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Archived Resources for Researchers and Policymakers

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Family Supports Research (Archives)

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Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2013). Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/ResearchBriefs.pdf

Six research briefs highlight recent research, suggest how to implement the research in practice, and pose reflective questions. In "Calm, Alert, and Happy" (pp. 21-26), Dr. Stuart Shanker discusses  self-regulation, including the three key steps to self-regulation and the types of stresses that require children to develop self-regulation.

 

An evaluation of the Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program

Skrypnek, B. J., & Charchun, J. (2009). An evaluation of the Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program prepared for Public Health Agency of Canada. Retrieved from Canadian Association of Family Resource Programs website: http://www.parentsmatter.ca/document/docWindow.cfm?fuseaction=document.viewDocument&documentid=420&documentFormatId=1110

Building on previous research, this is the first evaluation of the Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program to include participants from across the country and to involve a comparison group. The Nobody’s Perfect Parenting Program was developed in the early 1980s by the Public Health Agency of Canada and the Atlantic provincial health departments and aims to enhance parents’ capabilities to maintain and promote their children’s health.

 

CMEC statement on play-based learning

Council of Ministers of Education, Canada. (n.d.). CMEC statement on play-based learning. Retrieved from http://www.cmec.ca/Publications/Lists/Publications/Attachments/282/play-based-learning_statement_EN.pdf

This is a one-page statement on the benefits of play-based learning for future learning, health, and well-being.

 

The benefits of an enhanced Nobody's Perfect Parenting Program for child welfare clients including non-custodial parents

Kennett, D.J., & Chislett, G. (2012). The benefits of an enhanced Nobody's Perfect Parenting Program for child welfare clients including non-custodial parents. Children and Youth Services Review, 34(10), 2081-2087. doi: 10.1016/j.childyouth.2012.07.001

“A mixed-methods pilot project was conducted to study the effect of participation in an enhanced Nobody's Perfect Program (NP) composed of 12 three-hour weekly sessions. . . . For program completers, significant improvements were observed in knowledge and use of community resources, positive parenting interactions and parenting resourcefulness, with gains in parenting competence and efficacy approaching significance….Recommendations for parents facing multiple challenges are discussed” (p. 2081).

 

The Incredible Years® Program Series: Evaluation methods

The Incredible Years®. (n.d.). The Incredible Years® Program Series: Evaluation methods. Retrieved from http://incredibleyears.com/for-researchers/evaluation/

There are three columns in this four-page chart: “Parenting Program Claims”, “Evaluation Methods”, and “Evidence of Efficacy.” The last column lists studies that can be retrieved using the information in the chart’s bibliography.

 

Inclusion Research (Archives) 

 

Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2013). Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/ResearchBriefs.pdf

Six research briefs highlight recent research, suggest how to implement the research in practice, and pose reflective questions. In "Calm, Alert, and Happy" (pp. 21-26), Dr. Stuart Shanker discusses  self-regulation, including the three key steps to self-regulation and the types of stresses that require children to develop self-regulation.

 

Thematic study on the right of persons with disabilities to education: Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights

United Nations Human Rights. (2014). Thematic study on the right of persons with disabilities to education: Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. Retrieved from http://www.ecd-elcc.ca/eng/elcc/elcc_multiframe.shtml

The OHCHR Thematic Studies includes:

-Thematic study on the right of persons with disabilities to education. Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (A/HRC/25/29)
-Thematic study on the work and employment of persons with disabilities. Report of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (A/HRC/22/25)
-Thematic study by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on participation in political and public life by persons with disabilities (A/HRC/19/36)
-Study of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on international cooperation to support national efforts for the realization of the purposes and objectives of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
-Study of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on the structure and role of national mechanisms for the implementation and monitoring of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (A/HRC/13/29)
-Study of the High Commissioner for Human Rights on key legal measures for the ratification and implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (A/HRC/10/48)

 

CMEC statement on play-based learning

Council of Ministers of Education, Canada. (n.d.). CMEC statement on play-based learning. Retrieved from http://www.cmec.ca/Publications/Lists/Publications/Attachments/282/play-based-learning_statement_EN.pdf

This is a one-page statement on the benefits of play-based learning for future learning, health, and well-being.

 

Evidence-based practices for children, youth, and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Wong, C., Odom, S. L., Hume, K., Cox, A. W., Fettig, A., Kucharczyk, S., . . . Schultz, T. R. (2014). Evidence-based practices for children, youth, and young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Retrieved from The National Professional Development Centre on Autism Spectrum Disorders website: http://autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/sites/autismpdc.fpg.unc.edu/files/2014-EBP-Report.pdf

"The purpose of this report is to describe a process for the identification of evidence-based practices (EBPs) and also to delineate practices that have sufficient empirical support to be termed 'evidence-based'" (p. 1).

 

Early childhood measurement and evaluation tool review: Brigance Inventory of Early Development II (IED-II)ent and evaluation tool review: Brigance Inventory of Early Development II (IED-II)

Community-University Partnership for the Study of Children, Youth, and Families. (2011). Early childhood measurement and evaluation tool review: Brigance Inventory of Early Development II (IED-II). Retrieved from http://www.cup.ualberta.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/FINAL-Brigance-IED-II_June-2012.pdf

This document summarizes the Brigance Inventory of Early Development II (IED-II), including its measurement areas, purpose, length and structure, scoring and interpretation, norming sample, validity, and reliability.

Community-University Partnership for the Study of Children, Youth, and Families (CUP) has also reviewed other assessment, screening, and evaluation tools.

 

Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools – Survey results and recommendations

Inclusion BC and the Family Support Institute of BC. (2013). Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools – Survey results and recommendations. Retrieved from http://www.inclusionbc.org/sites/default/files/StopHurtingKids-Report.pdf

In July 2013, an online self-report survey was used to gain insight into BC students’ experiences with restraint and seclusion. From the results, Inclusion BC and the Family Support Institute of BC conclude that restraint and seclusion are systemic issues with negative impacts upon the learning environment, inclusive education, and students’ emotional health and well-being.

 

Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools

Inclusion BC. (2013). Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools. Retrieved from http://www.inclusionbc.org/stophurtingkids

Read or listen to data collected through an online survey of approximately 200 parents and guardians whose children had been restrained or secluded in British Columbia schools.

 

Family Supports Policy (Archives)

New Brunswick curriculum framework for early learning and child care

Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (2008). New Brunswick curriculum framework for early learning and child care. Retrieved from the Department of Social Development http://www.gnb.ca/0000/ECHDPE/pdf/Acknowledgements-e.pdf

This resource provide helpful and thorough information regarding the Framework for Early Learning and Child Care. "In the New Brunswick Curriculum Framework for Early Learning and Child Care you will find the following sections: Section One describes the context and values from which the curriculum framework flows; Section Two outlines four broad goals for early learning and care, which are subsequently expanded in Section Four; Section Three addresses learning principles, documentation/assessment, and continuities/transitions; Section Four is an expansion of each of the four broad goals to illustrate what’s involved in learning, and the provisions and professional practices to support learning and care; Section Five includes a literature review and bibliography that grounds the work in contemporary theory and practice" (p 2).

 

Early childhood learning initiatives

Department of Education. (2014, June 6). Early childhood learning initiatives. Retrieved from Newfoundland Labrador Canada http://www.ed.gov.nl.ca/edu/earlychildhood/initiatives.html#frame

"Funding was announced in the 2011 Speech from the Throne to advance the development and implementation of a provincial early childhood learning strategy entitled Learning from the Start. Initial focus is on the birth to three years period with a specific focus on supporting parents and the important role they play in supporting their children’s early development and learning. Approved initiatives include: development and implementation of an early childhood learning curriculum framework, parent resources (including parent kits and website development), early literacy programming, promotional campaign focusing on the early years and play based learning; website development; and evaluation including implementation of the Early Development Instrument (EDI) and an early childhood evaluation framework" (para 4).

 

Family support services

Society for Children and Youth of BC. (n.d.). Family support services. Retrieved from http://www.childfriendlycommunities.ca/#!family-support-services/c1rv1

The left column of this web page relates family supports services to specific articles of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.

 

Pedagogical leadership: Lead from where you stand, symposium report

Pedagogical leadership: Lead from where you stand, symposium report. (2010). Retrieved from http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/atkinson/UserFiles/File/Events/2010-02-01%20-%20Pedagogical%20Leadership/PedagogicalLeadership_SymposiumReport.pdf

The Pedagogical Leadership: Lead from Where you Stand symposium included contributions from the Early Learning Division, Ministry of Education. The morning session considered “what resources, supports and professional learning are necessary to establish effective teams of teachers and early childhood educators in the new early learning programs” (p. 2) and the afternoon session considered “what kind of structural changes and resources are necessary under municipal leadership to establish a comprehensive approach to child and family services” (p. 3) .

 

Best Start: Ontario’s plan for early learning and child care

Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2005). Best Start: Ontario’s plan for early learning and child care. Retrieved from http://www.ontla.on.ca/library/repository/mon/11000/255080.pdf

On May 6, 2005, Ontario signed an Agreement-in-Principle with the federal government providing funds to expand and strengthen Ontario’s child care system. Best Start: Ontario’s Plan for Early Learning and Child Care describes a preliminary action plan for how these funds will be used towards the province’s Best Start Plan.

 

Best Start phase I: Laying the foundation: Implementation planning guidelines for Best Start Networks

Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2005). Best Start phase I: Laying the foundation: Implementation planning guidelines for Best Start Networks. Retrieved from http://www.ontla.on.ca/library/repository/mon/11000/255077.pdf

 “Best Start is a comprehensive, evidence-based early learning and care strategy designed to help give Ontario’s children the best possible start in life and help them achieve success in school” (p. 4). Based on regional and provincial consultations with French and English stakeholders, The Ministry of Children and Youth Services (MCYS) revised its guidelines for the planning and implementation of Best Start networks.

 

Family support

BC Association of Family Resource Programs. (n.d.). Family support. Retrieved from http://www.frpbc.ca/media/uploads/files/FAMILY_SUPPORT_-_definition_REVISED_March_12.pdf

The BC Association of Family Resource Programs defines “family support” and lists the characteristics and results of family support.

 

Breaking the cycle: The fifth progress report: Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy 2013 annual report

Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2013). Breaking the cycle: The fifth progress report: Ontario's Poverty Reduction Strategy 2013 annual report. Retrieved from http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/documents/breakingthecycle/2013AnnualReport.pdf


"Ontario’s first Poverty Reduction Strategy, Breaking the Cycle, was transformational in nature. It set out a bold vision to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty by focusing on children and their families" (p. 2). The 2013 annual report notes progress towards the goals of the Strategy, discusses indicators and outcomes, assesses the Strategy, and speaks broadly about plans for a new five-year strategy.

 

Bill 143, Child Care Modernization Act, 2013

Bill 143, Child Care Modernization Act, 2013. (2013). 1st reading Dec. 3 2013, 41st Parliament, 2nd Session. Retrieved from the Legislative Assembly of Ontario website: http://www.ontla.on.ca/web/bills/bills_detail.do?locale=en&Intranet=&BillID=2913

If enacted, the Child Care Modernization Act (2013) will introduce the Child Care and Early Years Act, 2013, repeal the Day Nurseries Act, and amend both the Early Childhood Educators Act (2007) and the Education Act. The first reading of Bill 143 passed.

 

Ontario Early Years Policy Framework

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2013). Ontario Early Years Policy Framework. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/OntarioEarlyYear.pdf

 “The Ontario Early Years Policy Framework builds on our collective progress and provides a vision for the early years to ensure children, from birth to age six, have the best possible start in life. The framework is supported by a set of principles and is meant to provide strategic direction to our early years partners both within and outside of government. Moving forward, the Ontario Early Years Policy Framework will guide our collective approach to the development and delivery of early years programs and services for children and families” (p. 3).

 

Why we should use the term illegalized immigrant

Bauder, H. (2013). Why we should use the term illegalized immigrant (RCIS Research Brief No. 2013/1). Retrieved from Ryerson Centre for Immigration and Settlement website: https://www.ryerson.ca/content/dam/rcis/documents/RCIS_RB_Bauder_No_2013_1.pdf

Following the Associated Press’ decision to no longer sanction the term illegal immigrant, Bauder suggests illegalized immigrant be used internationally and across sectors, despite variations in the ways that people are illegalized.

 

Right from the start: Report of the Expert Advisory Group on the Early Years Strategy

Expert Advisory Group on the Early Years Strategy. (2013). Right from the start: Report of the Expert Advisory Group on the Early Years StrategyRetrieved from Department of Child and Youth Affairs website http://www.dcya.gov.ie/documents/policy/RightFromTheStart.pdf?utm_source=November+2013+update&utm_campaign=November+2013+update&utm_medium=email

This report contributes to the development of Ireland’s first Early Years Strategy for children 0-6 years and families. Using evidence from literature and their professional experience, the members of the Expert Advisory Group propose a vision, principles, themes, and core recommendations based on progressive universalism and the rights of children. The authors also discuss 5 “peaks,” or challenges, that must be addressed to transform Ireland’s early years landscape and review governmental policy and international Early Years policies comparable to Ireland’s.

 

Renewing Ontario’s poverty reduction strategy: Consultation booklet

Government of Ontario. (2013). Renewing Ontario’s poverty reduction strategy: Consultation booklet. Retrieved from http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/documents/breakingthecycle/PovertyBooklet.pdf

The Government of Ontario presents what has been accomplished since its Poverty Reduction Strategy was introduced in 2008 and invites the public to share their perspectives to inform a new Poverty Reduction Strategy.

 

Progress report April 1st , 2011 to March 31st, 2013

New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation. (2013). Progress report April 1st , 2011 to March 31st, 2013. Retrieved from http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/ProgressReportMarch2013.pdf

The Overcoming Poverty Together plan, 2009-2014, is a non-partisan effort to reduce poverty in New Brunswick. The most recent document reports on the Overcoming Poverty Together plan, the activities of twelve Community Inclusion Networks, and the status of priority actions established in 2009.

 

International review of leave policies and research 2013

Moss, P. (2013) International review of leave policies and research 2013. Available at: http://www.leavenetwork.org/lp_and_r_reports/

This annual review provides information from 34 participating countries related to each employment-related measures to support working parents, early childhood education and care policy and information, and related publication and resources.  The main types of leave policies are defined and countries are compared in such areas as the main types of leave and policy changes and developments since the 2012 review.

Past reviews can be retrieved from International Network on Leave Policies and Research website.

 

Family supports

Canadian Association for Community Living. (2013). Family supports. Retrieved from http://www.cacl.ca/area/family-supports

The Canadian Association for Living articulates its vision of family supports as one of ten steps toward inclusive communities.

 

Inclusion Policy (Archives)

Strengthening communities for Canadian children with disabilities: Discussion document

The Kids Help Foundation. (2012). Strengthening communities for Canadian children with disabilities: Discussion document. Retrieved from YUDU website: http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1xtq4/TheSandboxProject/resources/index.htm?referrerUrl=http%3A//free.yudu.com/item/details/565280/The-Sandbox-Project%3Fedit_mode%3Don

“The purpose of the ‘Strengthening Communities for Canadian Children with Disabilities’ project is to engage key stakeholders to examine the capacity for creating community environments that strengthen social development for children and youth who face significant challenges due to disability” (p. 2). This discussion paper, to be presented by Dr. Anne Snowdon at The Sandbox Project’s 2nd Annual Conference on January 19th, 2012, reports on the projects’ findings and proposes recommendations. 

 

A case for inclusive education

Parekh, G. (2013). A case for inclusive education. Toronto, Canada: Toronto District School Board. Retrieved from
http://inclusiveeducationcanada.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/a-case-for-inclusive-education.pdf

"This review of the literature looks at important factors pushing the inclusion agenda both locally and globally. It also reviews strategies supporting the inclusion of students with SEN at the system, school, and classroom levels" (p. 1).

 

Proposed changes to the ASD Diagnosis: A review of implications for early childhood programs

Underwood, K., & Langford, R.  (2011). Proposed changes to the ASD Diagnosis: A review of implications for early childhood programs, prepared for the Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development. Retrieved from Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development website: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/atkinson/UserFiles/File/Policy%20Commentaries/AC_PolicyCommentary_Autism_and_RelatedConditions.pdf

Underwood and Langford discuss the now-implemented changes to the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). The needs and benefits, as well as the risks, of a diagnosis are discussed in regards to the implications for service access, stigma, navigating the system of services, and the rights of families.  The authors emphasize “It is important that early childhood educators and resource consultants do not use the diagnostic criteria to exclude children from an accessible early learning experience” (p. 2)

 

Support for children with special educational needs (SEN)

(2013, April). Support for children with special educational needs (SEN). European Commission. Retrieved from http://europa.eu/epic/studies-reports/docs/eaf_policy_brief_-_sen_children_post_copy_edit_15.10.13.pdf

"The purpose of this policy brief is to inform decision makers on policy trends and practices in relation to children with SEN across Europe. It first provides an overview of existing evidence on effective diagnosis and early intervention for these children, before outlining progress towards greater inclusion of children with SEN in mainstream education, and efforts to support their parents and wider family unit" (p. 1).

 

Inclusive education

Alberta Education. (n.d.). Inclusive education. Retrieved from http://www.education.alberta.ca/department/ipr/inclusion.aspx

Browse a variety of resources related to the government of Alberta’s efforts to create an inclusive education system. Resources include an Inclusive Education Planning Tool, video vignettes related to a pilot for collaborative service delivery for preschoolers with severe disabilities, and policy archives.

 

Inclusion of Canadians with intellectual disabilities: A national report card 2012

Canadian Association for Community Living. (2012). Inclusion of Canadians with intellectual disabilities: A national report card 2012. Retrieved from http://www.cacl.ca/sites/default/files/Report%20Card%202012%20ENG.pdf

This report card focuses on two of the 10 objectives in the Canadian Association for Community Living’s Vision 2020 agenda for a more inclusive Canada: Achieving Equality Rights and Global Inclusion.

 

Submission to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities Study of Bill C-44

Canadian Association for Community Living. (2012). Submission to the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities Study of Bill C-44: Helping families in need. Retrieved from http://www.cacl.ca/sites/default/files/CACL%20Brief%20-%20Bill%20C-44%20-%20Oct%202012-final.pdf

In this brief submission I will provide a profile of parents of children with disabilities through analysis of national data sets and other Canadian research, look to the current policy context in Canada for support for caregivers of children with disabilities and draw on the lived experience of families who are a part of our movement in order to outline the challenges that families face today” (p. 2).

 

Strengthening inclusion, strengthening schools

Porter, G. L., & AuCoin, A. (2012). Strengthening inclusion, strengthening schools: Report of the review of inclusive education programs and practices in New Brunswick schools: An action plan for growth. Retrieved from Government of New Brunswick Department of Education and Early Childhood Development website: http://www.gnb.ca/0000/publications/comm/Inclusion.pdf

This report provides an update regarding the actions taken in response to the MacKay report in both the anglophone and francophone sectors. Twelve themes expressed through district, school, and stakeholder consultations are shared, as are statistics and recommendations.

Related Resources:

MacKay, A. W. (2006). Connecting care and challenge: Tapping our human potential—Inclusive education: A review of programming in New Brunswick.  Retrieved from Government of New Brunswick website: http://www.gnb.ca/0000/publications/mackay/MACKAYREPORTFINAL.pdf

This review of inclusive education in New Brunswick begins with a background report of legal issues, best practices, Canadian practices and research, and the New Brunswick context relevant to inclusive education.  Themes and recommendations that emerged from a consultation process are then shared.

 

2013 Ontario budget: Budget papers

Sousa, C. (2013). 2013 Ontario budget: Budget papers. Retrieved from Government of Ontario website: http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/budget/ontariobudgets/2013/papers_all.pdf

Review the goals and numbers of the current budget, including provisions for families, children, and individuals with disabilities.

 

Briefing paper: Inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream early childhood care and education

National Disability Authority. (2011). Briefing paper: Inclusion of children with disabilities in mainstream early childhood care and education. Retrieved from www.nda.ie/cntmgmtnew.nsf/0/.../$File/preschoolinclusion.doc

This paper from Ireland presents the research and context relevant to early childhood inclusion, then presents case studies from England, New Zealand, Finland, and the United States. The purpose is to make recommendations to the Office of Disability and Mental Health, Department of Health for achieving inclusion for children with disabilities in early childhood care and education.

 

Archived Resources for Parents and Caregivers

Family Supports Resources

Inclusion Resources

Family Supports Resources (Archives)

Search tip:

To search within a web page for specific text, press Ctrl-F on the keyboard and type in your search text in the search box that comes up in the browser. Then hit 'Enter' and the highlighted text should appear within the page. Press 'Enter' to cycle through all the highlighted text.

Start with play

field-placement-2

Early Childhood Development Association of PEI. (2013). Start with play. Retrieved from Start with Play website: http://startwithplay.ca/en/

“Use this website as a resource to discover how your child learns through play” (para. 3).

 

How to feed your growing child: Ages 2 to 5

Best Start. (2009, January). How to feed your growing child: Ages 2 to 5. Retrieved from http://beststart.org/resources/nutrition/pdf/HTFC-ENG.pdf

This resource provides helpful information on how to feed your growing child from ages 2 to 5 including: Canada's food guide, how much to eat, preparing and eating meals together, offering food groups, etc.

 

Life after adoption—Settling in & tips

Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2011). Life after adoption—Settling in & tips. Retrieved from http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/topics/adoption/life-after-adoption/settlingin.aspx

Families who are considering adoption, have chosen to adopt, or have adopted a child will find resources, including strategies for settling in as a family.

 

Guide to family programs and community organizations: Resources

Simmons, J. (2009). Guide to family programs and community organizations: Resources. Retrieved from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health website: http://www.camh.ca/en/hospital/Documents/www.thefamilycouncil.ca/pages/FRC%20Resource%20Manual.pdf

This directory lists services available to families in Toronto. Listed services included family service organizations, peer support groups, supportive housing, and therapy. Symbols are used to indicate whether there is a cost for service or a waiting list.

 

Toronto early childhood and family resource listing

Early Identification and Intervention Committee of the Child and Family Network. (n.d.).Toronto early childhood and family resource listing. Retrieved from http://healthykidstoronto.ca/

“Welcome to the Toronto Early Childhood and Family Resource System: Pathway and Resource Listing, a tool to help link families to appropriate community services and programs that promote development, reduce risks, and address developmental concerns” (para. 1).

Incredible Years Parent Program previews

The Incredible Years. (2013, January 22). Incredible Years Parent Program previews [video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5KZRqMcrl_k&list=PLTQ3LIdfj72Ev4bfh7gkQ1ATc-48JwXb_

"Incredible Years Parenting program helps parents meet the social and emotional needs of young children. The program strengthens parenting skills and fosters involvement in children's lives to promote children's academic, social and emotional competencies and reduce conduct problem" (para. 1). Six videos provide an overview of the program and of particular programs, such as the toddler program.

 

Toy safety

Government of Canada. (2013). Toy safety. Retrieved from http://healthycanadians.gc.ca/kids-enfants/toy-jouet/index-eng.php

Parents and caregivers can download factsheets about toy safety in general and in reference to toys with particular parts  (e.g., magnets or small pieces).

 

Financial help

Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2011). Financial help. Retrieved from http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/topics/financialhelp/index.aspx

This web page links to information about tax credits for families in Ontario.

 

Family violence and prevention program: Resources and supports available in Manitoba

Manitoba Family Services and Labour. (n.d.). Family violence and prevention program: Resources and supports available in Manitoba. Retrieved from http://www.manitoba.ca/fs/fvpp/resources.html

Resources related to counselling, crisis service, shelter, residential programs, supervised access programs, public education, sexual assault, and adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse are organized by region.

 

Elder mediation for stronger family identity

Sterritt, E. (2013). Elder mediation for stronger family identityTransitions, 43(1), 13-14. Retrieved from http://www.vanierinstitute.ca/include/get.php?nodeid=3343

Elder mediation strengthens family identity while involving family members in resolving issues when an elderly family member requires increased assistance. Elderly mediation takes a proactive, practical approach to resolving family crises with a focus on the future.  

 

Dividing matrimonial property: Common-law partners still excluded from property laws

Thompson, R. (2013). Dividing matrimonial property: Common-law partners still excluded from property lawsTransitions, 43(1), 8-9. Retrieved from http://www.vanierinstitute.ca/include/get.php?nodeid=3342

The Supreme Court of Canada, in its January 25, 2013 Eric v. Lola case, affirmed that common-law partners do not have the same property rights as married spouses. Thompson explains provincial variations in common-law partners’ property rights and offers suggestions for common-law partners to protect themselves.

 

Inclusion Resources (Archives)

 

Strengthening communities for Canadian children with disabilities: Discussion document

The Kids Help Foundation. (2012). Strengthening communities for Canadian children with disabilities: Discussion document. Retrieved from YUDU website: http://content.yudu.com/Library/A1xtq4/TheSandboxProject/resources/index.htm?referrerUrl=http%3A//free.yudu.com/item/details/565280/The-Sandbox-Project%3Fedit_mode%3Don

“The purpose of the ‘Strengthening Communities for Canadian Children with Disabilities’ project is to engage key stakeholders to examine the capacity for creating community environments that strengthen social development for children and youth who face significant challenges due to disability” (p. 2). This discussion paper, to be presented by Dr. Anne Snowdon at The Sandbox Project’s 2nd Annual Conference on January 19th, 2012, reports on the projects’ findings and proposes recommendations. 

 

Invisible no more: A photographic chronicle of the lives of people with intellectual disabilities

Pietropaolo, V. (2010). Invisible no more: A photographic chronicle of the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

This photography book includes a social history of intellectual disability in Canada, as well as images and words that reflect the daily lives of people with intellectual disabilities and their families. This book reflects diversity in Canada and aims to promote inclusion.

Both an English and a French version are available. This book can be retrieved through Ryerson University Library.

 

Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools – Survey results and recommendations

Inclusion BC and the Family Support Institute of BC. (2013). Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools – Survey results and recommendations. Retrieved from http://www.inclusionbc.org/sites/default/files/StopHurtingKids-Report.pdf

In July 2013, an online self-report survey was used to gain insight into BC students’ experiences with restraint and seclusion.  From the results, Inclusion BC and the Family Support Institute of BC conclude that restraint and seclusion are systemic issues with negative impacts upon the learning environment, inclusive education, and students’ emotional health and well-being.

 

Life with autism: A Japanese schoolboy opens the door

Higashida, N. (2013, August 23). Life with autism: A Japanese schoolboy opens the doorThe Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

 

Toronto early childhood and family resource listing

Early Identification and Intervention Committee of the Child and Family Network. Toronto early childhood and family resource listing. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://healthykidstoronto.ca/

“Welcome to the Toronto Early Childhood and Family Resource System: Pathway and Resource Listing, a tool to help link families to appropriate community services and programs that promote development, reduce risks, and address developmental concerns” (para. 1).

 

Integrated services for northern children

Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2011). Integrated services for northern children. Retrieved from http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/topics/specialneeds/northern.aspx

Learn how to access services for children with disabilities living in rural and remote northern Ontario.