concordia University, English Literature MA
University of British Columbia, English Literature BA
Cornell University (online), Diversity and Inclusion  Certificate
Courses Taught
CC 8959 Community-based Action Research Methods
CRI 560 Creative Industries in Berlin
CRI 810 Creative Collaboration

2019-2020: Mapping Canadian Arts-Service Organizations as Cultural Research Conduits (SSHRC Partnership Engage Grant; Principal Investigator, in collaboration with Mass Culture).

2017-2019: Community Youth Arts Programs as Creative Industries Incubators (SSHRC Insight Development; Principal Investigator)

2017-2020: Comic-Cons: An Urban Media Industry (SSHRC Partnership Development Grant; Co-Investigator with Principal Investigator Ben Woo and Co-Investigators Brian Johnson and Bart Beaty)

2018. Scaffolding and Springboarding: Final Report on the Community Youth Arts Programs as Creative Industries Incubators Research Project. http://www.youthcreativework.com/community-youth-arts

2018. “’Shit is Hard, Yo’: Young People Making a Living in the Creative Industries.” International Journal of Cultural Policy, DOI: 10.1080/10286632.2018.1547380, external link

2018. “Art Work, external link.” Maisonneuve Magazine. Issue 69. pp. 16-21.

2018. “Tavi Gevinson: Empowerment for Teenage Girls.” In S. Steinberg, ed. 30 Activists Under 30: Global Youth, Social Justice, and Good Work. Brill Press. pp. 32-39.

2016. “Downward Mobility and the Individualization of Youth Struggle: Girls as Public

Pedagogy.” Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures. Vol 8, no.1. pp. 180-201.

2016. “Girls Rock!: Best Practices in Collaborative Creative Processes at Rock Camp

for Girls Montreal.” In A. Gandini and J. Graham, eds. The Creative Industries and Collaborative Production. University of Westminster Press. pp. 177-196.

2016. “Mic Drop, external link.” Maisonneuve Magazine. Issue 60. pp. 28-35.

2016.   Every Day We’re Hustling. Podcast (6 episodes). http://everydaywerehustling.com

2015. “Moms to the Front: The Joys and Pains of Touring with Kids, external link.” Noisey (VICE).

2015. “Culture Isn’t Free: Expecting Artists to Work for Free Hands the Reins of Cultural Production to Ruling Elites, external link.” Jacobin.

2015. “Creative Entrepreneurship in the Cultural Industries: Rhetoric and Realities of

Youth Creative Work.” In S. Malliet, A. Dhoest, J. Haers, and B. Segaert, eds. The Borders of Subculture: Resistance and the Mainstream. Routledge. pp. 37-54.

2013. Out of the Basement: Youth Cultural Production in Practice and in Policy. McGill Queens’s University Press. 283 pages.

2014. Out of the Basement shortlisted for the Donner Prize for the Best Public Policy Book by a Canadian

2014. Out of the Basement shortlisted for the Gertrude Robinson Book Prize for the Best Communication Studies Book in Canada

2016. Keynote Address. Creativity, Commerce, and Community in an Era of Economic Decline: Emerging Directions in Youth Entrepreneurship. Teaching and Learning Cultural Entrepreneurship conference. Telemark University College (Bø, Norway).

2014. Guest Lecture. Generation Text: Cultural Production Amongst Youth. Possible Worlds: English Department Symposium. Vanier College (Montreal, Quebec).

2014. Guest Lecture. Why We Hate Hipsters and Why We Shouldn’t. Humanities and Public Life conference. Dawson College (Montreal, Quebec).

2014. Moderator and Organizer. Can Anyone Be a Rock Star?: The Gendered Landscape of Music Scenes and Rock Camp for Girls Montreal. Panel Discussion and Workshop. Pop Montreal Symposium (Montreal, Quebec).

2014. Panel Discussion. Producteurs culturels et artistes indépendants du Mile End, quelle cohabitation? Mémoire Mile End (Montreal, Quebec).

2014. Guest Lecture. Can a Creative Community Flourish in Silence? Sociology and Anthropology Student Union of Concordia Ethnomusicology conference (Montreal, Quebec).

2014. Guest Lecture and Panel Discussion. Crowdfunding: The New Normal? Crowdfunding and the Arts conference. ELAN Quebec (Montreal, Quebec).

2013.  Keynote Address. Creative Entrepreneurship and the Cultural Industry. Youth Subcultures: Download the Drivers conference at University Centre Saint Ignatius (University of Antwerp, Belgium).

The challenges of entering and making a living in the creative industries are increasingly well documented, but further understanding of both the sources and potential solutions to the problems of diversity, equity, and inclusion in this sector is needed. My research agenda investigates this need, seeking to better understand both organizational structures and cultural policy, while also mapping emerging responses, lived realities, and experiences of creative work. My research broadly examines the creative industries in Canada, but this research also demonstrates an awareness that the Canadian creative industries are embedded in a globalized world, where digitization has both enabled and constrained meaningful opportunities for creative work across national contexts. Methodologically, I primarily work qualitatively, informed by phenomenological, oral history, and cultural mapping frameworks. With this cultural mapping lens, I seek to better register both tangible and intangible cultural values, and have also employed quantitative means to measure and assess emerging cultural forms and labour market experiences. As I increasingly work with communities to better understand their needs, I am currently moving towards participatory action research, co-creation, and arts-based methodologies. My research is interdisciplinary, working across the fields of youth studies; creative industries, and feminist economics. I work from a creative ecology framework for the creative industries, providing the conceptual means to make bridges across sectors (economy, culture, social life); to highlight the instrumental and the intrinsic values of culture; to map the relationships between sectors of the creative economy (large vs. small; established vs. emerging); and to register the lived experiences and embodied processes of engaging with culture. I am guided by three focuses in my research agenda: 1) Emerging Cultural Trends in the Creative Industries; 2) Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Creative Industries Work; and 3) Fostering Connected Communities

2019-2020: Mapping Canadian Arts-Service Organizations as Cultural Research Conduits (SSHRC Partnership Engage Grant; Principal Investigator, in collaboration with Mass Culture).


2017-2019: Community Youth Arts Programs as Creative Industries Incubators (SSHRC Insight Development; Principal Investigator)


2017-2020: Comic-Cons: An Urban Media Industry (SSHRC Partnership Development Grant; Co-Investigator with Principal Investigator Ben Woo and Co-Investigators Brian Johnson and Bart Beaty)