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How can you build resilient children?

Gregory, L. (2017, October 17). How can you build resilient children? Global News. Retrieved from https://globalnews.ca

“I hope our two-year-old son grows up to be a lot of things: happy, kind, curious, empathetic, driven. Above all, I hope he is resilient. I hope he grows into an adult with the ability to adapt; to keep his footing in a world full of all kinds of challenges, both big and small... So how can I encourage this? Is resilience inherited? A product of our cumulative experiences?... We went to to Ann Masten, a professor of Child Development in the Institute of Child Development at the University of Minnesota, for some answers” (paras. 1-3).

 

How Japan raises resilient children


Lewis, K. (2017, October 5). How Japan raises resilient children. Japan Today. Retrieved from https://japantoday.com

“My Japanese-language teacher told me about a Japanese proverb that perfectly encapsulated what I wanted to teach: Nana korobi ya oki — “Fall down seven times, get up eight.” What I really wanted was for my son to learn resilience like the proverb. I didn’t want him to work only toward "success," but to keep trying, to keep pushing himself no matter the obstacles life throws in his way” (para. 3).

As I was thinking of ways to teach resilience to my son, a friend happened to say "Good luck!" before I climbed Mt Fuji. It struck me then that a vast difference between an American mindset and a Japanese one is in how we approach these big challenges in life. An American would say "Good luck!" before a big exam or presentation. In Japan, you’d say Ganbatte! – which translates roughly to ‘do your best!’” (para. 4).

 

'Resilience' to adversity determines if a child survives or thrives when bullied: New study shows the power of resilience as a protective factor

Science Daily. (2017, October 11). 'Resilience' to adversity determines if a child survives or thrives when bullied: New study shows the power of resilience as a protective factor.
Science Daily. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedaily.com

“Researchers hypothesized that resilient youth are less likely to be targets for bullying both at school and online, and that those who are targeted are less impacted by it at school. To test this concept, they used a validated biopsychosocial 10-item resilience scale to explore the relationship between resilience and experience with bullying and cyberbullying. The scale included statements like "I can deal with whatever comes my way," "I am not easily discouraged by failure," and "Having to cope with stress makes me stronger," with items assessing both the protective capacity of resilience as well as its reparative ability to restore equilibrium in the lives of youth when they face adversity” (para. 2).

 

Teaching kids to be resilient


Missio, E. (2017. July 25). Teaching kids to be resilient. CBC News. http://www.cbc.ca

The Resilience Research Centre, led by Dr. Michael Ungar of Dalhousie University, defines it this way: ‘In the context of exposure to significant adversity, resilience is both the capacity of individuals to navigate their way to the psychological, social, cultural and physical resources that sustain their well-being, and their capacity individually and collectively to negotiate for these resources to be provided in culturally meaningful ways’” (para. 7).

“Of course, preparing your kids to be independent, critical-thinking, healthily adaptable adults has always been one of the biggest components of parenthood, even before people used the ‘resiliency’ term. In our attempts to keep our kids safe (rushing to bandage skinned knees and cover sharp edges), happy (never allowing them to be bored) and comfortable (staying with them in the wake of nightmares or cutting their food for them), we’re not always doing that” (para. 8).

 

How kids learn resilience

Tough, P. (2016, June). How kids learn resilience. The Atlantic. Retrieved from https://www.theatlantic.com

“In recent years, in response to this growing crisis, a new idea (or perhaps a very old one) has arisen in the education world: Character matters. Researchers concerned with academic-achievement gaps have begun to study, with increasing interest and enthusiasm, a set of personal qualities—often referred to as noncognitive skills, or character strengths—that include resilience, conscientiousness, optimism, self-control, and grit. These capacities generally aren’t captured by our ubiquitous standardized tests, but they seem to make a big difference in the academic success of children, especially low-income children” (para. 3).

“But here’s the problem: For all our talk about noncognitive skills, nobody has yet found a reliable way to teach kids to be grittier or more resilient. And it has become clear, at the same time, that the educators who are best able to engender noncognitive abilities in their students often do so without really “teaching” these capacities the way one might teach math or reading—indeed, they often do so without ever saying a word about them in the classroom. This paradox has raised a pressing question for a new generation of researchers: Is the teaching paradigm the right one to use when it comes to helping young people develop noncognitive capacities?” (para. 5).

 

How people learn to become resilient


Konnikova, M. (2016, February 11). How people learn to become resilient. The New Yorker. Retrieved from https://www.newyorker.com

“Resilience presents a challenge for psychologists. Whether you can be said to have it or not largely depends not on any particular psychological test but on the way your life unfolds. If you are lucky enough to never experience any sort of adversity, we won’t know how resilient you are. It’s only when you’re faced with obstacles, stress, and other environmental threats that resilience, or the lack of it, emerges: Do you succumb or do you surmount?” (para. 3).


“Environmental threats can come in various guises. Some are the result of low socioeconomic status and challenging home conditions. (Those are the threats studied in Garmezy’s work.) Often, such threats**—**parents with psychological or other problems; exposure to violence or poor treatment; being a child of problematic divorce—are chronic. Other threats are acute: experiencing or witnessing a traumatic violent encounter, for example, or being in an accident. What matters is the intensity and the duration of the stressor. In the case of acute stressors, the intensity is usually high. The stress resulting from chronic adversity, Garmezy wrote, might be lower—but it ‘exerts repeated and cumulative impact on resources and adaptation and persists for many months and typically considerably longer’” (para. 4).

 

The resilient child

Healy, M. (2014, July 10). The resilient child. Psychology Today. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com

“We all want our children to become resilient: to overcome obstacles, persevere when problems arise, and bounce back from adversity. So why do some of us teach resiliency well and others have a harder time? It’s not an easy question, but certainly there’s enough research (data, experience, insight) to point the way toward raising more resilient children. In this short blog post, I am going to define resiliency and begin to share what it needs to grow mightily in your children” (para. 1).

 

Why laughter is a sign of learning

Abedon, E. (2017). Why laughter is a sign of learning. Parents. Retrieved from http://www.parents.com

“Laughter's ability to diffuse stress is just one of many reasons why it's a critical part of a child's development. Having a sense of humor plays an important role in developing self-esteem, learning to problem solve, and honing social skills, explains Louis Franzini, PhD, author of Kids Who Laugh: How to Develop Your Child's Sense of Humor (Square One). "It's one of the most desirable personality traits," he says. "And parents can, without a doubt, help foster it." Happily, it's one skill you'll reinforce with pleasure. Here's how to tickle your little guy's funny bone as he grows” (para. 2).

Father's age at conception may affect children's social skills

(2017, May 2). Father's age at conception may affect children's social skills. XPose.ie Retrieved from http://www.tv3.ie/xpose/article/fitness-and-wellbeing/238645/Fathers-age-at-conception-may-affect-childrens-social-skills

"New research claims that there may be genetic consequences for men who father children very early or very late in life, as paternal age at conception could influence an offspring's future social skills" (para. 2). 

"The team looked for differences in the developmental patterns of social skills, as well as other behaviours, including conduct and peer problems, hyperactivity, and emotionality. They also investigated whether the effects of paternal age on development were more likely attributable to genetic or environmental factors" (para. 4). 

"The researchers found that children born to very young and older fathers - below 25 and over 51 years of age, respectively - showed more pro-social behaviours in early development. However, by the time they reached adolescence, they lagged behind their peers with middle-aged fathers. These effects were specific to the social domain and were not observed in relation to maternal age" (para. 7). 

 

Children of obese parents at risk of developmental delays, says study

Pequenino, K. (20147, January 3). Children of obese parents at risk of developmental delays, says study. CNN News. Retrieved from http://www.cnn.com/2017/01/02/health/parental-obesity-child-development/

"Being overweight may impact not only your health but your future child's development as well, a new study suggests" (para. 1). 

"Children of obese parents may be at risk for developmental delays, says the study, published in the journal Pediatrics" (para. 2). 

 

Activity limits linked to health-related quality of life in kids with CP, study shows

Lopes, J. (2017, May 8). Activity limits linked to health-related quality of life in kids with CP, study showsCerebral Palsy News Today. Retrieved from https://cerebralpalsynewstoday.com/2017/05/08/activity-limits-linked-to-health-related-quality-life-in-children-with-cerebral-palsy/

"Activity limitations correlate with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with cerebral palsy (CP), new research from South Korea shows" (para. 1).

"Cerebral palsy is the most common physical disability in childhood. It affects quality of life for patients, particularly in functional outcomes, and families. A formal classification system proposed that disability should be defined in terms of activity limitation and participation restriction. In addition to measuring functional performance, these systems enable better planning of treatment goals and interpretation of therapy outcomes" (para. 3). 

 

Divorce isn't what harms kids' health, study finds, but how parents handle it

Norman, A. (2017, May 25). Divorce isn't what harms kids' health, study finds, but how parents handle it. Romper. Retrieved from https://www.romper.com/p/divorce-isnt-what-harms-kids-health-study-finds-but-how-parents-handle-it-is-60371

"Researchers at the universities of Santiago de Compostela and Vigo in Spain looked at the health of more than 400 children between the ages of 2 and 18 and observed that kids whose parents had separated were twice as likely to have a number of health woes, including stomach problems, neurological complaints, and even skin conditions. The researchers believe that psychosocial stress is a major contributing factor to the development of these conditions — which can be true for adults and kids alike. That being said, they also pointed out that it's not the divorce itself that's linked to the increase in stress, but rather, how parents handled the divorce" (para. 2). 

 

Study finds racial discrimination leads to decrease in children’s health.

Vengadesan, J. (2017, May 22). Study finds racial discrimination leads to decrease in children’s health. The Highlander. Retrieved from https://highlandernews.org/29747/study-finds-racial-discrimination-leads-decrease-childrens-health/

"UCR’s Center for Healthy Communities found that children previously exposed to racial discrimination, regardless of socioeconomic status and ethnicity, had experienced a significant decrease in overall health. Ashaunta Anderson, assistant professor at UCR’s School of Medicine, is the lead author of this study, presented on May 7 at the Pediatric Academic Society’s meeting in San Francisco. Anderson explained her study in detail in an interview with the Highlander" (para. 1). 

"“Of those household(s) that had reported excellent health, the intervention group actually had a 5.4 percent decrease in report of excellent health compared to control group children,” said Anderson. In the outcome category of ADHD, “the parents whose children experienced racial discrimination had an increase of 3.2 percent in their reports of ADHD compared to the parents who said their children did not experience racial discrimination" (para. 4). 

 

'We can't do it alone': Indigenous maternal health program aims to address inequality of health care

Whalen, J. (2017, May 25). 'We can't do it alone': Indigenous maternal health program aims to address inequality of health careCBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/indigenous-maternal-health-program-1.4130303

"Researchers in Toronto have received a $2.6 million grant to bolster Indigenous maternal and child health programs in an effort to close the gaps in health care that exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal families" (para. 1). 

"The project, which officially launches Thursday, is called "Kind Faces Sharing Places: An Action Research Project for Indigenous Families During and After Pregnancy and Birth." It aims to bring better health care to First Nations populations, some of which have infant mortality rates up to four times the national average" (para. 2)

"For many Indigenous communities, the issue is around accessibility — or accessing culturally secure and safe care," Etiebet said. She said several factors can affect a woman's ability to gain access to good maternal care, including a lack of housing, access to transportation, or mental health issues. For that reason, the program is creating a so-called "spiderweb of support" with partners like the University of Toronto's Waakebiness-Bryce Institute for Indigenous Health, Seventh Generation Midwives Toronto and Nishnawbe Homes" (para. 9). 

 

Eat, play, love: Why a child’s first 1000 days makes all of the difference

UNICEF Canada. (2017, April 18). Eat, play, love: Why a child’s first 1000 days makes all of the difference. Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.ca
 
"Children who are read to, talked to, sung to and played with are not only happier today, they will also have better cognitive capacity -- and a better chance to live a fuller, more productive life” (para. 5).
 
“Children get the best start in life when they spend their early years lovingly nurtured by engaged caregivers. Helping parents raise healthy, well-adjusted kids is a win-win situation: what's good for the kids is also good for the world. And that's why UNICEF is committed to fostering the well-being of babies and young children everywhere with low-cost, high-quality early intervention programs that help little ones thrive and yield lifelong dividends” (para. 6).

 

Longer maternity leave? Thanks but no thanks

Hideg, I. (2017, April 18). Longer maternity leave? Thanks but no thanks. Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com
 
“As a professional career woman with a passion for gender equity − as well as a mother of a two-year-old with another on the way – I’m probably the ideal target audience for the federal government’s recent decision to lengthen parental leave” (para. 1).
 
“And while I appreciate Ottawa’s attention – thanks, but no thanks. It may have been intended as “woman-friendly,” but this policy is a bad deal for gender equality” (para. 2).

 

Study looks at how autism impacts parents

Heasley, S. (2017, March 28). Study looks at how autism impacts parents. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from
https://www.disabilityscoop.com
 
“Moms and dads of kids with autism spend less time together than couples with typically-developing children, new research suggests, but that doesn’t mean they don’t support one another” (para. 1).
 
“In a study looking at the day-to-day experiences of parents of kids on the spectrum, researchers found that such couples spend an average of 21 fewer minutes per day together” (para. 2).

 

Dads talk about their experience at an OEYC

FRP Canada. (2014, April 4). Dads talk about their experience at an OEYC  [Video file]Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com
 
Fathers discuss the benefits of attending Ontario Early Years Programs and how it has enhanced their skills as fathers.

 

Parent attending family resource program

FRP Canada.  (2014, April 14). Parent attending family resource program. [Video file] Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com
 
Parents discuss how family resource programs have been instrumental in strengthening their skills as parents and caregivers, in addition to providing a network of support.

 

The Motherload

CBC Doc. Zone. (2014, December 4). The Motherload. CBC. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/doczone
 
The Motherload takes an in-depth and new look at the subject of working mothers - the current issues, challenges and triumphs that come from trying or having to do it all. And compares Canadian women’s lives to their even more troubled American counterparts – where women are struggling with work-life balance and paying a heavy price with their health” (para. 4).

 

On International Women’s Day, the need for national child care is more pressing than ever: Editorial

Toronto Star. (7, March 2016). On International Women’s Day, the need for national child care is more pressing than ever: Editorial. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from https://www.thestar.com/
 
“On this International Women’s Day it’s still conspicuously absent from the national agenda – despite royal commissions and task forces calling for such a plan for the past four and a half decades” (para. 3).
 
“Indeed, it’s been 10 years since the last serious push for such a program ended with the election of Stephen Harper’s Conservatives. They killed off an ambitious plan by the Liberals of Paul Martin to launch a $5.4-billion national child-care program” (para. 4).
 
“The result? The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has ranked Canada dead last out of 25 states for the quality and accessibility of its child care” (para. 5).

 

Close the wage gap by creating a province-wide child care program: Editorial

The Star's View. (29, August, 2016). Close the wage gap by creating a province-wide child care program: Editorial. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from https://www.thestar.com 

"Out of all the steps necessary to close the wage gap, providing licenced child-care spaces is the one that would have the biggest impact. Women who don’t have access to affordable day care take on more of the unpaid child care than men and have less time for paid work, the task force found" (para. 5). 

"Second, getting women out into the work force is important not just for women. The whole province benefits. The task force found that every dollar invested in child care adds $2.47 to the Ontario economy. Indeed, a Royal Bank study estimated personal incomes would be $168 billion higher each year in Canada if women had the same labour market opportunities as men" (para. 6). 

 

NDP bill would limit new child care funding to non-profit centres

Monsebraaten, L. (1, March 2017). NDP bill would limit new child care funding to non-profit centres. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from https://www.thestar.com/
 
“’We have 30 years of evidence and research which documents the direct link between not-for-profit centres and quality early learning and care,” said Kitchener-Waterloo MPP Catherine Fife, the NDP’s education critic’” (para. 2).
 
“’For the government to ignore this evidence moving forward would not only be ethically irresponsible but fiscally irresponsible as well,’ said Fife. Debate on the bill begins in the legislature Thursday” (para. 3).

 

Increase funding for a national child care program: Editorial

Star Editorial Board. (16, March 2017). Increase funding for a national child care program: EditorialThe Toronto Star. Retrieved from https://www.thestar.com/
 
“The Trudeau government must change course if it is to create the “affordable, high-quality, flexible and fully inclusive child care” program that the Liberals promised in the 2015 election campaign. It is, after all, a commitment that study after study has shown would improve the economic well-being of families, boost the country’s economy, and enhance the health of children” (para. 4).
 
“The problem isn’t with the initial promise of $500 million. That’s enough to get started, experts agree. But it must be ramped up considerably each year over the next decade to build the necessary infrastructure, increase the number of child care spaces each year, and educate and hire enough teachers” (para. 5).

 

Federal budget money for child care is a good first step but not nearly enough, advocates say

Monsebraaten, L. (22, March 2017). Federal budget money for child care is a good first step but not nearly enough, advocates say. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from https://www.thestar.com/

"The $7 billion earmarked in the budget for child care includes $500 million already allocated for 2017-18 to kick-start a national program with the provinces and territories based on the principles of affordability, accessibility, flexibility and inclusiveness" (para. 7). 

"Child-care advocates welcomed the Trudeau government’s commitment to long-term funding, but they said money available in the first five years is not enough to fund urgently-needed improvements in access, affordability and quality" (para. 9). 

 

Child care, maternity leave benefits to receive billions in Canada's budget

The Canadian Press. (22, March 2017). Child care, maternity leave benefits to receive billions in Canada's budget. The Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/

"The federal government plans to spend $7 billion over the next decade to help ease the burden of child care costs, part of a slew of new long-term spending targeting families" (para. 1). 

"The details outlined in Wednesday's federal budget estimated that child care spending could create 40,000 new, subsidized daycare spaces countrywide over the next three years, representing a bump of less than 10 per cent in the overall number of spaces, although it's unclear how the Liberals came to that figure" (para. 2). 

"The budget said the money could also help thousands of parents more easily enter the labour force, particularly women, much as it did in Quebec after that province introduced a subsidized daycare system" (para. 3). 

 

Petition call for B.C. Family Day date change to align with other provinces

The Canadian Press. (2017, February 14). Petition call for B.C. Family Day date change to align with other provincesCTV News. Retrieved from http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/petition-calls-for-b-c-family-day-date-change-to-align-with-other-provinces-1.3283050

"A petition on Change.org is calling for B.C. to align its Family Day holiday with six other provinces, including Alberta and Ontario, which hold it a week later on the third Monday of February" (para. 1). 

 

In their words: How children are affected by gender issues

Conant, E. (n.d). In their words: How children are affected by gender issues. National Geographic. Retrieved from http://www.nationalgeographic.com

“To get kids’ perspectives, National Geographic fanned out into 80 homes over four continents. From the slums of Rio de Janeiro to the high-rises of Beijing, we posed the same questions to a diverse cast of nine-year-olds. Being nine, they didn’t mince their words” (para. 5).

“Many readily admitted that it can be hard—frustrating, confusing, lonely—to fit into the communities they call home and the roles they’re expected to play. Others are thriving as they break down gender barriers” (para. 6).

 

Wynne aims to remove barriers for students with disabilities

Gordon, A. (2016, December 5). Wynne aims to remove barriers for students with disabilities. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/12/05/wynne-aims-to-remove-barriers-for-students-with-disabilities.html
 
“The province will develop an education accessibility standard to remove barriers that students with disabilities face in classrooms, curriculum and on school premises, Premier Kathleen Wynne said Monday” (para. 1).

 

UN Panel calls for inclusive education

Heasley, S. (2016, September 7). UN Panel calls for inclusive education. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com/2016/09/07/un-panel-inclusive-education/22712/

 “Governments must work together with people who have disabilities and other stakeholders to ensure that schooling is not just integrated, but actually inclusive” (para. 2).

 ““Enabling inclusive education requires an in-depth transformation of education systems in legislation, policy and the way education is financed, administered, designed, taught and monitored. We hope our general comment will guide and aid states toward achieving this goal,” said Maria Soledad Cisternas Reyes, chair of the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities” (para. 8).

 

Phone app aids early learning for poor families, say experts

Flanagan, P. (2016, November 18). Phone app aids early learning for poor families, say experts. The Essential Daily Briefing. Retrieved from https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/education/phone-app-aids-early-learning-poor-families-say-experts/ 

"A phone app designed for disadvantaged pre-school children has been found to improve concentration and problem-solving by toddlers, according to Oxford University experts" (para. 1). 

"Parents taking part in the trial used the app for 18 weeks and reported improvements in their children’s “cognitive self-regulation”, covering concentration and their willingness to complete difficult tasks, said the researchers" (para. 2). 

 

Most Manitobans agree universal child care priority for PCs: poll

CBC News. (2016, October 25). Most Manitobans agree universal child care priority for PCs: poll. CTV News Manitoba. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca

“A full three-quarters of Manitobans say a universal child care system should be a priority for the province, according to a new Probe Research poll commissioned by the Manitoba Child Care Association” (para. 1).

“The study found that most respondents — 58 per cent — agreed they were willing to pay a little more in taxes to make universal child care possible. The poll defined universal child care as a system ‘where every child who needs a space gets one’” (para. 2).

 

Gretsky calls on Wynne to ensure child-care workers earn more money

Pearson, C. (2016, October 26). Gretsky calls on Wynne to ensure child-care workers earn more money. Windsor Star. Retrieved from http://windsorstar.com

“The NDP education critic on Wednesday called on Premier Kathleen Wynne to commit to a system that provides affordable child care while paying decent wages to the professionals taking care of Ontario children” (para. 1)

"'Parents who couldn’t afford child care before this government’s throne speech are no better off today,' [Windsor West MPP Lisa Gretsky] said during Question Period in the legislature. 'Working conditions in the child-care sector are reaching a tipping point where over a quarter of our dedicated professionals are looking for another job'” (para. 2).

 

Calls for Ontario to improve the child care system

CTV Windsor. (2016, October 27). Calls for Ontario to improve the child care systemCTV News. Retrieved from http://windsor.ctvnews.ca
 
“The Ontario Coalition for Better Child Care (OCBCC) and its partners presented a petition, with thousands of names on it, in the legislature on Wednesday, to mark Child Care Worker and Early Childhood Educator Appreciation Day” (para. 2).

Executive Director of the OCBCC, Carolyn Ferns says 'we need an approach that develops a real child care system. Not just a space expansion, but affordability for parents and decent work for educators'” (para. 5).

 

 

Are the kids all right? Ontario’s child advocate says we just don’t know

Kitts, D. (2016, August 25). Are the kids all right? Ontario’s child advocate says we just don’t knowTVO. Retrieved from http://tvo.org/

TVO.org spoke to Irwin Elman, Ontario’s first provincial advocate for children and youth “about his work, what’s changed since he took up the role in 2008 and why he still thinks Ontario is falling far short at properly caring for vulnerable children” (para. 1).

 

Ontario parents worry about special education support

Gordon, A., & Rushowy, K. (2016, September 5). Ontario parents worry about special education supportThe Toronto Star. Retrieved from https://www.thestar.com/

“Recent changes to the province’s autism services for children will result in an influx of students coming to school who need additional supports” (para. 3).

“But there’s a long way to go before those Ontario students get the help they are entitled to, whether it’s one-on-one educational assistants or more teachers trained to use the principles of applied behaviour analysis (ABA) that are effective for many children on the autism spectrum and others” (para. 4).

 

School boards must provide before and after school care starting Sept. 2017

Bueckert, K. (2016, September 6). School boards must provide before and after school care starting Sept. 2017CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/

“Starting in September 2017, schools will have to provide before and after school care for students up to the age of 12, where there is sufficient demand” (para. 1).

“According to Associate Minister of Education Indira Naidoo-Harris “this will also include access to more recreational and skill building programs to get kids more active and engaged," Naidoo-Harris said in an emailed statement to the CBC. "We're making these changes to expand both access and options for before and after care for children across the province and to make everyday life easier for families” (para. 3).

 

Ontario creating 100,000 more licensed child care spaces

Hunter, M. (2016, September 23). Ontario creating 100,000 more licensed child care spaces[News Release]. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario website https://news.ontario.ca/edu/en/2016/09/ontario-creating-100000-more-licensed-child-care-spaces.html

“Within the next five years, Ontario will help to create another 100,000 new, licensed child care spaces so that more families in Toronto can find quality, affordable care” (para. 1).

“Today's announcement reaffirms the commitment the government made in the recent Speech from the Throne. Ontario will help to create the new, licensed child care spaces for infants, toddlers and preschoolers within the next five years, with the first spaces opening in 2017” (para. 2).

 

Change to Ontario cabinet increases focus on child care

Office of the Premier. (2016, August 24). Change to Ontario cabinet increases focus on child care. Retrieved from Government of Ontario website https://news.ontario.ca/opo/en/2016/08/change-to-ontario-cabinet-increases-focus-on-child-care.html

"Premier Kathleen Wynne today announced a change to her cabinet that will help strengthen supports for parents and give children the best possible start in life" (para. 1). 

"Indira Naidoo-Harris, MPP for Halton, becomes Associate Minister of Education (Early Years and Child Care). She will lead the government's efforts, in partnership with the Minister of Education, to build a high-quality, accessible and affordable early years and child care system that supports choice and flexibility for parents and promotes healthy development for children" (para. 2). 

 

Schools told not to skimp on behavior supports

Diament, M. (2016, August 9). Schools told not to skimp on behavior supports. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"Frequent discipline may be a sign that kids with disabilities are not receiving a free appropriate public education, according to new federal guidance reminding schools of their obligations to provide behavior supports" (para. 1). 

 

Early childhood education gets push from $1 billion federal investment

Heim, J. (2016, August 1). Early childhood education gets push from $1 billion federal investment. The Washington Post. Retrieved from https://www.washingtonpost.com

"Early education across the United States is a mishmash of day care, Head Start and preschool programs with a wide range of quality and effectiveness. But a federally sponsored program in 20 states has been effective at giving those states a way to assess and quantify early-childhood education options and make that information available to parents, educators and legislators, according to a study the U.S. Education Department plans to release Monday" (para. 1). 

 

Study: Younger siblings face higher autism risk

Heasley, S. (2016, August 9). Study: Younger siblings face higher autism riskDisability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com/2016/08/09/study-siblings-autism-risk/22594/ 

"Younger siblings of those with autism are over a dozen times more likely than other kids to have the developmental disorder too, a new study suggests" (para. 1). 

"The risk did not appear to be affected by a child’s race or whether they were born early, at term or late. However, gender did seem to make a difference, according to findings published online this month in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics" (para. 2). 

 

No Child Left Behind has been unsuccessful, says bipartisan report

Carpentier, M. (2016, August 9). No Child Left Behind has been unsuccessful, says bipartisan reportThe Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/

"It’s been almost 15 years since the US Congress passed the much-derided No Child Left Behind (NCLB) education reform bill in an effort to improve American students’ international competitiveness in reading and math, which had been falling for quite some time" (para. 1). 

"On Tuesday, a bipartisan group of legislators from the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL) declared in a new report that the reform efforts of states in the wake of NCLB had been unsuccessful" (para. 2). 

 

A high-rise is not a home for children, the experts say

Goleman, D. (1987, September 10). A high-rise is not a home for children, the experts say. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

“Many experts in child development and urban psychology say that life in a high-rise apartment can present hurdles to a toddler's psychological growth, particularly to the young child's need to develop a sense of autonomy” (para. 4).

 

Successful high rise means building gardens and streets in the sky, too

Oldfield, p. (2013, September 30). Successful high rise means building gardens and streets in the sky, too. The Guardian. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/
 
“Despite this apparent popularity, high-rise living is still unappealing to many, and in particular to families with children who see the lack of social-communal spaces and the distance between the flat and the street as a physical and psychological barrier” (para. 2).

“While future UK housing will likely be multi-typological, with terraced, low-rise and strategically located high-rise all necessary, tall buildings can never fulfill their potential until we make living at height appealing to families with children. And this means designing gardens, terraces and streets in the sky (para. 8).

 

Vertical living kids

Lashkari, C. (2010, March 30). Vertical living kids. Child Health News. Retrieved from http://www.news-medical.net

University of Melbourne Associate Professor Carolyn Whitzman, "has recently conducted a study called “Vertical living kids” which proves that children living in high rises are not as independent as those living in the suburbs. They are far more dependent on parental supervision when planning outings and excursions” (para. 1).

 

Growing up: Toronto tackles vertical living for children

Simcoe, L. (2016, February 11). Growing up: Toronto tackles vertical living for childrenMetro News. Retrieved from http://www.metronews.ca

“The city is embarking on a lofty plan to make its vertical communities more livable for children and families” (para. 1).

“According to the 2011 census, nearly a third of Toronto families live in mid- or high-rise buildings. However, the same data shows that in the downtown core, only 0.8 per cent of units built in the first decade of the 2000s contained three or more bedrooms” (para. 2).

 

The WFO President's Message for the 2016 International Day of Families

Kusztra, D. (2016, May 15). The WFO President's Message for the 2016 International Day of Families. World Family Organization. Retrieved from http://www.worldfamilyorganization.org

The President of The World Family Organization, Deisi Kusztra's provided a message for the 2016 International Day of the Families. He summarized by stating "in this year celebrations activities let's reaffirm our commitments to advocate for family-­friendly policy formulation and for family-friendly services delivery, especially at the local level, and in a very decisive way to include families in the sustainable development goals implementation processes" (para. 6). 

 

Statement by the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development on the International Day of Families

Employment and Social Development Canada. (2016, May 13). Statement by the Minister of Families, Children and Social Development on the International Day of Families. [News Release]. Retrieved from http://news.gc.ca


The Honourable Jean-Yves Duclos, Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, made a statement regarding the International Day of Families. He stated: “In honour of this year’s International Day of Families, I would like to take this opportunity to highlight that supporting Canadians and their families is our top priority" (para. 2). 

 

Your infant's vision development

Heiting, G. (2016, May). Your infant's vision development. All About Vision. Retrieved from http://www.allaboutvision.com/parents/infants.htm

"One of the greatest moments when having a child is the first time your newborn daughter or son opens their eyes and makes eye contact with you. But don't be concerned if that doesn't happen right away" (para. 1). 

 

Talking about national child and youth mental health day

UNICEF Canda. (2016, May 9). Talking about national child and youth mental health day. Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.ca

“Mental health awareness is on the rise. People across Canada are beginning to understand just how serious mental health concerns and associated stigma can be. Yet few people understand the depth or breadth of the mental health concerns of children and youth” (para. 1).

 

Britain’s Cameron proposes state-backed parenting classes

Paquette, D. (2016, January 16). Britain’s Cameron proposes state-backed parenting classes. Ames Tribute. Retrieved from http://amestrib.com

“British Prime Minister David Cameron thinks parents need government-approved advice on raising kids. British parents aren’t exactly thrilled with this recent proclamation” (para. 1). 

 

Two weeks paternity leave for fathers to get formal approval

O’Connor, N. (2016, January 1). Two weeks paternity leave for fathers to get formal approvalIndependent.ie. Retrieved from http://www.independent.ie

“The widely welcomed move, which was announced in the Budget, will see fathers for the first time take paid leave from work after the birth of their child” (para. 1).

“The father will be able to avail of the two weeks immediately after birth, or else any period up until the child reaches 26 weeks” (para. 2). 

 

Ontario hiring more mental health workers for children and youth

Ontario Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2016, January 22). Ontario hiring more mental health workers for children and youth. Retrieved from https://news.ontario.ca/mcys/en/2016/01/ontario-hiring-more-mental-health-workers-for-children-and-youth.html?utm_source=ondemand&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=p

“Ontario is investing $6 million in local mental health services to help an estimated additional 4,000 children and youth, and their families each year” (para. 1).

“Approximately one in five children and youth in Ontario experience a mental health challenge. About 70 per cent of mental health challenges have their onset in childhood or youth. Early identification and intervention can lead to improved achievement in school and better health outcomes in life” (para. 2). 

 

Feds boost spending on special ed, disability programs

Diament, M. (2016, January 19). Feds boost spending on special ed, disability programsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com

“With funding gains for special education, housing and other disability programs, advocates say the federal government’s latest budget is a step in the right direction” (para. 1).

“. . . funding to states under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for school-age children is up $415 million” (para. 7).

 

Reports: Inclusion on rise in nation’s schools

Heasley, S. (2016, February 2). Reports: Inclusion on rise in nation’s schools. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com

“A growing number of students with disabilities are spending most of the day in regular education classrooms alongside their typically-developing peers, according to new federal statistics” (para. 1). 

 “As of 2013, more than 6 in 10 school-age students served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act spent at least 80 percent of their day in regular classrooms. By contrast, roughly half of students with disabilities met that threshold in 2004” (para. 2). 

 

Autism monitor developed at UBC one of six start-up ideas to join Innovation Hub

Shore, R. (2016, January 18). Autism monitor developed at UBC one of six start-up ideas to join Innovation Hub. The Vancouver Sun. Retrieved from http://www.vancouversun.com

“A new wearable sensor system developed at the University of B.C. could help children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and their caregivers head off debilitating anxiety attacks” (para. 1)

 

Toronto's Catholic board considers cutting educational assistants

Robinson, M. (2016, February 16). Toronto's Catholic board considers cutting educational assistants. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from www.thestar.com

"Toronto’s Catholic school board is considering eliminating more than 100 education assistants to balance the budget by August 2019, which critics claim is a cross to be borne by the board’s most vulnerable learners" (para. 1).

 

Saskatchewan still without poverty reduction strategy

Fraser, D. (2016, January 12). Saskatchewan still without poverty reduction strategy. Regina Leader-Post. Retrieved from http://leaderpost.com

“In August, an 11-member advisory committee struck by the province released its recommendations on how to reduce poverty in Saskatchewan” (para. 1).

“Five months later, a strategy is still not in place” (para. 3).

 

Province expecting influx of refugee children under the age of 12

Fowler, S. (2016, January 5). Province expecting influx of refugee children under the age of 12. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca

“The Department of Education and Early Childhood Development cannot confirm how many Syrian refugee children will be enrolled in New Brunswick's schools, but Tammy Strong, the department's diversity and respect co-ordinator, says about 40 per cent of those expected to arrive in the province will be under the age of 12” (para. 1).

 

How new tools meant to help special education students take standardized tests actually made them harder

Udesky, L. (2015, December 21). How new tools meant to help special education students take standardized tests actually made them harder. The Hechinger Report. Retrieved from http://hechingerreport.org

Udesky reports that changes made to Common Core tests created new challenges for children with and without disabilities. “Maureen O’Leary Burness, who served until recently as the co-executive director of the Statewide Special Education Task Force, said last spring’s test might not have yielded accurate scores. In its first year, she said, it was ‘a test of the test’” (para. 24).

 

Parents demand more teacher training and stability for autistic children

Plante, C. (2015, December 21). Parents demand more teacher training and stability for autistic childrenMontreal Gazette. Retrieved from http://montrealgazette.com

 “Parents of autistic and special needs children in the province say they will not wait until Quebec holds a forum sometime in 2016 to make their demands known” (byline).

 

Schools cited for widespread ADA violations

Heasley, S. (2016, January 5). Schools cited for widespread ADA violationsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com

 “Federal officials are demanding action after an investigation revealed that the vast majority of elementary schools in the nation’s largest district are inaccessible to students with disabilities” (para. 1).

 

Liberal government commits to repealing so-called ‘spanking law'

Smith, J. (2015, December 21). Liberal government commits to repealing so-called ‘spanking law'. Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

“The Liberal government plans to repeal a law that protects parents who include spanking in their disciplinary toolkits, which child advocates say would send a strong message that physical punishment — even when well-intentioned — is harmful to children” (para. 1).

“A spokesman for Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould confirmed Monday the government is including the repeal of Section 43 of the Criminal Code of Canada, which protects parents — and to a lesser extent, schoolteachers — who use ‘reasonable’ physical force against children as part of its greater pledge to implement all 94 recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission” (para. 3).

 

Baby kits of support for new parents tested in Alberta

White, R. (2016, January 6). Baby kits of support for new parents tested in Alberta. CTV News Calgary. Retrieved from http://calgary.ctvnews.ca

“A  Finnish tradition for ensuring expectant parents have some of the necessities required for raising a healthy first child has made its way to Canada as part of a project headed by researchers at the University of Calgary” (para. 1).

 

Where new dads are encouraged to take months off work

Rangecroft, A. (2016, January 6). Where new dads are encouraged to take months off workBBC News. Retrieved from http://www.bbc.com

“In some countries the idea of paternity leave - when a father takes time off work to stay at home with a new child - has yet to take hold. In Sweden, which has been encouraging fathers to take paternity leave since 1974, there is now a new incentive for them to spend a full three months at home” (para. 1).

 

Signs of a truce in the mommy wars

Miller, C. (2015, December 10). Signs of a truce in the mommy wars. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/

“. . . Americans’ attitudes about working parents — mothers as caregivers, fathers as breadwinners — have been remarkably slow to change” (para. 1).

“New research, though, reveals a shift in attitudes. . . .The data uncover a sharply changing definition of fatherhood” (para. 2.). 

 

Most New York City elementary schools are violating disabilities act, investigation finds

Weiser, B. (2015, December 21). Most New York City elementary schools are violating disabilities act, investigation finds. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/

“A two-year federal investigation has concluded that 83 percent of New York City’s public elementary schools are not ‘fully accessible’ to children with disabilities, in violation of the Americans With Disabilities Act” (para. 1). 

 

Disability awareness effort asks people to ‘just say hi’

Diament, M. (2015, December 8). Disability awareness effort asks people to ‘just say hi’. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“Apple’s Siri and CEO Tim Cook are the latest to sign on for a star-studded campaign encouraging people to lose their fear of interacting with those who have disabilities” (para. 1).

“Through a series of short videos, the awareness campaign from the Cerebral Palsy Foundation encourages people to ‘Just Say Hi’ ” (para. 2). 

 

Education law tightens testing cap for students with disabilities

Diament, M. (2015, December 10). Education law tightens testing cap for students with disabilities. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“President Barack Obama signed the Every Student Succeeds Act on Thursday, a rewrite of the nation’s primary education law previously known as No Child Left Behind” (para. 2).       

“[A]dvocates say they expect the changes are a step in the right direction for students with disabilities” (para. 1).

 

Centre for child development in Surrey, B.C., opens new spaces for special needs kids

CBC News. (2015, December 4). Centre for child development in Surrey, B.C., opens new spaces for special needs kids. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/

“B.C. Minister of Children and Family Development, Stephanie Cadieux, helped cut the ribbon on 37 new childcare spaces in Surrey for kids with special needs” (para. 1). 

 

Autism funding from B.C. government aimed at infants and toddlers

The Early Edition, CBC News. (2015, December 8). Autism funding from B.C. government aimed at infants and toddlers. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/

“The B.C. government announced Monday $3 million of funding for a new initiative on parent coaching intervention for infants and toddlers showing early signs of autism” (para. 1). 

 

Universal Child Care Benefit: What you need to know about these new payments

Zilio, M. (2015, July 19). Universal Child Care Benefit: What you need to know about these new paymentsCTV news. Retrieved from http://www.ctvnews.ca

“Starting Monday, Canadian families with children under 18 can expect a hefty cheque to arrive in their mailboxes or bank account” (para. 1). Zilio explains who qualifies for the Universal Child Care Benefit [UCCB], how the UCCB can be accessed, when to expect payments, and the politics behind the UCCB.

 

NAEP scores for students with disabilities show wide achievement gap [Web log comment]

Samuels, C. (2015, October 29). NAEP scores for students with disabilities show wide achievement gap [Web log comment]Retrieved from http://blogs.edweek.org

The math and reading scores for students with disabilities on the National Assessment of Educational Progress showed little movement between 2015 and the last time the test was administered two years ago” (para. 1).

Considering the NAEP score decreases seen for the overall student population, holding steady could be seen as a neutral or even positive result, especially because more students with disabilities took the test this year. Exclusion rates from the test, also known as the ‘nation's report card,’ have dropped significantly over the past two test administrations” (para. 2).

 

‘Sesame Street’ unveils character with Autism

Diament, M. (2015, October 21). ‘Sesame Street’ unveils character with AutismDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/10/21/sesame-street-character-autism/20891/

“The makers of ‘Sesame Street’ say Elmo, Abby Cadabby and Grover are getting a new friend with autism as part of an effort to reduce stigma and help those on the spectrum learn life skills” (para. 1).

“Sesame Workshop said Wednesday that it is introducing a new character named Julia, a preschool girl with autism who ‘does things a little differently when playing with her friends’” (para. 2).

 

Disabilities no barrier at all-inclusive preschools

Pignolet, J. (2015, October 9). Disabilities no barrier at all-inclusive preschoolsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/10/09/disabilities-preschools/20863/

“The school [Play Do Learn], part of nonprofit agency SRVS that operates out of Independent Presbyterian Church, integrates children with and without varying levels of disabilities at the preschool level starting at age 15 months. The practice, known as all-inclusive preschool, is a concept the U.S. Department of Education said in a policy statement last month should be more prevalent in both public and private education settings” (para. 6).

 

For ‘Sesame Street’, character on the spectrum years in the making

Resmovits, J. (2015, October 26). For ‘Sesame Street’, character on the spectrum years in the makingDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Meet Julia. As you might have heard, she’s Sesame Street’s newest muppet. She has bright orange hair, big green eyes and sometimes takes a long time to answer questions. She’s [sic] has autism” (para. 1).

 

Stressed, tired, rushed: A portrait of the modern family

Miller, C. (2015, November 4). Stressed, tired, rushed: A portrait of the modern familyThe New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

“Children are much more likely than not to grow up in a household in which their parents work, and in nearly half of all two-parent families today, both parents work full time, a sharp increase from previous decades” (para. 1).

 

Work-life balance poses challenges regardless of wealth

Sullivan, P. (2015, October 9). Work-life balance poses challenges regardless of wealthThe New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

“If there is a riddle that affluent, working parents can’t seem to solve, it is how to balance the many interests competing for their time: work, children, spouses, their own needs and wants. Yes, they have more money than most people struggling to get by in similar situations, but any help or financial freedom they have is dependent on their continuing to work and set priorities” (para. 5).

 

Study: No downside to eliminating Asperger’s label

Diament, M. (2015, November 5). Study: No downside to eliminating Asperger’s labelDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“When Asperger’s syndrome was dropped from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, the change prompted concerns about increased stigma, but a new study finds those fears may be unfounded” (para. 1).

 

Following hiatus, federal autism panel returns

Diament, M. (2015, October 30). Following hiatus, federal autism panel returns. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said this week that the Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee will meet Nov. 17 with new faces comprising more than half of the 15-member panel” (para. 2).

 

Bedford’s newest special education classrooms bring students back to the district

Richard, J. (2015, October 27). Bedford’s newest special education classrooms bring students back to the districtWicked Local Bedford. Retrieved from http://bedford.wickedlocal.com

“As the numbers of children diagnosed with an autism-spectrum disorder increase, local schools look for ways to bring these students the support they need in-district” (para. 1).

 

TV featuring fewer characters with disabilities

Heasley, S. (2015, October 28). TV featuring fewer characters with disabilitiesDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“For the first time in two years, the number of characters with disabilities on prime-time television is on the decline, a new report finds” (para. 1).

“There are just eight regularly appearing characters with disabilities expected this year on scripted prime-time programs on ABC, CBS, The CW, Fox and NBC, representing 0.9 percent of all characters” (para. 2).

 

Supreme Court asked to weigh in on service dog case

Diament, M. (2015, October 30). Supreme Court asked to weigh in on service dog caseDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“A court case pitting a girl with cerebral palsy against school officials who tried to deny her access to her service dog may be headed to the U.S. Supreme Court” (para. 1).

 

Parents of kids with disabilities buck divorce trend

Diament, M. (2015, November 3). Parents of kids with disabilities buck divorce trendDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Parents of those with developmental disabilities are no more likely to divorce than other moms and dads, new research suggests, but different factors are at play” (para. 1).

 

Laws mandate education for would-be parents about Down syndrome

Togneri, C. (2015, September 8). Laws mandate education for would-be parents about Down syndromeDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Last August, former Gov. Tom Corbett signed a bill that requires medical officials to provide accurate, up-to-date information to parents the moment a practitioner makes a Down syndrome diagnosis, usually during a prenatal exam. The Prenatal Education Act is known as ‘Chloe’s Law’” (para. 4).

 

Thunder Bay District Social Services announces changes to child care special needs model

NNL Staff. (2015, September 4). Thunder Bay District Social Services announces changes to child care special needs model.Net News Ledger. Retrieved from http://www.netnewsledger.com

“The special needs resource program for child care is intended to support children with unique needs within licensed child care programs. This enhanced program will employ a team of Resource Teachers trained in recommended inclusive practices in early childhood education to provide information, resources, and supports to children, families and staff” (para. 1).

 

Obama administration makes push for preschool inclusion

Diament, M. (2015, September 15). Obama administration makes push for preschool inclusionDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Federal officials say that all children with disabilities should be able to attend preschool alongside their typically-developing peers” (para. 1).

 

Four new early years centres officially open

Government of Nova Scotia. (2015). Four new early years centres officially open. Retrieved from http://novascotia.ca/

“Four communities now have access to increased supports for young children with the official opening of four new early years centres” (para. 1). 

“The expansion means there is now an early years centre in every school board in the province” (para. 2).

 

N.W.T. gov’t announces 3 early childhood development pilot projects

CBC News. (2015, September 23). N.W.T. gov’t announces 3 early childhood development pilot projects. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca

“The Northwest Territories government is implementing pilot projects across the territory, aiming to help address gaps in early childhood development in small communities” (para. 1).

 

For the Children’s sake, put down that smartphone

Neighmond, P. (2015, April 21). For the Children’s sake, put down that smartphoneNational Public Radio. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org

“It's not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling” (para. 1).

 

Child poverty widespread in Toronto-area ridings

Monsebraaten, L. (2015, October 7). Child poverty widespread in Toronto-area ridingsThe Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

“A whopping 30 federal ridings in the GTA have child poverty rates above the national average of 19 per cent, according to a new report” (para. 1).

 

Long-delayed caregiver wage protections to take effect

Diament, M. (2015, October 7). Long-delayed caregiver wage protections to take effect. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“The U.S. Supreme Court has paved the way for an Obama administration rule mandating minimum wage and overtime for in-home caregivers assisting those with disabilities to be implemented” (para. 1).

 

Play’s the thing: What mums and dads do differently

Wayman, S. (2015, July 21). Play’s the thing: What mums and dads do differentlyIrish Times. Retrieved from http://www.irishtimes.com

“The differences fathers and mothers bring to the parenting equation may be a sensitive topic in our era of equality, but researchers at Trinity College Dublin are currently looking very closely at the impact of gender on parent-toddler interactions” (para. 1).

 

Schools warned on speech services for kids with autism

Diament, M. (2015, July 28). Schools warned on speech services for kids with autismDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Federal education officials are reminding schools not to skimp on needed speech and language services for children with autism” (para. 1). 

 

Best country for new dads: Why Sweden tops the list [Video]

Khoo, I. (2015, July 23). Best country for new dads: Why Sweden tops the list [Video]The Huffington Post Canada. Retrieved from www.huffingtonpost.ca

Scott Behson, author of The Working Dad’s Survival Guide and Gabriel Arana, senior editor at the Huffington Post, explain why Sweden has been ranked the best country for new dads.

 

Special education training efforts to get millions

Heasley, S. (2015, August 17). Special education training efforts to get millions. Disability scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“The U.S. Department of Education said it will grant $14 million to support parent training and information centers in 28 states and two U.S. territories over the next five years” (para. 2).

 

Netflix latest U.S. company to boost maternal, paternal benefits

 Kestler-D’Amours, J. (2015, August 5). Netflix latest U.S. company to boost maternal, paternal benefits.  The Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

“Netflix is offering its employees unlimited maternal and paternal leave in the first year after they become parents, a policy that a leading U.S. women and family rights group says is “incredibly generous relative to U.S. standards” (para. 1). 

 

The complicated problem of race and special education

Greenhouse, J. (2015, July 28). The complicated problem of race and special education. The Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

“A study released last month by the American Educational Research Association found that minority students are underrepresented in special education services” (para.1). 

 

Kids with autism can read emotions through body language

Fessenden, M. (2015, August 3). Kids with autism can read emotions through body languageSmithsonian. Retrieved from http://www.smithsonianmag.com

“People with autism face a host of difficulties in a society that doesn’t always accommodate them and stereotypes that even undermine experts’ views on the disorder. Due to the social struggles that accompany autism, there’s a misconception that people with it lack empathy — that is, they can’t understand others’ thoughts and feelings. A new study, like others before it, offers evidence to the contrary” (para. 1). 

 

Pediatrics group to recommend reading aloud to children from birth

Rich, M. (2015, June 24). Pediatrics group to recommend reading aloud to children from birth. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

“With the increased recognition that an important part of brain development occurs within the first three years of a child’s life, and that reading to children enhances vocabulary and other important communication skills, the [American Academy of Pediatrics], which represents 62,000 pediatricians across the [United States], is asking its members to become powerful advocates for reading aloud, every time a baby visits the doctor” (para. 2).

 

Anticipation high ahead of special ed camera mandate

Ayala, E.-M. (2015, August 6). Anticipation high ahead of special ed camera mandate. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Texas special education advocates say a new law requiring video cameras in some classrooms will protect those students most at risk of being abused” (para.1).

 

Sydney family fears discrimination if deported to Bangladesh

McCallum, N. (2015, July 9). Sydney family fears discrimination if deported to Bangladesh9News. Retrieved from http://www.9news.com

“The immigration department has ordered four-year-old Australian-born Fayyed Hoque and his family to leave the country because his autism has been deemed too burdensome for taxpayers” (para. 2). 

 

Early intervention programs to get more staff, money

CBC News. (2015, January 20). Early intervention programs to get more staff, moneyCBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca

"The Nova Scotia government is promising to shorten wait times for families needing help with pre-schoolers struggling with a mental, physical or emotional development problems [sic]" (para. 1).

 

Report on N.B. poverty plan shows increase in deep poverty

Bissett, K. (2015). Report on N.B. poverty plan shows increase in deep poverty. CTV News Atlantic. Retrieved from http://atlantic.ctvnews.ca/report-on-n-b-poverty-plan-shows-increase-in-deep-poverty-1.2439812

This article shares statistics comparing poverty in 2009 and 2014. Different stakeholders share their perspectives on New Brunswick’s poverty plan.

 

Analysis ranks best states for disability services

Diament, M. (2015, July 16). Analysis ranks best states for disability services. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"A diverse group of states spanning the nation came out on top in an annual ranking of services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

The analysis released Thursday by United Cerebral Palsy looks at Medicaid services offered across the 50 states and the District of Columbia” (para. 1-2). 

 

Feds: Most states failing to meet special ed obligations

Diament, M. (2015, July 14). Feds: Most states failing to meet special ed obligations. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Federal officials indicate that less than half of states are meeting their obligations under special education law.

The U.S. Department of Education says that just 19 states qualified for the ‘meets requirements’ designation for the 2013-2014 school year. The rest of states were classified as ‘needs assistance’ or ‘needs intervention’” (para. 1-2).

 

Children’s brains changed by severe family violence, royal commission hears

Florance, L. (2015, July14). Children’s brains changed by severe family violence, royal commission hears. ABC News. Retrieved from http://www.abc.net.au

“Social worker and family therapist Robyn Miller said children literally sensed fear through skin contact with parents.

‘Children and very young babies can sense the fear in their parent and that has a profound impact ... the relationship between the baby and the child's primary carer, usually the mother, is critical to that child's development,’ she said” (para. 1-2). 

 

Majority of Manitoba parents both work: Third-highest proportion in Canada, statistics show

Prest, A. (2015, June 25). Majority of Manitoba parents both work: Third-highest proportion in Canada, statistics show. Winnipeg Free Press. Retrieved from http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

“Manitoba has the third-highest proportion of families with two working parents at 70.7 per cent, Statistics Canada reports” (para. 1). 

 

Study finds “significant” spike in number of stay-at-home dads in Canada: ‘Men had to step up’

Boesveld, S. (2015, June 25). Study finds “significant” spike in number of stay-at-home dads in Canada: ‘Men had to step up’. National Post. Retrieved from http://news.nationalpost.com

“In more than one in 10 coupled Canadian families in which one parent stays home, dad is the one doing the laundry, cooking and child care, Statistics Canada reported Wednesday in a snapshot that reveals just how much the face of work and family life has changed in recent decades” (para. 1). 

 

Brain imaging shows how children inherit their parents’ anxiety

Kalin, N. (2015, July 6). Brain imaging shows how children inherit their parents’ anxiety. University of Wisconsin-Madison News.Retrieved from http://www.news.wisc.edu/23879

“[A] new study in an extended family of monkeys provides important insights into how the risk of developing anxiety and depression is passed from parents to children” (para. 1).

“The study from the Department of Psychiatry and the Health Emotions Research Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows how an over-active brain circuit involving three brain areas inherited from generation to generation may set the stage for developing anxiety and depressive disorders” (para. 3). 

 

Opinion: Making family and work … work

Pomeroy, E. (2015, June 29). Opinion: Making family and work … work. Montreal Gazette. Retrieved from http://montrealgazette.com/

“Researchers looking at work-family conflict in Canada expected to find lower levels in Quebec as a result of our family-friendly policies. They were surprised to find that this simply wasn’t the case” (para. 4).

“[W]e need a shift in public — and especially workplace — thinking about caregiving” (para. 9).

 

What poverty does to the young brain

Ostrander, M. (2015, June 4). What poverty does to the young brain. The New Yorker. Retrieved from http://www.newyorker.com/

“As it turns out, the conditions that attend poverty—what a National Scientific Council report summarized as ‘overcrowding, noise, substandard housing, separation from parent(s), exposure to violence, family turmoil,’ and other forms of extreme stress—can be toxic to the developing brain, just like drug or alcohol abuse” (para. 3).

Over the past decade, the scientific consensus has become clear: poverty perpetuates poverty, generation after generation, by acting on the brain. . . . The story that science is now telling rearranges the morality of parenting and poverty, making it harder to blame problem children on problem parents” (para. 6).

 

Sport for all: The case for inclusive physical activity programs

Moses, E. (2015, July 17). Sport for all: The case for inclusive physical activity programs [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/edwin-moses/sport-for-all-the-case-for-inclusive-physical-activity-programs_b_7812194.html

Moses commends past and present efforts to reduce barriers to children's participation in physical activity programs and commits Laureus USA to reducing barriers to people with disabilities.

 

Inequality matters

Bernstein, J., & Spielberg, B. (2015, June 5). Inequality matters. The Atlantic. Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com/

“[I]t’s not possible to effectively address either poverty or inadequate opportunity if America hives off its opportunity concerns from the broader problem of inequality (nor, as Senator Rubio intimates, can America reduce inequality by focusing solely on increasing mobility). Boosting mobility will require reductions in wage, income, and wealth inequalities” (para. 3).

 

Sudbury column: New anti-poverty strategy lacking

Raphael, D. (2015, June 8). Sudbury column: New anti-poverty strategy lacking. The Sudbury Star. Retrieved from http://www.thesudburystar.com/

According to Professor Dennis Raphael, the Ontario Liberals acknowledged the power of public policy to alleviate poverty when in opposition, yet have had only impacted poverty modestly while in power. Raphael argues that the government’s policy focusing on local solutions to poverty absolves the government of its responsibility to reduce poverty. 

 

Province helping people out of poverty: Minister

Matthews, D. (2015, June 11). Province helping people out of poverty: Minister. The Sudbury Star. Retrieved from http://www.thesudburystar.com/

Deb Matthews, president of the Treasury Board and minister responsible for Ontario’s Poverty Reduction Strategy, responds to Professor Dennis Raphael’s column, “New anti-poverty reduction strategy lacking”.  Matthews identifies the government’s anti-poverty efforts and states that government alone cannot reduce poverty—the government needs help from communities, citizens, businesses, and the non-profit sector. 

 

What poverty does to the young brain

Ostrander, M. (2015, June). What poverty does to the young brain. The New Yorker. Retrieved from http://www.newyorker.com/

“. . .the conditions that attend poverty—what a National Scientific Council report summarized as ‘overcrowding, noise, substandard housing, separation from parent(s), exposure to violence, family turmoil,’ and other forms of extreme stress—can be toxic to the developing brain, just like drug or alcohol abuse” (para. 3).

“Over the past decade, the scientific consensus has become clear: poverty perpetuates poverty, generation after generation, by acting on the brain” (para. 6).

 

Clinic launched ‘where care matters more than a (health) card’

Keung, N. (2015, June 11). Clinic launched ‘where care matters more than a (health) card’The Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

 “For weeks, volunteer Mark Gomes has been working around the clock to help transform an old two-storey church rectory into a one-of-a-kind medical centre” (para. 1).

“The new 2,800-square-foot facility will house a medical clinic, a dental clinic, pediatric services, midwifery and diagnostic imaging programs, chiropractic and massage services, and a foot care clinic all under one roof. It will be run by medical professionals volunteering their time and will serve some of the GTA’s most vulnerable residents — the undocumented and uninsured” (para. 7).

 

Ontario to crack down on accessibility violators

Monsebraaten, L. (2015, June 3). Ontario to crack down on accessibility violators. The Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

“Starting next year, Ontario’s economic development ministry will move to double compliance audits to 4,000, or 1 per cent of Ontario’s 400,000 businesses” (para. 1).

“Under the province’s Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, businesses with 20 or more employees were supposed to have filed customer service plans with the government by the end of 2012. But to date, only about 40 per cent have submitted the necessary reports on how they accommodate customers with disabilities, train staff and receive customer feedback” (para. 2). 

 

Ontario moving forward with accessibility certification program

Ministry of Economic Development, Employment, and Infrastructure. (2015, May 29). Ontario moving forward with accessibility certification programNews Release. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario websitehttp://news.ontario.ca/medt/en/2015/05/ontario-moving-forward-with-accessibility-certification-program.html

“Ontario is continuing its work towards an accessible province by 2025 by exploring options for a new accessibility certification program” (para. 1).

“The province will consult with industry, disability advocates, certification experts, municipalities, and not-for-profits to develop a voluntary, third-party certification program -- inspired by the success of the LEED designation promoting excellence in green building -- to recognize businesses and organizations that have championed accessibility” (para. 2). 

 

Press releases: City of New Westminster approves family-friendly housing bylaw

New Westminster. (2015, June 2). Press releases: City of New Westminster approves family-friendly housing bylaw [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://www.newwestcity.ca/

“On June 1, 2015, New Westminster City Council amended the Zoning Bylaw to require multi-family ownership projects to include a minimum of 30% two- and three-bedroom units, with at least 10% of the total project units being three-bedrooms or more” (para. 1). 

 

Why we need more at-home dads

Wallberg, M. (2015, June 20). Why we need more at-home dads. The Tyee. Retrieved from http://thetyee.ca/

“Cameron Phillips is a former CBC Vancouver radio host and father of two who understands the personal cost of buying in to such social stigma. Finding himself suddenly laid off and staring anxiously at his one-year-old son, he confronted an uncertain future and all-too-certain bills to pay” (para. 5). 

 

Portland State will train bilingual teachers to help students with autism

Hammond, B. (2015, June 19). Portland State will train bilingual teachers to help students with autism. Oregon Live. Retrieved from http://www.oregonlive.com/

Portland State University has been awarded a $1.25 million grant to prepare bilingual teachers to work with students with autism and other profound disabilities” (para. 1). 

 

Is Kindergarten too late?

Davie, S. (2015, June 23). Is Kindergarten too late? The Straits Times. Retrieved from http://women.asiaone.com/

“Governments around the world are right in paying more attention to early childhood education, but they may not be starting soon enough, says Nobel laureate James Heckman” (para. 1).

“They should do more for children aged 0 to five years old, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds, and not wait till they get to kindergarten or primary school” (para. 2). 

 

Researchers: Five ignored factors affect outcomes for poor children

Layton, L. (2015, June 10). Researchers: Five ignored factors affect outcomes for poor children. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com/

“School leaders and policymakers trying to improve academic results for disadvantaged children need to look outside the classroom at social and economic conditions that directly affect a child’s ability to learn, according to a new report released Wednesday” (para. 1). 

 

Lives in B.C.’s most vulnerable children not improving, says Children’s rep

Lives in B.C.’s most vulnerable children not improving, says Children’s rep. (2015, June 18). CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/

“Life for the most vulnerable children in B.C. has not improved significantly over the past five years, according to a new report” (para. 1).

“The joint report by the Representative for Children and Youth Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond and by Provincial Health Officer Dr. Perry Kendall compared the status of child and youth across six measurable areas” (para. 2). 

 

Government increasing Ontario Child Benefit to help 500,000 families

Ministry of Children and Youth Services. (2015, June 18). Government increasing Ontario Child Benefit to help 500,000 families. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario website http://news.ontario.ca/mcys/en/2015/06/government-increasing-ontario-child-benefit-to-help-500000-families.html

“Ontario is increasing its maximum monthly Ontario Child Benefit (OCB) payment to help eligible families with the cost of raising children. The OCB supports about 500,000 families across Ontario” (para. 1). 

 

Feds put millions toward training special educators

Heasley, S. (2015, June 17). Feds put millions toward training special educators. The Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“With an eye on improving services for students with disabilities, the U.S. Department of Education is funneling millions into programs to train new special educators” (para. 1).

“The Education Department said this week that it is granting $12.8 million to university programs coast to coast to address anticipated shortages in the field” (para. 2). 

 

The observer view on working fathers and childcare [Editorial]

The observer view on working fathers and childcare [Editorial]. (2015, June 21). The Guardian. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com

“In the UK, 10% of full-time carers of children are stay-at-home dads. In the 1950s, a man pushing a pram was a rarity, considered by many to challenge the masculinity of the father. As the first State of the World’s Fathers report published last week to mark Father’s Day reveals, the evolution of positive and involved fatherhood is accelerating apace” (para. 2). 

 

States consider better pay for in-home caregivers

Beitsch, R. (2015, June 10). States consider better pay for in-home caregivers. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Some states are trying to improve home care workers’ wages and benefits, aiming to attract and retain more skilled and dedicated workers in a high-turnover industry. But other states are concerned about adding costs to their Medicaid programs, and some are in court fighting a 2013 U.S. Department of Labor regulation that would apply minimum wage and overtime rules to home care workers, who have long been exempt” (para. 3).

 

What our kids are learning when adults aren’t inclusive

Perry, D. (2015, June 11). What our kids are learning when adults aren’t inclusive. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com

“When a child with disabilities is kept out of an activity, not only will it hurt them (and their families), but the typical children internalize this segregation as necessary. They will carry that lesson forward. . . .The ADA [Americans with Disabilities Act] and IDEA [Individuals with Disabilities Education Act] generation is primed to shake up society, but they are going to need positive models” (para. 11).

 

Autism program changes worry some Minneapolis parents

Post, T. (2015, June 9). Autism program changes worry some Minneapolis parentsMPR News. Retrieved from http://www.mprnews.org

“The district plans to spread autism teachers and special education aides across city schools, rather than concentrating programs.

The Minneapolis Federation of Teachers has expressed concern, saying the district is moving too fast. Some parents were expected to ask the school board Tuesday to reconsider the idea, saying the current system works” (para. 4-5). 

 

Paternity leave: Why so few Canadian dads take time off

Racanelli, H. (2015, May 25). Paternity leave: Why so few Canadian dads take time off. Huffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.ca

 ““Only one in 10 eligible fathers was claiming parental-leave benefits through Employment Insurance (EI), a ceiling that has held since an initial rush of men taking paternity leave in the mid-2000s,” reports a Macleans' [sic] article published earlier this month” (para. 3). 

 

Swedish fathers to get third month of paid paternity leave

France-Presse, A. (2015, May 28). Swedish fathers to get third month of paid paternity leaveThe Guardian. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com

Sweden is planning to introduce a third month of paid parental leave reserved for fathers as of 2016, in a bid to further increase gender equality, the country’s government has announced” (para. 1). 

 

Supreme Court punts on special ed, ADA cases

Heasley, S. (2015, May 19). Supreme Court punts on special ed, ADA casesDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“In a ruling issued Monday, the high court failed to address key questions about the implications of the ADA [Americans with Disabilities Act] in situations involving law enforcement” (para. 2). 

 

Feds call for greater inclusion in preschools

Diament, M. (2015, May 19). Feds call for greater inclusion in preschools. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/05/19/feds-inclusion-preschools/20318/

“The Obama administration wants to see more kids with disabilities — no matter how significant — participating in classrooms alongside their typically-developing peers” (para. 1). 

 

Mounting evidence of advantages for children of working mothers

Miller, C. (2015, May 15). Mounting evidence of advantages for children of working mothersThe New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

“[E]vidence is mounting that having a working mother has some economic, educational and social benefits for children of both sexes” (para. 2). 

 

'Mom brain' is real: Study suggests motherhood permanently alters brain

Chan, E. (2015, May 25). 'Mom brain' is real: Study suggests motherhood permanently alters brain. CTV News. Retrieved from http://www.ctvnews.ca/

“A new study seems to confirm what many mothers already knew: pregnancy and motherhood can permanently alter your brain and affect how it responds to treatments later in life” (para. 1).

“The study, released Monday, tested how types of hormone therapy affected rats that had experienced motherhood, as opposed to rats that had not” (para. 2). 

 

How suburban schools get kids ready for kindergarten

Krishnamuthy, M. (2015, April 27). How suburban schools get kids ready for kindergarten. Daily Herald. Retrieved from http://www.dailyherald.com/

This article describes how some suburban schools in Chicago are using programs such as drop-ins and extended-day enrichment to help parents prepare their children for kindergarten socially and emotionally. 

 

Feds put brakes on special education cutbacks

Diament, M. (2015, April 28). Feds put brakes on special education cutbacks. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, schools are required to spend at least as much on special education as they did the prior year” (para. 2).

“Now the Education Department is clarifying that in cases where school districts run afoul of the spending requirement . . . for any given year, they are still expected to achieve the original, higher funding level for future years” (para. 2).

 

In girls, ASD symptoms often less apparent

Heasley, S. (2015, April 28). In girls, ASD symptoms often less apparent. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

 “Girls are frequently diagnosed with autism at older ages than boys and new research suggests that may be because they present with different symptoms” (para. 1). 

 

Family time: Quantity vs. quality

Banga, R. (2015). Family time: Quantity vs. quality [Web log comment]Retrieved fromhttps://www.bccf.ca/bccf/blog/family-time-quantity-vs-quality/

Despite the cultural belief that spending more time with your kids helps them, a recent study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family says that might not be true” (para. 1).

 

Working dads under pressure to spend more time with kids

Bielski, Z. (2015, April 9). Working dads under pressure to spend more time with kids. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com

Even as fathers spend more time with their kids than ever before, they’re also getting harder on themselves as parents. In many cases, dads feel more guilt than moms do about the amount of time they’re devoting to family, according to figures from the Pew Research Center, a Washington-based think tank” (para. 1).

 

Ontario helping more schools become community hubs

Ministry of Education. (2016, May 6). Ontario helping more schools become community hubs. News Release. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario website https://news.ontario.ca/edu/en/2016/05/ontario-helping-more-schools-become-community-hubs.html?utm_source=ondemand&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=p

As a response to recommendations in Community Hubs in Ontario: A Strategic Framework and Action Plan, the province of Ontario committed to supporting the use of schools as community hubs (para. 2). As a result, Ontario is investing nearly $90 million dollars to expand child care and child and family support programs in schools and create spaces in schools for community use (para. 1). 

 

Supreme court rules against disability providers

Heasley, S. (2015, March 31). Supreme court rules against disability providersDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“Developmental disability service providers cannot sue to force state Medicaid programs to raise their reimbursement rates, the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled” (para. 1).

 

Parental leave plan ‘must not alter existing rights’

Cionnaith, F. (2015, April 8). Parental leave plan ‘must not alter existing rights’The Irish Examiner. Retrieved from http://www.irishexaminer.com

“Any Government plans to allow parents to share up to year’s leave after having a baby must not dilute the existing 26 weeks guaranteed leave for mothers” (para. 1).

The National Women’s Council of Ireland (NWCI) made the call after reports that an inter-departmental group is considering putting forward new parental leave rules for couples” (para. 2).

 

Encouraging paternity leave leads men to take on more child care, study shows

Schulte, B. (2015, April 4). Encouraging paternity leave leads men to take on more child care, study shows. The Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/  

“Newly released research shows that a small change in policy — making it ‘normal’ and expected for fathers to take parental leave — led men not only to spend more time with their new babies but also to do more housework and pick up more child-care responsibilities down the road” (para. 1).

 

Premier Wynne appoints special advisor on community hubs

Office of the Premier. (2015, March 20). Premier Wynne appoints special advisor on community hubs. Retrieved from Government of Ontario Newsroom website: http://news.ontario.ca/opo/en/2015/03/premier-wynne-appoints-special-advisor-on-community-hubs.html?utm_source=E-Newsletter&utm_campaign=ede94f0f61-News_Apr_7&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_422aeb3dbd-ede94f0f61-18788777

“Premier Kathleen Wynne has appointed Karen Pitre as Special Advisor on Community Hubs. Pitre will chair the new Premier's Community Hub Framework Advisory Group. The members of the advisory group will be announced in the coming weeks” (para. 1). 

 

Report finds more states limiting restraint, seclusion

Diament, M. (2015, March 31). Report finds more states  limiting restraint, seclusionDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“Though federal efforts to restrict the use of restraint and seclusion in schools have stagnated, an analysis finds a growing number of states have implemented laws to curtail the practices” (para. 1). 

 

Disability caregiving may lead to memory decline in moms

Heasley, S. (2015, April 10). Disability caregiving may lead to memory decline in momsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“The stress of caring for a child with a disability may truly take a toll, with a new study suggesting that mothers of those with special needs see greater declines in memory as they age” (para. 1).

 

Study: Talkative fathers matter for young children

Mongeau, L. (2015, March 23). Study: Talkative fathers matter for young children [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://blogs.edweek.org/

“How much fathers talk to young children has a direct positive effect on their kindergarten performance, according to a study by researchers in the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill” (para. 1).

“The study, published in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology in January, concluded that more-talkative dads are a benefit to their kids” (para. 2). 

 

Schools warned on pushing families into due process

Heasley, S. (2015, April 23). Schools warned on pushing families into due process. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“Federal education officials are warning school districts to think twice before forcing parents into potentially long and costly due process proceedings” (para. 1).

 

Ontario launches public consultations to improve access to affordable housing

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing. (2015, April 14). Ontario launches public consultations to improve access to affordable housing. Retrieved from Government of Ontario Newsroom website: http://news.ontario.ca/mah/en/2015/04/ontario-launches-public-consultations-to-improve-access-to-affordable-housing.html

“Ontario is launching consultations to support a renewed Long-Term Affordable Housing Strategy to ensure that the document supports the Province's goals of improving outcomes for people and ending homelessness” (para. 1). 

 

Improving access to services for young children and their families: Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres to offer a full suite of services

Office of the Premier. (2016, February 19). Improving access to services for young children and their families: Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres to offer a full suite of services. News Release. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario website https://news.ontario.ca

"Ontario is delivering on its commitment to make access to child and family programs easier by announcing the launch of Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres. These centres will offer parents and their children a suite of high-quality early years programs, as well as local services tailored to their communities" (para. 1). 

 

Future changes expected for Muskoka early years programs

Brownlee, A. (2016, April 7). Future changes expected for Muskoka early years programs. Muskoka Region. Retrieved from http://www.muskokaregion.com

"Tina Kilbourne, manager of children’s programs for the District of Muskoka, believes that there may be changes. "We already run programs and we already manage the childcare system, for example, so we may be able to find efficiencies in the system, which may mean we find a way to move a program, save dollars and stay open longer, or have more days open or find new locations. But there won’t be reduced service, that’s for sure" (para. 12). 

 

Ottawa urged to put child poverty pledge into action

Monsebraaten, L. (2015, March 11). Ottawa urged to put child poverty pledge into action. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from www.thestar.com

In the wake of last month's near unanimous reaffirmation of Parliament's 1989 pledge to end child poverty, activists are urging federal politicians to show how they would turn this latest promise into action” (para. 1).

“In a letter to the four federal party leaders Wednesday, Campaign 2000 is calling for detailed anti-poverty plans to be part of this year's federal election” (para. 2). 

 

New study points to better classrooms for children with disabilities

Graham, F. (2015, March 5). New study points to better classrooms for children with disabilitiesEurekAlert! Retrieved from www.eurekalert.org

“A pilot study in 51 N.C. [North Carolina] classrooms shows the effectiveness of a new measure in assessing the quality of practices in inclusive preschools. Not only is the Inclusive Classroom Profile (ICP) a reliable instrument, researchers say it also reveals the types of inclusive settings that may be best serving preschoolers with disabilities” (para. 1). 

 

Is the biggest learning disability an emotional one?

Berdik, C. (2015, March 4). Is the biggest learning disability an emotional oneThe Hechinger Report. Retrieved from www.hechingerreport.org

 “[Neuopsychologist, David] Rose and his team have concluded that the most pervasive learning disability in schools, and the number one challenge for UDL [Universal Design for Learning], isn’t physical or cognitive, it’s emotional—turning around kids who are turned off by school” (para. 3). 

 

Visiting nurses, helping mothers on the margins

Tavernise, S. (2015, March 8). Visiting nurses, helping mothers on the marginsThe New York Times. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com

“. . . home visiting programs, paid for through the Affordable Care Act, are at the heart of a sweeping federal effort aimed at one of the nation’s most entrenched social problems: the persistently high rates of infant mortality. The programs have spread to some 800 cities and towns in recent years, and are testing whether successful small-scale efforts to improve children’s health by educating mothers can work on a broad national canvas” in the United States (para. 5).

 

Never too early: Expelled in preschool

Neufeld, S. (2015, February 22). Never too early: Expelled in preschoolThe Hechinger Report. Retrieved from http://hechingerreport.org/

“In 2005, Yale professor Walter Gilliam shocked the nation with the first research showing that preschoolers are expelled at three times the rate of children in kindergarten through 12th grade” (para. 4). 

 

Ontario releases updated health and physical education curriculum, parent resources

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2015, February 23). Ontario releases updated health and physical education curriculum, parent resources. Retrieved from http://news.ontario.ca/edu/en/2015/02/ontario-releases-updated-health-physical-education-curriculum-parent-resources.html?utm_source=ondemand&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=p

“Ontario is releasing [an] updated Health and Physical Education curriculum to give students accurate information that will help keep them safe and healthy” (para. 1).

The importance of this article to family supports is the resources available to parents/home:

  • An outline of the new Health and Physical Education curriculum for Grades 1-12.
  • Guides on human development and sexual health part of the curriculum - one for Grades 1-6 and one for Grades 7-12.
  • Quick reference sheets about healthy relationships and consent as well as online safety, including the risks of sexting” (para. 3).
 

In fight over service dog, school is brought to heel

Marbin, C. (2015, February 25). In fight over service dog, school board is brought to heel. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

This article shares the story of how seven-year-old Anthony Merchante came to be supported by his white-and-tan Staffordshire terrier, Stevie, at school. 

 

New hub for early education

Welch, M. A. (2015, February 18). New hub for early educationWinnipeg Free Press. Retrieved from http://www.winnipegfreepress.com

“Melanie Wight, minister of children and youth opportunities [sic], is to announce the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization of Manitoba (IRCOM) housing complex on Isabel Street will include a new family resource centre and a casual drop-in daycare to complement the full-time daycare centre already under construction” (para. 2). 

 

The case for paternity leave

Carr, J. (2015, February 8). The case for paternity leave. Vox. Retrieved from www.vox.com

“The experts agreed that though we've made great strides, there is much still left to be done to make paternity leave a universal-and universally acceptable-option for dads around the world” (para. 3). 

 

Pacifying toddlers with tablets, smartphones may hurt development, scientists speculate

Edwards, P. (2015, February 6). Pacifying toddlers with tablets, smartphones may hurt development, scientists speculate. The Star. Retrieved from www.thestar.com.

“There’s a danger children won’t learn how to calm themselves if they’re constantly handed tablets and smartphones to distract them, a child behaviour expert says” (para. 3)

 

What happens to a woman’s brain when she becomes a mother

LaFrance, A. (2015, January 8). What happens to a woman’s brain when she becomes a motherThe Atlantic. Retrieved from www.theatlantic.com

“Even before a woman gives birth, pregnancy tinkers with the very structure of her brain, several neurologists told me. After centuries of observing behavioral changes in new mothers, scientists are only recently beginning to definitively link the way a woman acts with what's happening in her prefrontal cortex, midbrain, parietal lobes, and elsewhere” (para. 3). 

 

Early intervention program review underway

Allen, C. (2015, February 10). Early intervention program review underway. Nova News Now. Retrieved from http://www.novanewsnow.com/

The government will address four key areas of early intervention to improve services to children and their families.

The four areas are:

• improving access to early intervention for families

• strengthening early intervention programs across the province

• supporting and developing the early intervention workforce

• aligning early intervention programs with the early years system and the public school system” (para. 4-5). 

 

Mobile and interactive media use by young children: The good, the bad and the unknown

Boston University Medical Center. (2015, January 30). Mobile and interactive media use by young children: The good, the bad and the unknownEurekAlert. Retrieved from www.eurekalart.org

“This commentary notes that while mobile device use by children can provide an educational benefit, the use of these devices to distract children during mundane tasks may be detrimental to the social-emotional development of the child” (para. 3). 

 

Maternal depression often starts before giving birth, study says

Belluck, P. (2015, February 2). Maternal depression often starts before giving birth, study saysThe New York Times. Retrieved from www.well.blogs.nytimes.com

“A large new study has documented unexpected links in the timing and severity of symptoms of maternal depression, which could help mothers and doctors better anticipate and treat the condition” (para. 1). 

 

Obama budget calls for boost to disability programs

Heasley, S. (2015, February 3). Obama budget calls for boost to disability programsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from www.disabilityscoop.com

“President Barack Obama wants Congress to halt planned cuts under sequestration and increase funding for special education and other programs for people with disabilities” (para. 1).

 

Study: High-quality early education could reduce costs

Layton, L. (2015, February 3). Study: High-quality early education could reduce costsThe Washington Post. Retrieved from www.washingtonpost.com

“The researchers explored how two early childhood initiatives in North Carolina affected the likelihood that children would be placed in special education by the end of third grade. It focused on a preschool program for four-year-olds from at-risk families and a program that provides child, family, and health services for children from birth through age five” (para. 3).

 

Obama plans to push paid family and sick leave for workers

Davis, J. (2015, January 14). Obama plans to push paid family and sick leave for workersThe New York Times. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com

“The president needs congressional approval to require federal agencies to provide the six weeks of paid parental leave. But in the absence of that legislation, the president will sign a memorandum to mandate that agencies advance new mothers and fathers a six-week chunk of paid time off — a benefit that is now only discretionary” (para. 3).

 

The economic benefits of paid parental leave

Miller, C. (2015, January 30). The economic benefits of paid parental leave. The New York Times. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com

“Economists have found that with paid leave, more people take time off, particularly low-income parents who may have taken no leave or dropped out of the work force after the birth. Paid leave raises the probability that mothers return to employment later, and then work more hours and earn higher wages. Paid leave does not necessarily help businesses — but it does not seem to hurt them, either” (para. 7).

 

Smartphone, tablet overuse among toddles may stunt development

Kwong, M. (2015, February 3). Smartphone, tablet overuse among toddles may stunt development. CBC News. Retrieved from www.cbc.ca

“They're called "smart" devices, but overloading toddlers with smartphones and other mobile technology could hold back their development” (para. 1).

 

Efforts underway to fully fund IDEA

Heasly, S. (2015, January 28). Efforts underway to fully fund IDEADisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

“A bill introduced Tuesday in the U.S. House of Representatives calls for Uncle Sam to increase funding for the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act incrementally. Congress committed to pay 40 percent of the cost — a level that is considered to be full funding — back when IDEA first became law in 1975, but has never lived up to that threshold and currently covers just 16 percent. . . . Under the proposed IDEA Full Funding Act, the federal government would increase spending over a decade, ultimately footing 40 percent of the nation’s bill for special education.” (para. 2-4).

 

General social survey: Giving, volunteering, and participating, 2013

Statistics Canada. (2015). General social survey: Giving, volunteering, and participating, 2013. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150130/dq150130b-eng.htm

This report highlights the 2013 trends for giving, volunteering, and participating in Canada. Data is provided regarding the changing profile of volunteers and donors, regional variations in volunteering and giving, and patterns in volunteering.  

 

Autism genes often differ, even among siblings

Diament, M. (2015, January 27). Autism genes often differ, even among siblingsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from www.disabilityscoop.com

“Adding to confusion about the roots of autism, new research suggests that varying genes are often responsible for the disorder even among siblings who share a diagnosis” (para. 1).

“After sequencing the whole genomes of individuals from dozens of families — each with at least two children on the spectrum — researchers found that less than a third of affected siblings shared the same autism-associated gene variations” (para. 3). 

 

Feds to appeal ruling on caregiver wage protections

Heasley, S. (2015, January 26). Feds to appeal ruling on caregiver wage protectionsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from www.disabilityscoop.com

“The Obama administration will appeal a court ruling blocking regulations aimed at providing minimum wage and overtime protections for in-home care workers assisting people with disabilities” (para. 1).

 

America’s family-leave disgrace

Talbot, M. (2015, January 22). America’s family-leave disgraceThe New Yorker. Retrieved from www.newyorker.com

“In his State of the Union address on Tuesday, President Barack Obama vowed to make family leave and sick days a priority in the final two years of his Presidency. . . . In the United States, where all sorts of powers are commonly attributed to the private sector, many people might imagine that employers take up the slack. But the majority of U.S. employers do not offer paid family leave, for the simple reason that they don’t have to” (para. 1). 

 

Toronto budget fails to address poverty reduction

Santokie, K. (2015, January 23). Toronto budget fails to address poverty reduction. The Star. Retrieved from www.thestar.com

“The 2015 budget reminded us yet again that Toronto has a revenue collection problem and not a spending problem. Yet, this problematic budget purports to address an even bigger issue in our city: the fact that nearly half a million people live below the poverty line” (para. 2). 

 

Reducing our obscene level of child poverty

Blow, C. (2015, January 28). Reducing our obscene level of child povertyThe New York Times. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com

Blow shares highlights from a report released by the Children’s Defense Fund’s, Ending Child Poverty Now.

 

Canadian family policy stuck in the past, report says

Monsebraaten, L. (2015, January 26). Canadian family policy stuck in the past, report says. The Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

“Family policy in Canada needs to grow up and recognize the need for child care, parental leave for fathers and tax measures that support low- and moderate-income parents, not just the wealthy, says a new report being released Tuesday” (para. 1). 

 

Siblings with autism may have their own form of the disorder, study reveals

Allen, K. (2015, January 26). Siblings with autism may have their own form of the disorder, study revealsThe Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

In a study recently published in Nature Medicine, Stephen Scherer and colleagues sequenced genomes to discover that “among the children whose genes told researchers a story about why they had autism, more than two-thirds told a different story than their brother or sister” (para. 8). 

 

Violent beginnings: How to help preschoolers who witness violence and trauma

Ramirez, M. (2015, January 20). Violent beginnings: How to help preschoolers who witness violence and traumaThe Hechinger Report. Retrieved from http://hechingerreport.org/

“Julian’s case illustrates a larger, more complex issue simmering inside many of the nation’s early childhood centers that serve children impacted by violence and poverty. According to a recent nationally representative survey, 13 percent of infants a year-old and younger and 44 percent of all 2- to 5-year-olds were assault victims in the prior year. Eight percent of infants and 14 percent of 2-to 5-year-olds had also witnessed violence” (para. 5). 

 

Parent-led intervention may lower kids’ autism risk

Diament, M. (2015, January 22). Parent-led intervention may lower kids’ autism riskDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Training parents to enhance social interactions with their infant children may reduce the likelihood that kids at risk for autism will ultimately develop the disorder, researchers say” (para. 1). 

 

Too Small to Fail, Text4Baby and Sesame Street launch first national text-to-parents program to support young children’s early language development

Too Small to Fail. (n.d.). Too Small to Fail, Text4Baby and Sesame Street launch first national text-to-parents program to support young children’s early language development. Retrieved from http://toosmall.org/news/press-releases/too-small-to-fail-text4baby-and-sesame-street-launch-first-national-text-to-parents-program-to-support-young-childrens-early-language-development

“Too Small to Fail and Sesame Street launched today a new text-to-parents program in partnership with the free mobile health information service, Text4baby, to distribute research-based tips to new parents about the importance of talking, reading and singing with their newborn children” (para. 1). 

 

White House makes big push for paid family leave

Jameison, D. (2015, January 14). White House makes big push for paid family leaveHuffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/

“President Barack Obama plans to sign a memorandum giving federal workers at least six weeks of paid family leave after a child is born, according to a post by White House adviser Valerie Jarrett on the professional networking site linkedIn” (para. 1).

 

After-school physical activity targeted by new initiative

After-school physical activity targeted by new initiative. (2015, January 16). CBC News  Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/

“Tara Werner, the programs manager at Recreation New Brunswick, helped develop a new program called ‘NB Plays’ for after-school programs so they can find ways to encourage more activities during that high-risk time period” (para. 3). 

 

Early interventions review to address waitlists, increase supports

Education and Early Child Development. (2015, January 20). Early interventions review to address waitlists, increase supports. Retrieved from the Province of Nova Scotia website: http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20150120002

“Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Karen Casey announced today, Jan. 20, the government will address four key areas of early intervention to improve services to children and their families. The four areas are: improving access to early intervention for families, strengthening early intervention programs across the province, supporting and developing the early intervention workforce, and aligning early intervention programs with the early years system and the public school system” (para. 2). 

 

Ontario increases wages for early childhood educators

Office of the Premier. (2015, January 19). Ontario increases wages for early childhood educators. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario website: http://news.ontario.ca/opo/en/2015/01/ontario-increases-wages-for-early-childhood-educators.html

 “Premier Kathleen Wynne announced today that the Ontario government is increasing wages for early childhood educators and front-line child care professionals in licensed child care settings. Starting this month, Ontario is implementing a wage increase of $1 per hour for eligible child care workers in the licensed child care sector. Another wage increase is set for next year” (para. 1-2). 

 

SPARmonitor

Social Policy Analysis and Research, City of Toronto. (2014). SPARmonitor (145). Retrieved from   http://www.canadiansocialresearch.net/SPAR_Research_Bulletin_145.pdf

The publication highlights recent social research information relevant to the City of Toronto. The publication includes links to the Well-being Toronto Version 3 application, to a paper on immigration and income, to Education at a Glance by the OECD, and to a paper about managing healthcare for an aging population.  

 

Annual earnings exemptions urged for Ontario welfare recipients

Monsebraaten, L. (2015, January 14). Annual earnings exemptions urged for Ontario welfare recipients. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

“Moving from monthly to annualized exemptions would encourage recipients to work more and keep more — and might even ease Ontario’s computer system woes.” 

 

Three ways to end poverty in Canada

Cooper, D. (2015, January 5). Three ways to end poverty in CanadaThe Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

This article addresses the poverty epidemic in Toronto and suggests three ways to combat this problem: focusing on education, establishing a basic income plan for Canadians, and getting serious about tax reform. 

 

In practice, IDEA remedies may not be available to all

Heasley, S. (2015, January 14). In practice, IDEA remedies may not be available to allDisability Scoop.http://www.disabilityscoop.com/ 

“Family income appears to be a major factor influencing whether parents will seek mediation or due process in special education disputes with their child’s school district. A nationwide survey of over 500 parents with children on the autism spectrum finds that families earning more than $100,000 a year are significantly more likely to pursue litigation compared to those with incomes that are half that level” (para. 1-2).

 

Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2013

Statistics Canada. (2015, January 15). Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2013. Retrieved from Government of Canada website: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150115/dq150115a-eng.htm 

This statistical profile provides data information about family violence in Canada, including intimate partner violence, the national pattern for police-reported violent crime, and trends in the individuals who report this violence.

 

Caregiver wage, overtime protections struck down

Diament, M. (2015, January 16). Caregiver wage, overtime protections struck downDisability scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/  

“A federal judge has put a stop to a new rule requiring that in-home care workers assisting people with disabilities be paid minimum wage and overtime” (para. 1).

 

Baby Brains

Bhattacharjee, Y. (2015, January). Baby BrainsNational Geographic. Retrieved from http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2015/01/baby-brains/bhattacharjee-text

This article looks at how babies’ brains develop substantially in the first year and how factors such as exposure to drug abuse and poverty can impact this development.

 

Domestic abuse may affect children in womb

Levendosky, A., & Henion, A. (2014, Dec 16). Domestic abuse may affect children in wombMichigan State University Today. Retrieved from http://msutoday.msu.edu

“Domestic violence can affect children even before they’re born, indicates new research by Michigan State University scientists. The study is the first to link abuse of pregnant women with emotional and behavioral trauma symptoms in their children within the first year of life” (para. 1-2).

 

Early caregiving experiences have long-term effects on social relationships, achievement

Society for Research in Child Development. (2014, December 18). Early caregiving experiences have long-term effects on social relationships, achievementEurekAlert!Retrieved from http://www.eurekalert.org

“Do the effects of early caregiving experiences remain or fade as individuals develop? A new study has found that sensitive caregiving in the first three years of life predicts an individual's social competence and academic achievement, not only during childhood and adolescence, but also into adulthood” (para. 1).

 

Dads-to-be may experience hormone changes before their babies are born, study shows

Adams, R. (2014, December 22). Dads-to-be may experience hormone changes before their babies are born, study showsHuffington Post. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost.com

 “A new study suggests that expecting fathers go through their own share of hormonal shifts as the due date approaches. The study, published in the American Journal of Human Biology on Dec. 15, was the first to look at how men's hormones change along with the mother's while she's still pregnant” (para. 2). 

 

The talking cure

Talbot, M. (2015, January 12). The talking cureAnnals of Education-The New Yorker. Retrieved from http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/01/12/talking-cure

Providence Talks in one of several new programs across the United States that encourages low-income parents to talk more frequently with their children. Once a month the child wears a small recording device for the day. The recording is then analyzed. An algorithm tallies all of words spoken by the child in their vicinity, all the vocalizations that the child makes, and all of the conversational turns. The caseworker then goes to the child’s home to give the child's parent/guardian a progress report that outlines a graph showing how many words the child has been hearing and how the words peak and dip throughout the day.

 

How do smartphones affect childhood psychology?

Williams, A. (2014, December 22). How do smartphones affect childhood psychology? Psych Central. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com

This article  provides an overview of various risks and benefits of technology to children's psychology and development, as well as recommendations for using smartphones to foster communication, learning, and relationships.

 

Moms using mobile devices during mealtime interact less with children

Moms using mobile devices during mealtime interact less with children. (2014, December 9). Retrieved from http://www.bumc.bu.edu/busm/2014/12/09/mobile-device-use-leads-to-few-interactions-between-mother-and-child-during-mealtime/

"Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) found mothers with the most mobile device use had significantly fewer verbal interactions with their children than mothers who had no or negligible use while eating. . . . According to the researchers, nonverbal interactions are a primary mode through which emotional content is communicated between parents and children, so its frequent displacement could represent a significant decrease in emotional connection" (para. 3-4).

 

The perils of texting while parenting

Worthen, B. (2012, September 29). The perils of texting while parentingThe Wall Street Journal. Retrieved from http://www.wsj.com

“ . . . many emergency-room doctors are worried: They see the growing use of hand-held electronic devices as a plausible explanation for the surprising reversal of a long slide in injury rates for young children" (para. 4).

 

Your brain on computers: The risks of parenting while plugged in

Scelfo, J. (2010, June 9). Your brain on computers: The risks of parenting while plugged in. The New York Times. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com

"Much of the concern about cellphones and instant messaging and Twitter has been focused on how children who incessantly use the technology are affected by it. But parents’ use of such technology — and its effect on their offspring — is now becoming an equal source of concern to some child-development researchers" (para. 4).

 

Time to focus on the world's youngest children

Lombardi, J. (2014, December 3). Time to focus on the world's youngest children. Inter Press Service. Retrieved from http://www.ips.org/

"From Kampala to Kingston; Delhi to Denver; and São Paulo to Santiago, giving children a strong start in life is critical to not only the growth and development of individuals, but also the growth and development of nations" (para. 1). 

 

Home Child Care Association of Ontario calls for all home child care to be licensed

Home Childcare Association of Ontario. (2014, December 10). Home Child Care Association of Ontario calls for all home child care to be licensed. Canadian Newswire. Retrieved from http://www.newswire.ca/

"In response to the Auditor General's Report relating to child care in Ontario, the Home Child Care Association of Ontario (HCCAO) is supporting the call to ensure that adequate policies and procedures are in place to verify that private-home day care agencies comply with legislative requirements and deliver services to children in a healthy, safe environment" (para. 1).

 

Quebec moves to ban IVF for women over 42

Grant, K. (2014, December 5). New rules may leave parents scrambling for daycare. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/

"The majority Liberal government last week tabled a bill that would make it illegal for women over the age of 42 to undergo IVF. Quebec’s proposed age limit is just one part of a dramatic curtailment of the province’s publicly funded assisted procreation program, but the change is reigniting the debate about a classic motherhood issue: How old is too old to give birth" (para. 3-4)?

 

Ontario strengthening child care oversight: Modernizing the child care sector for Ontario families

Ministry of Education. (2014, December 2). Ontario strengthening child care oversight: Modernizing the child care sector for Ontario families. Government of Ontario. Retrieved form http://news.ontario.ca/

This news release from the Ministry of Education discusses the Child Care Modernization Act (Bill 10) that passed third reading in the Ontario legislature on December 2nd, 2014. 

 

Lawmakers poised to vote on ABLE Act

Diament, M. (2014, December 2). Lawmakers poised to vote on ABLE Act. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"Congress is set to act this week on legislation that would allow people with disabilities to save money without jeopardizing their government benefits" (para. 1). 

 

Prevention and elimination of disrespect and abuse during childbirth

WHO. (2014). Prevention and elimination of disrespect and abuse during childbirth. WHO. Retrieved from http://www.who.int/

"Every woman has the right to the highest attainable standard of health, including the right to dignified, respectful care during pregnancy and childbirth. However, across the world many women experience disrespectful, abusive, or neglectful treatment during childbirth in facilities. These practices can violate women’s rights, deter women from seeking and using maternal health care services and can have implications for their health and well-being" (para. 1). 

 

Women's issues are just, well, issues

Rabson, M. (2014, November 21). Women's issues are just, well, issues. Winnipeg Free Press. Retrieved from http://www.winnipegfreepress.com

"Sexual harassment. Violence against women. Child care. Abortion. There is a clear trend this fall in the subjects dominating our national discussions, in that issues which have long been considered the purview mainly of women, are taking centre stage" (para. 1-2).

 

What happened when one Canadian dad took a 37-Week parental leave? (Nothing bad.)

Grose, J. (2014, November 21). What happened when one Canadian dad took a 37-Week parental leave? (Nothing bad.) Slate. Retrieved from http://www.slate.com

This article is part of an occasional series by Slate asking the question "Is it really so much easier to be a working parent in Paris than it is in Peoria? We asked working moms and dads from all over the world to tell us their child care experiences" (para. 2). In this edition, the writer speaks to a mother from Montreal. 

 

Sticks, carrots and a real child-care system

Friendly, M. (2014, November 13). Sticks, carrots and a real child-care systemThe Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

"With a set of long-overdue changes to Ontario’s child-care policy about to go to committee hearings, now is an important time to reflect on how best to protect our children. Ontario ombudsman André Marin recently uncovered “systematic government ineptitude” contributing to the deaths of four children over seven months in unregulated child care. Marin’s report, prepared within a narrow mandate, calls for crucial changes to help clean up the unregulated child-care “morass”" (para. 1,2).

 

Schools must offer communication supports, feds say

Diament, M. (2014, November 13). Schools must offer communication supports, feds say. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

"The Obama administration is reminding schools of their wide-ranging responsibilities to students with disabilities who struggle with speech and other communication difficulties" (para. 1).

 

Good child care is good for the economy

McCraken. M, & Prentice, S. (2014, November 13). Good child care is good for the economy. Winnipeg Free Press. Retrieved from http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/

"This week, hundreds of educators, academics and activists gather in Winnipeg for the fourth national child-care conference. They are united by a vision of a universal early childhood education and child-care system in Canada. Here in Manitoba, we have made steady progress toward this goal. A strong federal partner at the table would take things to the next level" (para. 1).

 

Paternity leave: The rewards and the remaining stigma

Miller, C. C. (2014, November 7). Paternity leave: The rewards and the remaining stigma. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

"Social scientists who study families and work say that [men] who take an early hands-on role in their children’s lives, are likely to be more involved for years to come and that their children will be healthier... But researchers also have a more ominous message. Taking time off for family obligations, including paternity leave, could have long-term negative effects on a man’s career — like lower pay or being passed over for promotions" (para. 3).

 

Child-care advocates say parents have clear choice in next federal election

Monsebraaten, L. (2014, November 3). Child-care advocates say parents have clear choice in next federal electionThe Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

"The battle lines for the hearts and minds of Canadian parents in next fall’s federal election have been drawn. On one side is the Harper government’s new package of “family-friendly” tax measures, including income splitting and enhanced monthly child-care benefits. On the other is the NDP’s promise of one million child-care spaces at no more than $15 a day. The Liberals, who are expected to release their own daycare plan in the coming months, have vowed to repeal income splitting if elected" (para. 1-3).

 

New rural daycare will keep Manitoba parents from crossing border

Coubrough, J. (2014, October 30) New rural daycare will keep Manitoba parents from crossing borderCBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/

A new rural daycare has been opened in Pipestone, Manitoba where parent had been crossing the border to find childcare spaces that met their needs. 

 

Dad in-training: Child-care policy that actually helps families

Kates, D. (2014, November 4). Dad in-training: Child-care policy that actually helps families. Canada.com. Retrieved from http://o.canada.com

"After years of talk and failed policies, child care in Canada continues to face major problems of affordability and accessibility."

 

High quality early childhood education primes children for family income decline

Iyer, S. (2014, October 23). High quality early childhood education primes children for family income decline. Medical Daily. Retrieved from http://www.medicaldaily.com/

"There has been an established relationship between the financial status and the development of children in a family. While it is known that a sudden drop in income adversely impacts children’s behavior, a new study shows that those receiving high quality early childhood education and care centers are better buffered to handle such circumstances than those who did not get such education" (para. 1).

 

Keeping Ontario's kids active after school

Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Spirt. (2014, October 30). Keeping Ontario's kids active after school. Retrieved from http://news.ontario.ca/

"Ontario's After School Program funding will help service providers to deliver programs at over 400 locations in priority neighbourhoods across the province. These programs will give more than 21,000 children and youth the opportunity to participate in sport and recreation activities and learn about healthy habits" (para. 2).

 

Parents pine for cheaper daycare

Migneault, J. (2014, October 14). Parents pine for cheaper daycareNorthern Life. Retrieved from http://www.northernlife.ca/

"Due to the high cost of daycare for his four children, Jean Ngoabe has to stay home two days a week, which reduces his earning potential. Ngoabe said he hopes the NDP will be able to enact its national child-care plan that would ensure parents would pay no more than $15 a day for child care" (para. 1, 2).

 

Protect our children with licensed daycare spaces: Editorial

The Toronto Star. (2014, October 27). Protect our children with licensed daycare spaces: Editorial. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

"Ontario Ombudsman André Marin reports that four children died as a result of “systematic government ineptitude” in unlicensed daycare in 2013-2014" (para. 1).

 

AECEO responds to NDP National Childcare program announcement

Dacosta, L. (2014, October 16). AECEO responds to NDP National Childcare program announcementAECEO. Retrieved from http://www.aeceo.ca/

"The Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario (AECEO) welcomes the announcement made yesterday by Thomas Mulcair and the Federal NDP regarding their plan to implement a national high quality and affordable childcare program if elected" (para. 1).

 

What can we learn from Quebec’s child care experience?

Milligan, K. (2014, October 15). What can we learn from Quebec’s child care experience?Maclean's. Retrieved from http://www.macleans.ca/

"Other provinces might go in different directions, but surely we should learn as much as we can from Quebec’s $7-per-day program as a starting place" (para. 3).

 

Quebec home daycare worker strike hits parents of 90,000 children

CBC News. (2014, October 20). Quebec home daycare worker strike hits parents of 90,000 childrenCBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news

"Hundreds of home daycare workers honked horns, blew whistles and pounded drums as they marched to Premier Philippe Couillard's downtown Montreal office today as part of their one-day strike" (para. 1).

 

The dilemma between healthy eating and staying above the poverty line

Taber, J. (2014, October 19). The dilemma between healthy eating and staying above the poverty lineThe Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

"More than 1.7 million households, or four million Canadians, are affected by some level of “food insecurity,” which means they can’t, or they constantly worry about being able to, properly feed their families because they lack the means. That’s almost half a million more than five years earlier, according to the latest Statistics Canada data" (para. 4).

 

Feds delay enforcement of new caregiver pay rule

Diament, M. (2014, October 10). Feds delay enforcement of new caregiver pay rule. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"The Obama administration says it will delay enforcement of a new rule granting federal minimum wage and overtime protections to in-home care workers who assist people with disabilities (para. 1).

 

Why cities should deliver a national daycare program

Seth, R. (2014, October 15). Why cities should deliver a national daycare program. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

"Topping the list of 21st century infrastructure investments should be a high-quality national childcare program – the case for which gets stronger ever year – particularly in light of fast changing labour markets, an increasing sense of economic uncertainty and a depressing growth in child poverty" (para. 8).

 

Impaired predication ability may be behind autism

Mohan, G. (2014, October 7). Impaired predication ability may be behind autismDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

"The brain is a biological machine that makes predictions. But what happens when a wrench is thrown in the works, and jams up the ability to foresee the trajectory of a moving object, or what happens after a frown? Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology believe such a wrench lies at the core of autism, a disorder with widely disparate symptoms that strike with varied intensity" (para. 1, 2).

 

We can learn a lot about public policy from the Nordic nations

Scott, A. (2014, October 6). We can learn a lot about public policy from the Nordic nations. The Conversation. Retrieved from http://www.theconversation.com

"At the end of this month Australia’s Productivity Commission will issue the final report of its inquiry into Early Childhood Education and Care" (para. 1).'

 

Olivia Chow challenges Tory, Ford over absence of child-care policy

Dale, D. (2014, October 9). Olivia Chow challenges Tory, Ford over absence of child-care policy. The Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

"Chow says she’s committed to creating at least 3,000 new high-quality child-care spaces in Toronto, where there’s a severe shortage of affordable licensed daycare" (para. 1).

 

Manitoba government announces capital building fund to create additional high-quality, affordable child care for families

Government of Manitoba. (2014, October 2). Manitoba government announces capital building fund to create additional high-quality, affordable child care for familiesGovernment of Manitoba. Retrieved from http://news.gov.mb.ca/

"The Manitoba government is announcing details of the Family Choices Building Fund as part of the recently launched five-year plan to create more high-quality child care for families across the province, Family Services Minister Kerri Irvin-Ross said today" (para. 1).

 

Families may differ, but they share common values on parenting

Parker, K. (2014, September 18). Families may differ, but they share common values on parenting. Pew Research Center. Retrieved from http://www.pewresearch.org/

"A new report released today by the Pew Research Center shows how the values Americans bring to parenting are strongly linked to their own ideological leanings. But aside from ideology, the survey finds widespread agreement among parents over the traits that children should be taught" (para. 1).

 

Due process hearings on decline

Diament, M. (2014, September 25). Due process hearings on declineDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"Fewer special education disputes between parents and school districts are escalating to due process hearings, a new government report finds" (para. 1).

 

Study points to more reliable autism test

Diament, M. (2014, September 23). Study points to more reliable autism testDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"Assessing how quickly the brain responds to sights and sounds could offer a more precise and earlier method to diagnose autism, new research suggests" (para. 2).

 

House passes child care bill

Severns, P. (2014, September 15). House passes child care bill. Politico. Retrieved from http://www.politico.com/

"The House passed a bill to overhaul child care for low-income families Monday, and it will likely become law before the end of the year" (para. 1).

 

Almost a million Canadian kids in poverty is an acute emergency

Ford-Jones, E. (2014, September 8). Almost a million Canadian kids in poverty is an acute emergencyThe Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

"UNICEF’S most recent report on child well-being in rich countries ranked Canada 17 out of 29 countries assessed, scoring 27th in child obesity, 22nd in infant mortality and 21st in child poverty rates. Sadly, this isn’t news. The House of Commons resolved to eradicate child poverty in 1989, but in late 2013, Statistics Canada reported that 967,000 children in this country still lived in low-income homes" (para. 1).

 

Autism services focus of new push

Heasley, S. (2014, September 15). Autism services focus of new pushDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"Federal officials say they’re embarking on a new effort to identify best practices to meet the needs of individuals with autism from childhood to adulthood...The National Institute of Mental Health is doling out $7.9 million in first-year funding for 12 research projects that will assess various models of service delivery for individuals with the developmental disorder at three key stages of life" (para. 1, 2).

 

Poor kids hit hard by BC school strike

Sinclair, J. (2014, September 14). Poor kids hit hard by school strikeCBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news

"During the school year, [nine-year old Vincent] signed up for the Vancouver School Board's hot lunch program. During the strike, that program has been put on hold, and his mother Nicole says providing the extra meal is putting a drain on her already tight budget" (para. 2).

 

Plans to cut parental programs draw scorn in Quebec

Perreau, L. (2014, September 16). Plans to cut parental programs draw scorn in Quebec. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

"The province appears poised to end the province’s $7 daily fee for the public daycare system, drastically cut benefits in Quebec’s parental leave program, and slash spending on education, including money for school boards, milk programs and books, according to recent reports from anonymous sources" (para. 2).

 

Caring for children in Europe: How children, parental leave and flexible working arrangements interact in Europe

Janta, B. (2013). Caring for children in Europe: How children, parental leave and flexible working arrangements interact in Europe. European Platform for Investing in Children (EPIC). Retrieved from http://europa.eu/epic/studies-reports/docs/rr-554-dg-employment-childcare-brief-v-0-16-final.pdf

"The aim of this brief is to shed light on the complex and multi-layered aspects of reconciliation of paid work and care for children, a much debated issue in many European countries, and to inform policy - and decision makers across the EU about current childcare trends and policy developments" (pg. 2).

 

Ontario 'recommits' to tackling child poverty

Artuso, A. (2014, September 3). Ontario 'recommits' to tackling child poverty. Brantford Expositor. Retrieved from http://www.brantfordexpositor.ca

"Deputy Premier Deb Matthews acknowledged Wednesday that her government failed to meet a goal it set in 2008 to reduce child poverty in Ontario by 25% in five years" (para. 2).

 

Inclusion rates for special education students vary by state

Heasley, S. (2014, September 3). Inclusion rates for special education students vary by state. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"Regional differences appear to play a role in education placements for students with autism, with those living in the West more likely to attend mainstream classes while students in the Eastern United States are more frequently assigned to segregated settings" (para. 2).

 

B.C. government softens stand on special needs funding

Hunter, J. (2014, September 5). B.C. government softens stand on special needs funding. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

"The B.C. government is prepared to find more resources to address special needs in the classroom, Education Minister Peter Fassbender said Thursday" (para. 1). 

 

Study: follow-up critical after developmental screenings

Heasley, S. (2014). Study: follow-up critical after developmental screenings. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"Kids with developmental delay are far more likely to receive the early intervention services they need if pediatricians follow up after conducting routine screenings, researchers say" (para. 1). 

 

Kids with autism see big gains with tablets

Diament, M. (2014, September 4). Kids with Autism see big gains with tabletsDisability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/ 

"Even with intervention, many children with autism continue to struggle with communication, but new research suggests that using iPads and other tablets can help maximize language skills" (para. 1). 

 

Teachers strike could financially devastate families with special needs kids

Wintonyk, D. (2014, August 21). Teachers strike could financially devastate families with special needs kids. CTV News Vancouver.  Retrieved from http://bc.ctvnews.ca

This article discusses the financial impact of the teachers' strike upon families that include children with disabilities living in British Columbia.

 

B.C. teachers' strike: parents of special needs kids facing huge bill

CBC News. (2014, August 21). B.C. teachers' strike: parents of special needs kids facing huge bill. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news

A letter from the Simon Fraser Society for Community Living warns parents of children with disabilities living in British Columbia that the province will not pay their child care costs during school hours if the teachers' strike continues in September. 

 

China advised to move toward integrated early childhood development services

staff infoZine. (2014, August 20). China advised to move toward integrated early childhood development services. infoZine. Retrieved from http://www.infozine.com

"China could consider moving toward integrated early childhood development services for all covering prenatal services to services for 0-3 year olds, 3-6 year olds and even aligning with primary school education, and developing related policies and measures, advises a World Bank report" (para. 1).

 

Kindergarten early or late, on parents' minds

CBC News. (2014, August 20). Kindergarten early or late, on parents' minds. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc. ca/news

In Prince Edward Island, parents can choose to enroll their children who will turn five years old by the end of the year in kindergarten or to keep their children out of school for another year.

 

New BC Early Years Centres opening for families

British Columbia Government. (2014, August 19). New BC Early Years Centres opening for families. Retrieved from http:// www.newsroom.gov.bc.ca

"Twelve community organizations throughout the province have been selected to host new BC Early Years Centres that will help support families with children aged 0-6" (para. 2). This web page details the locations of the Centres and the supports that they will offer.

 

Don't throw the nanny out with the bathwater

Omidvar, R. (2014, August 13). Don't throw the nanny out with the bathwater. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

"Live-in caregivers are often a necessary support for Canadians, allowing them to go to work knowing that their babies, toddlers, aging parents or disabled family members are cared for at home. Yet, the Live-in Caregiver Program has come under fire for its alleged misuse by Canadians (primarily of Filipino origin) as a proxy family-reunification program" (para. 1-2).

 

Increasingly, parents push for inclusive playgrounds

Blanchette, A. (2014, August 14). Increasingly, parents push for inclusive playgrounds. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2014/08/14/increasingly-inclusive-playgrounds/19586/

This article provides information about inclusive playground legislation in the United States and describes how inclusive playgrounds are being built in different communities.

 

At granny's house: More children raised by grandparents than before

Collins, L. M. (2014, August 5). At granny's house: More children raised by grandparents than before. Deseret News. Retrieved from http://www.deseretnews.com/

"The number of children being raised by their grandparents shot up, doubling from 2000's 2.4 million to 4.9 million in 2010, according to U.S. Census figures" (para. 1)

 

Don’t throw the nanny out with the bathwater

Omidvar, R. (2014, August 13). Don't throw the nanny out with the bathwater. The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

"Live-in caregivers are often a necessary support for Canadians, allowing them to go to work knowing that their babies, toddlers, aging parents or disabled family members are cared for at home. Yet, the Live-in Caregiver Program has come under fire for its alleged misuse by Canadians (primarily of Filipino origin) as a proxy family-reunification program" (para. 1-2). 

 

Obama signs Autism Act Renewal

Diament, M. (2014, August 11). Obama signs Autism Act Renewal. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/

"With little fanfare, President Barack Obama signed a reauthorization of the nation’s primary autism legislation that includes more than a billion dollars in federal funding for the developmental disorder" (para. 1).

 

Head Start endures, evolves as 50-Year milestone nears

Samuels, C. A. (2014, August 5). Head Start endures, evolves as 50-Year milestone nears. Education Week. Retrieved from http://www.edweek.org

Head Start began in 2015. "Over its nearly half-century in existence, the program has touched more than 31 million infants, toddlers, and other young children by wrapping them and their families in social, educational, and health supports intended to put them on a path out of poverty" (para. 4).

 

Improved parenting may fortify low-income kids against poverty effects

Healy, M. (2014, ). Improved parenting may fortify low-income kids against poverty effects. Retrieved from http://www.latimes.com

"For children growing up in poverty, the seeds of poor health in adulthood appear to be sown early. But a nurturing parent may be able to foster a child's resilience to such conditions as allergies, diabetes, heart disease and some cancers, says a new study" (para. 1).

 

Autism Act wins Senate approval

Diament, M. (2014, August 1). Autism Act wins Senate approval. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

This Article describes the the Autism Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support Act that was approved by the Senate on July 31, 2014.

 

Supreme Court asked to clarify schools’ IDEA obligations

Heasley, S. (2014, July 30). Supreme Court asked to clarify schools’ IDEA obligations. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

"The nation’s school district leaders are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on who should pay for a child’s private school tuition while special education disputes are litigated" (para. 1).

 

Program that helped special needs children on reserves loses funding

CBC News. (2014, July 28). Program that helped special needs children on reserves loses funding. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news

"A Regina-based program that helped special needs children has lost funding from the federal government to provide services to families living on reserves" (para. 1).

 

Special needs students benefit from mainstreaming

Nauert, R. (2014, July 29). Special needs students benefit from mainstreaming. PsychCentral. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/news

"Researchers found that the average language skills of a child’s classmates in the fall significantly predicted the child’s language skills in the spring — especially for children with disabilities" (para. 2).

 

Family income and income of individuals, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2012

Statistics Canada. (2014, July 23). Family income and income of individuals, related variables: Sub-provincial data, 2012. Retrieved from Government of Canada http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140723/dq140723c-eng.htm

"Data for 2012 family income and related variables derived from personal income tax returns filed in spring 2013 are now available for various sub-provincial geographic areas. Total income includes employment income, investment income, government transfers, pension income and other income. The median is the point at which half of the families' incomes are higher and half are lower. . . . All data in this release have been tabulated according to the 2011 Standard Geographical Classification used for the 2011 Census."

 

No more wait lists for disabled in Ontario, all-party report urges

 

Gordon, A. (2014, July 25). No more wait lists for disabled in Ontario, all-party report urges. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

"No more wait lists. One provincial minister in charge. And recognition that all people with developmental disabilities have the right to services they need throughout their lives. Those are the key recommendations in a long-awaited report released at Queen’s Park on Tuesday by the Select Committee on Developmental Services. Calling the situation “urgent,” the all-party committee said it was “deeply troubled and alarmed by the range of barriers confronting persons with developmental disabilities.” As a result, they said, many families “feel pushed to the brink of disaster.”" (para 1-4).

 

TDSB struggles to meet obligations to special education students

Forani, J. (2014, July 25). TDSB struggles to meet obligations to special education students. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

"Many parents of special needs students struggle to find the right school for their child. In Toronto, the decision is often whether to congregate or integrate."

 

Filipino Canadians fear end of immigrant dreams for nannies

Keung, N. (2014, July 22). Filipino Canadians fear end of immigrant dreams for nannies. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com/

"Employment Minister Jason Kenny suggests Ottawa is thinking about major changes to the live-in caregiver program — a move that has the Filipino community bristling. Ottawa’s recent rhetoric about an “out-of-control” live-in caregiver program has prompted outrage in some quarters — and fear that the days of a pathway to permanent residency for foreign nannies are numbered" (para 1).

 

In a changing world of family diversity, kids don’t care where love comes from

McLaren, L. (2014, July 10). In a changing world of family diversity, kids don’t care where love comes from. Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com

In light of two stories that have gone viral, their messages demonstrate "how alternative family models, in which biological parents take a secondary role to non-biological parents, are changing the face of the contemporary family. Whether it’s children born through donor sperm, donor eggs, open adoption, to same-sex or single-parents-by-choice, a rapidly growing number of kids are being born into families where they might have three parents. This in itself is not a new social trend; what is new is the level of openness involved" (para 1).

 

Child care modernization act

Ministry of Education. (2014, July 10). Child care modernization act. Retrieved from http://news.ontario.ca/edu/en/2014/07/child-care-modernization-act-1.html

"The Day Nurseries Act is the legislation that currently governs child care in Ontario. This act originally came into force in 1946 and has not been comprehensively reviewed since 1983. It no longer reflects the child care needs of today's families or the realities of the child care sector" (para 1). This article addresses what the new legislation of the Child Care Modernization Act would achieve.

 

A 'major shift' in oversight of special education

Sanchez, C. (2014, June 24). A 'major shift' in oversight of special educationNational Public Radio. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/blogs/ed/2014/06/24/325229848/a-major-shift-in-oversight-of-special-education

"The Obama administration said Tuesday that the vast majority of the 6.5 million students with disabilities in U.S. schools today are not receiving a quality education, and that it will hold states accountable for demonstrating that those students are making progress . . . . [Education Secretary Arne] Duncan says he is creating a $50 million technical-assistance center to help states comply with the new guidelines. States that fall short could lose federal funding earmarked for special education, which totals about $11.5 billion a year" (para. 1-13). 

 

Canada’s live-in caregiver program ‘ran out of control’ and will be reformed: Jason Kenney

Hough, J. (2014, June 24). Canada’s live-in caregiver program ‘ran out of control’ and will be reformed: Jason Kenney. National Post. Retrieved from http://news.nationalpost.com

This article discusses Canada's live-in caregiver program, which Employment Minister Jason Kenny has said will be reformed.

 

Planned changes to nanny program spark alarm

Robertson, D. (2014, June 26). Planned changes to nanny program spark alarm. Calgary Herald. Retrieved from http://www.calgaryherald.com

"Calgary immigration consultants are bracing for changes to the Live-In Caregiver Program (LCP) they warn will hurt working families at a time when child care is hard to find in the city. It's believed the federal government plans to scale back the program . . . . Though a review of the program was only made public this week, Calgary immigration lawyer Raj Sharma expects changes to come soon" (para. 1).

 

Push to allow subsidies for nannies as childcare means test in frame

Karvelas, P. (2014, July 2). Push to allow subsidies for nannies as childcare means test in frame. National Affairs. Retrieved from http://www.theaustralian.com

"The nation’s childcare system faces a major shake-up, with the Productivity Commission’s draft report suggesting one simplified payment with a means test that tapers down for high income families, as well as allowing parents to claim the payment for the use of nannies" (para. 1).

 

Doctors warn against co-sleeping, but growing number of parents willing to take risk to feel close to their child.

Boesveld, S. (2014, June 20). Doctors warn against co-sleeping, but growing number of parents willing to take risk to feel close to their child. National Post. Retrieved from http://news.nationalpost.com

This article addresses the concerns surrounding co-sleeping with your child and the reasons why parents continue to co-sleep despite the risks.

 

After-school care more likely in Ontario’s affluent neighbourhoods: Report

Rushowy, K. (2014, June 23). After-school care more likely in Ontario’s affluent neighbourhoods: Report. Cambridge Times. Retrieved from http://www.cambridgetimes.ca/news-story/4593503-after-school-care-more-likely-in-ontario-s-affluent-neighbourhoods-report/

"People for Education, in its survey of principals at 1,349 schools across the province, found that in 77 per cent of schools where family incomes are high, before- and after-school care is available, compared to 52 per cent of schools with low family incomes" (para. 5).

 

Obama uses personal experience to advocate for family leave, workplace flexibility

Eilperin, J., & Zezima, K. (2014, June 23). Obama uses personal experience to advocate for family leave, workplace flexibility. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com 

This article addresses how President Obama "An animated President Obama cast the need for flexible workplace policies and paid family leave . . . . Speaking at the White House Summit on Working Families, Obama highlighted the issues that he said working families face each day, including a lack of affordable child care or paid maternity leave and the reluctance of many employers to allow parents to work flexible schedules" (para. 1-2).

 

Autism Act clears house

Diament, M. (2014, June 25). Autism Act clears house. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

"The U.S. House of Representatives approved the Autism Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support Act, or Autism CARES . . . . The measure would renew what’s previously been known as the Combating Autism Act, which provides millions each year in federal funding for research, prevalence tracking, training for professionals, early identification and other autism efforts" (para. 1-2).

 

Teaching schools to develop 'early years hubs'

Gaunt, C. (2014, June 20). Teaching schools to develop 'early years hubs'. Nursery World. Retrieved from http://www.nurseryworld.co.uk

"Twenty teaching school alliances are working together to develop local early years hubs to improve practice in the sector   . . . .Charlie Taylor, chief executive of the National College for Teaching and Leadership explains 'hubs would build on the work being done by teaching school alliances, which bring together early years providers and schools to support, encourage and drive local improvements in quality'" (para. 1).

 

Most states deficient in special education

Diament, M. (2014, June 24). Most states deficient in special education. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

"Federal education officials are dramatically altering the way they evaluate compliance with special education law and the change means far fewer states are living up to expectations" (para. 1).

 

What's in a label? In special ed, words matter

Drummond, S. (2014, June 13). What's in a label? In special ed, words matter. National Public Radio. Retrieved from
http://www.npr.org/

"We're reporting this week on special education, which means inevitably we run up against questions of how we should refer to students with disabilities and to the disabilities themselves.

It's a minefield, comparable to the tensions and complexity of writing about race and ethnicity" (para. 1-2). The article includes a link to a style guide prepared by National Public Radio.

 

White House announces new initiatives to help working families

Schulte, B. (2014, June 23). White House announces new initiatives to help working families. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com

"President Obama will announce a series of proposals on Monday morning aimed at easing the competing demands of work and caregiving for families, including more workplace flexibility, early childhood education, equal access to benefits for same-sex married couples and a push for paid parental leave" (para. 1).

 

Schools may be underreporting restraint, seclusion

Heasley, S. (2014, June 20). Schools may be underreporting restraint, seclusion. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

"During the 2011-2012 school year, there were more than 267,000 instances of restraint and seclusion reported by the nation’s schools. The figure is believed to be low, however.

The numbers come from an analysis by the nonprofit news organization ProPublica, which crunched data collected by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Civil Rights" (para. 2-3).

 

B.C. prison babies born behind bars to stay with mothers

CBC News. (2014, June 18). B.C. prison babies born behind bars to stay with mothers. CBC News. Retrieved from http://www.cbc.ca/news

"Women who have babies while in jail will now be allowed to keep their newborns with them in prison.

The province has re-established its Mother-Child Program at Alouette Correctional Centre for Women, on orders from the British Columbia Supreme Court" (para. 1-2).

 

Child care bank now available

Voss, M. (2014, June 16). Child care bank now available. Sherwood Park News. Retrieved from http://www.sherwoodparknews.com

"Strathcona County residents now have access to a child care information bank, the first of its kind in Alberta" (para. 1).

 

Should charter schools enroll more special education students?

Lake, R. (n.d.). Should charter schools enroll more special education students? Education Next. Retrieved from http://educationnext.org/should-charter-schools-enroll-more-special-education-students/

Three education experts provide their perspective on whether charter schools in the United States should enroll more students in special education classrooms.

 

Congress to ‘combat’ Autism no more

Diament, M. (2014, June 12). Congress to ‘combat’ Autism no more. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

"Lawmakers said this week that they will no longer seek to include the term 'combating' in the title of the nation’s primary autism legislation. A bill to reauthorize hundreds of millions of dollars in federal spending for prevalence tracking, research, early identification efforts and other autism initiatives will move forward under a new name — the Autism Collaboration, Accountability, Research, Education and Support Act, or Autism CARES" (para. 1-2).

 

Don’t Call them Mr. Mom: More Dads at home with kids because they want to be

Schulte, J. (2014, June 5). Don’t call them Mr. Mom: More dads at home with kids because they want to be. The Washington Post. Retrieved from http://www.washingtonpost.com

"The number of stay-at-home Dads has doubled in the last 25 years, reaching a peak of 2.2 million in 2010, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center. And although the Great Recession contributed to a sharp uptick, by far, the fastest growing segment of at-home Dads say they’re home taking care of the kids because they want to be" (para 1).

 

Medicaid funds increasingly going to community-based services

Heasley, S. (2014, May 27). Medicaid funds increasingly going to community-based services. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com

“Spending on home and community-based services is on the rise as fewer dollars go to institutions, a new federal government report finds. Nationally, Medicaid funding for long-term services and supports remained largely stagnant in 2012 but increasingly that money is being directed to services in the community” (para. 1-2).

 

How technology could threaten Deaf identity

DeHahn, P. (2014, May 16). How technology could threaten Deaf identity. The Atlantic. Retrieved from http://www.theatlantic.com

"Hearing aids and cochlear implants have improved the lives of the oral deaf, people with hearing loss who speak and may read lips rather than signing. But as technology advances, deaf people may soon have cochlear implants that are invisible to observers, which could challenge the community’s identity" (para 1). 

 

Councillor Doug Ford's group home comments shock and sadden autism advocates

Monsebraaten, L. (2014, May 20). Councillor Doug Ford's group home comments shock and sadden autism advocates. The Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

"Doug Ford accused a group home sheltering three autistic young adults of "ruining" the neighbourhood, with no factual support for the assertion. Disability advocates say the comments are a throwback to a repudiated era when people with disabilities were hidden away in institutions" (para. 1).

 

The great divide: To reduce inequality, start with families

Warner, J. (2014, April 20). To reduce inequality, start with families. The New York Times. Retrieved from
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com

"However it’s worded, the message is clear: If we want to strike at the roots of inequality in America, we’ve got to start at its source, in the family, at the very beginning of children’s lives" (para. 7).

 

In Chinese schools, disabled get shortchanged

Farrar, L. (2014, May 18). In Chinese schools, disabled get shortchanged. New York Times. Retrieved from www.nytimes.com 

"China has approximately 85 million people with disabilities, according to the United Nations. Experts in the field, including professors of special education, human-rights officials and lawyers representing the disabled, say that the Chinese government, despite some progress, is not doing enough to ensure that people with disabilities have equitable access to higher education — or really any education at all" (para. 4).

 

Study: Living arrangements of children in Canada, 1901 to 2011

Statistics Canada. (2014) Study: Living arrangements of children in Canada, 1901 to 2011. The Daily. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien

"In this release, data from the 1901 to 2011 censuses of population are used to examine the trends in living arrangements of children, who are defined as individuals aged 24 and under living as children in census families in private households" (p. 1).

 

How everything we know about early childhood has changed since Head Start was founded

Ross, J., & Sullivan, A. (2014, April 18). How everything we know about early childhood has changed since Head Start was founded. National Journal. Retrieved from: http://www.nationaljournal.com

This article addresses how "research over the past 50 years has changed both theories and policies on what kind of early interventions for disadvantaged children are most effective" (para 1).

 

One approach to Head Start: To help kids, help their parents

Westervelt, E. (2014, April 23). One approach to Head Start: To help kids, help their parents. National Public Radio. Retrieved from http://www.npr.org/

"Organizers at the nonprofit Community Action Project of Tulsa County run a particular take on Head Start called Career Advance, and the idea behind it is simple: To help kids, you often have to help their parents" (para. 3).

 

Special needs kids often told to stay home from school, says People for Education report

Rushowy, K. (2014, April 28). Special needs kids often told to stay home from school, says People for Education report. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from www.thestar.com

This article includes responses from the Toronto District School Board and Education Minister Liz Sandals regarding People for Education's report on special education.

 

The return of the stay-at-home mother

The return of the stay-at-home mother. (2014, April 19). The Economist. Retrieved from http://www.economist.com/news

In the United States of America, "the proportion of stay-at-home mothers has been rising steadily for the past 15 years, according to new data crunched by the Pew Research Centre" (para. 2).

 

Request for Information (RFI): Impact of DSM-5 changes to diagnostic criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) on research and services

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. (2014). Request for Information (RFI): Impact of DSM-5 changes to diagnostic criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) on research and services. Retrieved from http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-HD-14-012.html

"The purpose of this request for information is to seek input from the scientific community, health professionals, self-advocates and patient advocates about the research implications of recent changes to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)" (Purpose section, para. 1).

 

Early Years Centres open in three communities

Province of Nova Scotia Education and Early Childhood Development. (2014). Early Years Centres open in three communities. Retrieved from http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20140407001

"Education and Early Childhood Development Minister Karen Casey and Margaret McCain, chair of the Margaret and Wallace McCain Family Foundation, officially opened the province's first early years centres . . ." (para. 2).

 

Ontario teachers seek smaller class sizes, especially with more special-needs kids

Rushowy, K. (2014, April 2). Ontario teachers seek smaller class sizes, especially with more special-needs kids. The Toronto Star. Retrieved from http://www.thestar.com

"Class sizes should be adjusted to take into account the number of special-needs students, so that teachers can give all children the attention they need, says the union representing Ontario’s elementary teachers in its new education agenda" (para. 1).

 

Families, students, seniors get boost in deficit budget

Antle, R. (2014, March 27). Families, students, seniors get boost in deficit budget. CBCnews. Retrieved from www.cbc.ca/news

"The Newfoundland and Labrador government is offering up new and enhanced benefits for families, seniors and students in this year's budget, while adding more than a half-billion dollars’ worth of red ink to the province's tab" (para. 1).

 

New 'trauma-informed' approach to behavioral disorders in special education

Adams, J. M. (2014, February 3). New 'trauma-informed' approach to behavioral disorders in special education. EdSource. Retrieved from http://edsource.org/

"The three-year pilot program will test the theory that training adults in a school community about the effects of trauma on young minds will help all students at school socially and academically, especially special education students with emotional and behavioral disorders" (Three-year pilot program section, para. 2).

 

Provincial office for the Early Years launched

Ministry of Children and Family Development. (2014, January 31). Provincial office for the Early Years launched. British Columbia Newsroom. Retrieved from http://www.newsroom.gov.bc.ca/2014/01/provincial-office-for-the-early-years-launched.html

"The new Provincial Office for the Early Years will focus on the needs of families with children up to age six and help ensure they have easy access to a range of early-years services no matter where they live in B.C., announced Minister of Children and Family Development Stephanie Cadieux at the UBC Early Years Conference in Vancouver" (para 1).

 

Backgrounder: Ontario's healthy kids strategy

Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. (2014). Backgrounder: Ontario's healthy kids strategy. Retrieved from http://news.ontario.ca/mohltc/en/2014/01/ontarios-healthy-kids-strategy.html

Ontario's Healthy Kids Strategy, a response to recommendations from the Healthy Kids Panel, focuses on three priorities:

  • "Healthy Start - supporting healthy pregnancy and early years to build the foundation for healthy childhood and beyond.
  • Healthy Food - initiatives to promote healthy eating, achieving healthy weights and healthy childhood development.
  • Healthy Active Communities - building healthy environments for kids in their communities" (para. 2). 

 

'Wellbeing improved' if children with autism recruit imaginary helpers

MacGill, M. (2014, January 9). 'Wellbeing improved' if children with autism recruit imaginary helpers. Medical News Today. Retrieved from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com

"Researchers believe they have developed a psychological technique that improves the mental wellbeing of children with autism - through an activity that invents tiny characters the kids can then imagine are in their heads helping them out with their thoughts" (para. 4).  

 

After school programming "life-changing"

BC Government. (2013, December 13). After school programming "life-changing". Retrieved from http://www.newsroom.gov.bc.ca

"After school sport and arts programming for vulnerable kids is getting $2 million to double the existing number of program spaces up to 15,000 announced Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural Development Coralee Oakes today as she visited Harwin Elementary School" (para. 1).

 

Bill 143, Child Care Modernization Act, 2013

Bill 143, Child Care Modernization Act, 2013. (2013). 1st reading Dec. 3 2013, 41st Parliament, 2nd Session. Retrieved from the Legislative Assembly of Ontario website: http://www.ontla.on.ca/web/bills/bills_detail.do?locale=en&Intranet=&BillID=2913

If enacted, the Child Care Modernization Act (2013) will introduce the Child Care and Early Years Act, 2013, repeal the Day Nurseries Act, and amend both the Early Childhood Educators Act (2007) and the Education Act. The first reading of Bill 143 passed.

 

DEC recommended practices: Opportunity for field input on the recommended practices

The Division for Early Childhood. (2013). DEC recommended practices commission workspace. Retrieved from http://www.decrecpractices.org/input.asp

The DEC Recommended Practices Commission collected feedback on a draft revised set of recommended practices. This revised set will be available until the final set is disseminated.

 

Canadian Survey on Disability, 2012

Statistics Canada. (2013, December 3). Canadian Survey on Disability, 2012. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/dai-quo/index-eng.htm?HPA

Key findings from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability are presented.

 

New Brunswick adopts policy on inclusive education

Canadian Association for Community Living. (2013, November 26). New Brunswick adopts policy on inclusive education. Retrieved from http://inclusiveeducation.ca/

New Brunswick’s first official policy on inclusive education was signed on September 17, 2013, after 27 years of inclusive education. Policy 322 incorporates existing principles and practices and establishes new objectives for school, teachers, parents, and education officials.

 

B.C. probing reports of special-needs children restrained in schools

Smart, A. (2013, November 21). B.C. probing reports of special-needs children restrained in schools. Times Colonist. Retrieved from http://www.timescolonist.com

The province of British Columbia is investigating after dozens of parents reported, in a survey by Inclusion BC, that their children were restrained or secluded at school for disruptive behaviour.

 

Early Years Centre sites announced

Province of Nova Scotia. (2013). Early Years Centre sites announced. Retrieved from http://novascotia.ca/news/release/?id=20130822003

Nova Scotia announces the opening of early years centres in four communities.

 

Military Family Services announces expanded Family Information Line

National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. (2013). Military Family Services announces expanded Family Information Line. Retrieved from http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/news/article.page?doc=military-family-services-announces-expanded-family-information-line/hmhfyfxe

The Family Information Line now operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Trained counsellors offer information, referrals, and confidential counseling to Canadian Armed Forces families via phone and e-mail, in English and in French.

 

Canada must find ways to prevent postpartum-depression deaths

Canada must find ways to prevent postpartum-depression deaths [Editorial].  (2013). The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://www.theglobeandmail.com/

This editorial advocates screening for postpartum depression in order to promote maternal and child health and to prevent deaths due to psychiatric illness.