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I am safe and secure: Promoting resilience in young children

Pizzolongo, P., & Hunter A. (2011).  I am safe and secure: Promoting resilience in young children.  NAEYC. Retrieved from http://www.naeyc.org/content/i-am-safe-and-secure-promoting-resilience-young-children
 
“The longitudinal studies of researchers like Emmy Werner have reported characteristics in young children that are associated with “coping abilities under adverse conditions” (Werner 1995, 82). According to Werner, infants who are “active, affectionate, cuddly, good-natured, and easy to deal with” are more likely to be resilient in the face of adversity. Other researchers have noted that infants and toddlers who show resilience are “alert, easy to soothe, and able to elicit support from a nurturant family member” (p. 82). Resilient preschoolers’ characteristics include the ability to be autonomous and to ask for help when needed—characteristics that are also predictive of resilience in later years” (p. 67).

“Other studies have found additional factors to be associated with resilience in young children. For example, Breslin has studied children who seem to be adequately “adapting and surviving,” despite the negative life events and stress they experience. She has identified four characteristics that resilient children exhibit: heightened sensory awareness, high positive expectations, a clear and developing understanding of one’s strengths relating to accomplishment, and a heightened, developing sense of humor (Breslin 2005)” (p. 67).

 

Growing up resilient: Ways to build resilience in children and youth

CAMH. (2012). Growing up resilient: Ways to build resilience in children and youth. Retrieved from http://www.camh.ca/

“Resilience is an important aspect of mental well-being. The authors consider the development of resilience at three levels: individual, family and environmental. Bouncing back from today’s stresses is one of the best life skills children and youth can develop. Growing Up Resilient is a must-read for adults (including parents, teachers and front-line workers) who want to increase resilience in the children and youth in their lives” (para. 1).

Ten tips for raising resilient children

Tartakovsky, M. (2016). Ten tips for raising resilient children. Psych. Central. Retrieved from https://psychcentral.com/lib/10-tips-for-raising-resilient-kids/
 
“Resilience isn’t birthright. It can be taught. Lyons encouraged parents to equip their kids with the skills to handle the unexpected, which actually contrasts our cultural approach.... We have become a culture of trying to make sure our kids are comfortable. We as parents are trying to stay one step ahead of everything our kids are going to run into.” The problem? “Life doesn’t work that way" (paras. 5-6). 

"Anxious people have an especially hard time helping their kids tolerate uncertainty, simply because they have a hard time tolerating it themselves. “The idea of putting your child through the same pain that you went through is intolerable,” Lyons said. So anxious parents try to protect their kids and shield them from worst-case scenarios.
However, a parent’s job isn’t to be there all the time for their kids, she said. It’s to teach them to handle uncertainty and to problem-solve. Below, Lyons shared her valuable suggestions for raising resilient kids” (paras 7-8).

 

Building resilience to cope with stress

O’Grady, L. (n.d.). Building resilience to cope with stress. Kids Matter. Retrieved from https://www.kidsmatter.edu.au/health-and-community/enewsletter/building-resilience-cope-stress

“Building resilience really comes through the development of social and emotional skills, which include coping skills. These are the same skills that will help children deal with stress, so it follows that building resilience will really help kids deal with stress. When teaching social and emotional skills (such as understanding and managing emotions, getting along with friends, and making good decisions), it can be useful to draw on some of the actual stressors that children are facing in their real worlds. Schools have a range of social and emotional learning initiatives they use to explicitly teach these skills and practise them throughout the school day. This way, they can learn practical skills to use in the real world. It’s also important not to ignore basics like helping children sleep and eat well, as we know these are associated with stress” (para. 6).

“School staff and parents can play a really important part in their modelling and approach during stressful times. Children learn (and take cues) from the adults around them, so it’s important for adults to be mindful of how they approach stressful situations and the skills they use to resolve challenges. They can also play an active role in supporting children during stressful times. They can do this by facilitating problem-solving steps to work through situations positively. Over time, these skills can then be developed by the child so they are able to more independently resolve difficulties. Chatting about what happened afterwards can also help to reinforce the learning and remind the child that things can turn out okay even when it’s been a bit stressful” (para. 7).

 

Resilience in development: The importance of early childhood

Masten, A., Gewirtz, A., Sapienza, J. (2012). Resilience in development: The importance of early childhood. Encyclopedia of Early Childhood Development. Retrieved from http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/resilience/according-experts/resilience-development-importance-early-childhood

 “Resilience, from the Latin resilire (to rebound, recoil, or spring back), is a general concept that can be defined broadly as follows: The capacity of a dynamic system to withstand or recover from significant challenges that threaten its stability, viability, or development.1-3 This concept is widely applied in ecology, engineering, communications, disaster management, and other fields.4 In the science of human development, resilience usually refers to pathways or processes leading to positive adaptation or development manifested in the context of adverse experiences” (para. 1).

“Although people have been fascinated with stories of resilience for thousands of years, judging from ancient tales of individuals who triumph over adversity, the scientific study of resilience only began in the 1960s and 1970s.1-3,5 Nonetheless, great strides have been made in the past five decades of research and it is clear that early childhood is an important window of time for understanding and promoting resilience.6-9 During these years, the roots of competence are established and many of the most important protective systems for human development emerge. These early years hold great promise for interventions to prevent and reduce risk, boost resources, promote competence and build a strong foundation for future development”  (para. 2).

 

The 7 Cs: The essential building blocks of resilience


Fostering Resilience. (2017). The 7 Cs: The essential building blocks of resilience. Retrieved from http://www.fosteringresilience.com/7cs.php

“The 7 Cs are an adaptation from The Positive Youth Development movement. Rick Little and colleagues at The International Youth Foundation first described the 4 Cs of confidence, competence, connection, and character as the key ingredients needed to ensure a healthy developmental path. They later added contribution because youth with these essential 4 characteristics also contributed to society.  The additional two C’s – coping and control – allow the model to both promote healthy development and prevent risk.”

 

Resilience

About Kids Health. (2012). Resilience. Sick Kids Hospital. Retrieved from http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/En/HealthAZ/FamilyandPeerRelations/BehaviourManagement/Pages/Resilience.aspx

“Developmental psychologists agree that some children develop resilience through natural process, while others need assistance. However, this doesn’t mean that those who require a little help will be less resilient over time compared to their counterparts. It’s important for parents to remember that cultivating resilience is dependent on many factors and can take some time. Finally, a child’s expression of sadness and/or emotional distress, particularly following a traumatic event, is normal” (para. 2).

 

Building resilience in young children: Booklet for parents of children from birth to six years


Best Start. (n.d.). Building resilience in young children: Booklet for parents of children from birth to six years. Retrieved from https://www.beststart.org/resources/hlthy_chld_dev/pdf/BSRC_Resilience_English_fnl.pdf

“Building Resilience in Young Children is a resource to help you boost your child’s ability to bounce back from life’s challenges and thrive. It is filled with:

• up-to-date information
• helpful tips
• parent stories
• links to other resources
 
The ideas and resources are based on research and have been tested by parents. The stories were provided by parents of young children. These parents hope that their experiences will help you and your family get through life’s ups and downs” (p. 1).

 

In brief: The science of resilience

Center on the Developing Child. (2017). In brief: The science of resilience. Harvard University. Retrieved from https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/from-best-practices-to-breakthrough-impacts/

“Reducing the effects of significant adversity on young children’s healthy development is critical to the progress and prosperity of any society. Yet not all children experience lasting harm as a result of adverse early experiences. Some may demonstrate “resilience,” or an adaptive response to serious hardship. A better understanding of why some children do well despite early adversity is important because it can help us design policies and programs that help more children reach their full potential” (para. 1).

“One way to understand the development of resilience is to visualize a balance scale or seesaw. Protective experiences and adaptive skills on one side counterbalance significant adversity on the other. Resilience is evident when a child’s health and development are tipped in the positive direction, even when a heavy load of factors is stacked on the negative side. Understanding all of the influences that might tip the scale in the positive direction is critical to devising more effective strategies for promoting healthy development in the face of significant disadvantage. When positive experiences outweigh negative experiences, a child’s “scale” tips toward positive outcomes” (para. 2).

 

From best practices to breakthrough impacts

Center on the Developing Child. (2017). From best practices to breakthrough impacts. Harvard University. Retrieved from https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/from-best-practices-to-breakthrough-impacts/

“Experiences in the earliest years of life form the foundation of brain architecture, for better or for worse. Learning, behavior, and health across the lifespan are all built on that foundation. We know today’s best programs and practices can help support child development, but too many children are left behind. Dramatic improvements for all children are not only achievable but also necessary for a thriving and sustainable society. Like any healthy field, ours needs an investment in R&D to move beyond the best of what we know now—to apply cutting-edge science and an innovation mindset to the urgent task of creating the better best practices of tomorrow” (para. 1).

“This report is for anyone who shares our sense of constructive dissatisfaction with the status quo. Whether from the worlds of policy, practice, research, philanthropy, or civic leaders and parents who want to make their communities a better place for children, this is an invitation to join a journey of discovery. Leveraging what we are learning from science to generate and test new ideas is a critical, untapped key to unlocking these dramatic improvements” (para. 2).

 

Tipping the scales: The resilience game

Center on the Developing Child. (2017). Tipping the scales: The resilience game. Harvard University. Retrieved from https://developingchild.harvard.edu/resources/resilience-game/

“In this interactive feature, you will learn how the choices we make can help children and the community as a whole become more resilient in the face of serious challenges. Negative events can occur at any moment, and it’s your job to choose positive events to counteract these negatives. View Key Concepts: Resilience to learn more about the science of resilience” (para. 1).

 

Resilience

Center on the Developing Child. (2017). Resilience. Harvard University. Retrieved from https://developingchild.harvard.edu/science/key-concepts/resilience/

“Reducing the effects of significant adversity on children’s healthy development is essential to the progress and prosperity of any society. Science tells us that some children develop resilience, or the ability to overcome serious hardship, while others do not. Understanding why some children do well despite adverse early experiences is crucial, because it can inform more effective policies and programs that help more children reach their full potential” (para. 1).

 

Building resilience in children

Healthy Children. (2015). Building resilience in children. Retrieved from https://healthychildren.org/English/healthy-living/emotional-wellness/Building-Resilience/Pages/Building-Resilience-in-Children.aspx

“In today’s environment, children and teens need to develop strengths, acquire skills to cope, recover from hardships, and be prepared for future challenges. They need to be resilient in order to succeed in life” (para. 5).

“That is why Kenneth Ginsburg, M.D., MS Ed, FAAP, a pediatrician specializing in adolescent medicine at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), has joined forces with the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) to author A Parent’s Guide to Building Resilience in Children and Teens: Giving Your Child Roots and Wings. The new book provides a dynamic resource to help parents and caregivers build resilience in children, teens, and young adults” (para. 6).

“Dr. Ginsburg has identified seven “C”s of resilience, recognizing that “resilience isn’t a simple, one-part entity.” Parents can use these guidelines to help their children recognize their abilities and inner resources” (para. 7).

 

A guide to promoting resilience in children: Strengthening the human spirit


Grotberg, E. (1995). A guide to promoting resilience in children: Strengthening the human spirit. Retrieved from https://bibalex.org/baifa/Attachment/Documents/115519.pdf

“The main body of this book is a practical Guide that will help adults to promote resilience in children. In this introduction, we discuss some background behind the concept of resilience and give a brief description of the International Resilience Project. The Guide itself is based on research findings from this project” (p. 7).

“The project set out to examine what parents, care givers or children do that seems to promote resilience. It is thus concerned with promoting resilience in children as they develop over time, without the need for some kind of pathology in the family or child. Furthermore, the basic unit for the study is the child in context” (p. 7).

 

The influence of music on the development of children


Chau, C. & Riforgiate, T. (2010).  The influence of music on the development of children. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1009&context=psycdsp

“Music can be found in every culture all around the world.  Music has become such a big part of our lives that researchers can't help but want to study how music affects people, especially children.  Many parents, teachers, scholars, and businesses are interested in learning more about the influence of music on the development of children…. Other research showed that even a little bit of musical training can enhance reading skills as well as pitch discrimination abilities in speech (Moreno, Marques, Santos, Santos, Castro, & Besson 2009” (p. 1).

 

Why making music matters: Music and early childhood development


Carnegie Hall. (2017). Why making music matters: Music and early childhood development. Retrieved from https://www.carnegiehall.org/Blog/2016/01/Why-Making-Music-Matters-Music-and-Early-Childhood-Development

“To better understand the effect of music in early childhood development, Carnegie Hall commissioned a new research paper from Dr. Dennie Palmer Wolf, an expert in the field. Titled “Why Making Music Matters,” her research points to several key reasons why investing in children early and often is critical to healthy development and a successful future—and that music can play a role in everyday interactions that support our next generation. The following is a summary of Dr. Wolf’s findings” (para. 1).

 


The importance of music for young children

Hendry, I. (2012). The importance of music for young children. Retrieved from http://www.childandfamilyopp.org/the-importance-of-music-for-young-children/

“Children enjoy music from the minute they are born. This is especially true of music they heard when they were still in the womb.  They are attracted to rhythm, tempo, and the beat of the music.  Just like all of us, music can make children feel happy or calm, it can make then feel sleepy, or it can inspire them to get up and dance.  Children love movement and when they are listening to music, they are swaying, bouncing, dancing, marching and clapping.  They are having fun, and at the same time developing important motor skills” (para. 2).

4

The power of music: Its impact on the intellectual, social and personal development of children and young people

Hallam, S. (2010). The power of music: Its impact on the intellectual, social and personal development of children and young people. International Journal of Music Education, 28(3), 269-289. doi:10.1177/0255761410370658

“This paper reviews the empirical evidence relating to the effects of active engagement with music on the intellectual, social and personal development of children and young people. It draws on research using the most advanced technologies to study the brain, in addition to quantitative and qualitative psychological and educational studies….. It suggests that the positive effects of engagement with music on personal and social development only occur if it is an enjoyable and rewarding experience. This has implications for the quality of the teaching” (p. 269).

 

The effect of early music training on child cognitive development

Bilhartz, T. D., Bruhn, R. A., & Olson, J. E. (1999). The effect of early music training on child cognitive development. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 20(4), 615-636. doi:10.1016/S0193-3973(99)00033-7
 
“In a 1987 historiographical essay, Draper and Gayle (1987) detailed the history ofAmerican attitudes toward the social value of music education. According to their study, the idea that early musical instruction produces benefits beyond the realm of the arts has been circulating for more than a century. The primary justifications used to promote early musical training, however, have changed over time. Of the traditional justifications given to support childhood musical study, the only rationale that has increased significantly among supporters of the arts during the late twentieth century is the premise that music promotes cognitive development and abstract thought” … This study suggests a significant correspondence between early music instruction and spatial–temporal reasoning abilities” (p. 615).

 

Impact of music therapy to promote positive parenting and child development

Nicholson, J. M., Berthelsen, D., Abad, V., Williams, K., & Bradley, J. (2008). Impact of music therapy to promote positive parenting and child development. Journal of Health Psychology, 13(2), 226-238. doi:10.1177/1359105307086705
 
“The effectiveness of a 10-week group music therapy program for marginalized parents and their children aged 0–5 years was examined. Musical activities were used to promote positive parent–child relationships and children’s behavioral, communicative and social development. Participants were 358 parents and children from families facing social disadvantage, young parents or parents of a child with a disability. Significant improvements were found for therapist-observed parent and child behaviors, and parent-reported irritable parenting, educational activities in the home, parent mental health and child communication and social play skills. This study provides evidence of the potential effectiveness of music therapy for early intervention” (p. 226).

 

Effects of music training on the child's brain and cognitive development

Schlaug, G., Norton, A., Overy, K., & Winner, E. (2005). Effects of music training on the child's brain and cognitive development. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1060(1), 219-230. doi:10.1196/annals.1360.015
 
“Research has revealed structural and functional differences in the brains  of  adult  instrumental  musicians  compared  to  those  of  matched  non-musician controls, with intensity/duration of instrumental training and practice   being   important   predictors   of these   differences.   Nevertheless, the differential contributions of nature and nurture to these differences are not yet clear. Here we report the initial results from our studies examining the brain and cognitive effects of instrumental music training on young children in a longitudinal study and a cross-sectional comparison in older children. Further, we present a comparison of the results in these children’s studies with observations from our cross-sectional studies with adult” (p. 219).

 

Does participation in music and performing arts influence child development?

Foster, E. M., & Marcus Jenkins, J. V. (2017). Does participation in music and performing arts influence child development? American Educational Research Journal, 54(3), 399-443. doi:10.3102/0002831217701830
 
“This article reconsiders the association between childhood arts participation and cognitive and developmental outcomes. Using data from a large, nationally representative sample with extensive covariates, we employ propensity score weighting to adjust comparisons of children who do and do not participate in arts education (music and performing arts lessons) to address potential confounding from selection into arts education…. Our results show that selection into arts education is at least as strong as any direct effect on outcomes, providing no support for the causal associations between arts participation and cognitive outcomes. We do find that arts education increases arts engagement during young adulthood” (p. 399).

 

The power of musical play: The value of play-based, child-centered curriculum in early childhood music education.


Niland, A. (2009). The power of musical play: The value of play-based, child-centered curriculum in early childhood music education. General Music Today. (23)1. 17-21.

"Young children learn through play. This has long been acknowledged in the writings of educational theorists dating back as far as Rousseau, Pestalozzi, and Froebel and is strongly supported by current early childhood research. Play is at the heart of contemporary early childhood pedagogy, and this has led to a strong belief in the importance of an emergent, child-centered approach to curriculum. Although music educators commonly recognize the importance of making music enjoyable, music education pedagogy for young children is often teacher led and structured toward specific behavioral outcomes. Research has shown, however, that child-centered musical play can be a powerful medium for young children’s exploration of many musical elements and concepts" (p. 17).

 

How is music used in special education?

Masters in special education. (2017). How is music used in special education? Retrieved from https://www.masters-in-special-education.com/faq/how-is-music-therapy-used-in-special-education/

“Music therapy has proven to be effective in special education for students with various types of disabilities and special needs. This type of therapy can be used in different ways, depending on each individual child” (para. 1).

“Music has also proven to help students with special needs behave appropriately, interact with others, relax the muscles and provide a distraction from pain, anxiety and discomfort. When recognized as a related service, therapy associated with music can help students with special needs to meet educational goals as set by their Individualized Education Program (IEP)” (para. 6).

 

Children and music: Benefits of music in child development

Bright Horizons. (2017). Children and music: Benefits of music in child development. Retrieved from https://www.brighthorizons.com/family-resources/e-family-news/2010-music-and-children-rhythm-meets-child-development

“From birth, parents instinctively use music to calm and soothe children, to express their love and joy, and to engage and interact. Parents can build on these natural instincts by learning how music can impact child development, improve social skills, and benefit kids of all ages” (para. 2).

 

The importance of music in early childhood education

HAFFA. (2016). The importance of music in early childhood education. Retrieved from http://hafha.com/the-importance-of-music-in-early-childhood-education/

" The value of music in education has been recognized for centuries. Even in ancient times without the benefit of all today’s scientific research, the Greek Philosopher Plato recognized the importance of music in education. While early childhood music education creates a foundation upon which future music learning is built, music affects all learning and creative thought. Early interaction with music is important to a young child’s growth and development and can positively affect the quality of their life" (para. 1).

 

The importance of music in early childhood

Levinowitz, L. (1998). The importance of music in early childhood. Retrieved from https://www.musictogether.com/about/research-and-development/researched-based-program/importance-of-music-in-early-childhood

" The media's popularization of findings from studies indicating a causal link between music training and spatial reasoning in young children (Rauscher et al. 1993, 1997) has caught the attention of many and spurred interest in the inclusion of music in early childhood education. Curriculum models that substantiate this point of view are credible; however, music educators need to remind decision makers about other valid reasons for teaching music in the early childhood curriculum. The purpose of this article is to survey some of the work in music education that validates the inclusion of music for its own sake in models for early childhood learning" (para. 1).

 

The importance of music in early childhood education

Steinhoff, A. (2016). The importance of music in early childhood education. Novak Djokovic Foundation. Retrieved from https://novakdjokovicfoundation.org/importance-music-early-childhood-development/

“Research undertaken by a team of researchers in the 1990s showed that the exposure to music from early childhood onwards helps children to speak more clearly, develop a larger vocabulary, and strengthen social and emotional skills. The psychologist Howard Gardner already argued in 1983 that music intelligence is as important as logical and emotional intelligence. This is because music has the ability to strengthen the connection between the body and brain to work together as a team. For instance, when dancing and moving to music, children develop better motor skills whereas singing along to a song helps them to practise their singing voice. In general, the exposure to music supports children in their development process to learn the sound of tones and words” (para. 1).

 

Breaking barriers: How to help children's centres reach disadvantaged families

Royston, S. & Rodrigues, L. (2013). Breaking barriers: How to help children's centres reach disadvantaged families. The Children's Society. Retrieved from https://www.childrenssociety.org.uk/sites/default/files/tcs/breaking_barriers_report.pdf

"This report addresses these barriers and considers what children’s centres, local authorities and central government can do to help break them down. There is no single definition of disadvantaged families and there are many different factors which can contribute to social disadvantage. Through discussions with our children’s centre practitioners, we have developed a list of families that can be particularly disadvantaged, including families with teenage parents, families from minority ethnic communities, families where the parents or children are disabled, etc." (p. 6). 

 

The role of families in health promotion: Family wisdom about health and wellness knowledge, strategies, and barriers

Carroll, L. & Vickers, M. (2014). The role of  families in health promotion: Family wisdom about health and wellness knowledge, strategies, and barriers. Retrieved from Family Voices http://www.familyvoices.org/admin/miscdocs/files/TheWisdom-of-Families_10-07-2014.pdf

"Family Voices believes in the power of research informed directly by families. Such research can lead to enduring practices adopted by both families and health professionals. Over the course of three years (2011-2014), through focus and discussion groups and a health survey, culturally diverse families shared their perspectives and priorities about wellness and prevention. What families want – a holistic approach to health and wellbeing – fits well with the overarching spectrum of health promotion topics found in the Bright Futures Health Promotion recommendations" (1). 

 

Parent support programs and outcomes for children

Goodson, B. (2014). Parent support programs and outcomes for children. Encyclopedia of Early Childhood Development. Retrieved from http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/parenting-skills/according-experts/parent-support-programs-and-outcomes-children

“Parent support programs seek to influence children’s outcomes by motivating changes in parents through a variety of social and practical supports, including case management that links families with services, education on child development and parenting practices, and social support through relationships with service staff and with other parents. Some programs for low-income families are also concerned with improving the economic self-sufficiency of families and providing support for parents in obtaining additional education, finding jobs or delaying subsequent pregnancies” (para. 2).

 

Parenting skills: How can parenting programs support children’s development?

Encyclopedia of Early Childhood Development. (n.d.). Parenting skills: How can parenting programs support children’s development? 
Retrieved from http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/parenting-skills/synthesis 
 
“A large number of parent support programs exist to strengthen parenting skills and promote the development of new competencies. Parent support programs have a common goal— to improve the lives of children and their parents — and a shared strategy — to affect children by creating changes in parents’ attitudes, knowledge and/or behaviour through a variety of social and practical supports. These include case management that links families with services, education on child development and parenting practices, and social support through relationships with service staff and other parents” (para. 6).
 
“With the increased recognition that parenting is influenced by a range of factors that might compromise its functioning, several programs have extended their focus by offering support for parents’ self-care (e.g., depression, birth-control planning), marital quality, and/or economic self-sufficiency (e.g., improving educational, occupational, and housing resources). Ultimately, these programs aim to give parents the knowledge and skills they need to carry out child-rearing responsibilities effectively and provide their children with experiences and opportunities that promote child learning and development” (para. 7).

 

Outdoor environments for children with Autism and Special Needs

Sachs, N., & Vincenta, T. (2011). Outdoor environments for children with Autism and Special Needs. Implications 9(12). Retrieved from http://www.informedesign.org/_news/april_v09-p.pdf

“Knowledge and a comprehensive understanding of the challenges shared by these children push designers toward a more holistic view of outdoor spaces for all children. Nature-based learning and play spaces can become more universal and inclusive by addressing a variety of issues including sensory, cognitive, visual and auditory impairment, and limited fine and gross motor skills” (p. 2).
 

Everyone is welcome: Inclusive early childhood education and care

Underwood, K. (2013). Everyone is welcome: Inclusive early childhood education and care. in Ontario Ministry of Education (2013) Think, Feel Act: Lessons from research about young children. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario website http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/ResearchBriefs.pdf

“Supporting all children to fully participate in their communities requires high quality Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) experiences. High quality inclusive ECEC programs have three key components: they are accessible to all children and their families; they are designed and carried out with consideration for the unique needs of each child; and they include ongoing evaluation of programs to ensure full participation” (p. 31).

 

Vertical living kids

Healthy Parks, Healthy People Central. (2016). Vertical living kidsRetrieved from http://www.hphpcentral.com/article/vertical-living-kids

This article identifies the significant challenges in terms of child development for those living in vertical living. “Vertical Living Kids is a research project that was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, to determine how children living in high rise housing explore the space around their homes, and to recommend better approaches to child-friendly environments for high rise developments” (para. 1). Healthy Parks, Healthy People Central also provides recommendations for state and local government to improve life for children in these dwellings.

 

Significant issues in and around high-rise environments

Arslan, G,. & Sev. A. (2014). Significant issues in and around high-rise environments. International Environment and Design Congress.  Retrieved from http://www.academia.edu/11057600/SIGNIFICANT_ISSUES_IN_AND_AROUND_HIGH-RISE_ENVIRONMENTS

This article will provide “a brief history of high-rise residential buildings and user perceptions of high-rise living will be provided, then the potential environmental, social and psychological impacts of high-rise residential living on the occupants of a wide variety of groups, such as families, elderly people and children, will be considered. Finally, a number of recommendations on how to design satisfying high-rise residential developments with minimal impact will be put forward” (p. 1)

 

Can tall buildings be child-friendly? The vertical living kids research project

Whitzman, C. (2010). Can tall buildings be child-friendly? The vertical living kids research project. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat Journal, IV. 18-23. Retrieved from http://global.ctbuh.org/resources/papers/download/295-can-tall-buildings-be-child-friendly-the-vertical-living-kids-research-project.pdf

“This research project had two objectives: to explore the built and social environmental determinants of children’s independent mobility (CIM) in central Melbourne’s high-rise housing, and to uncover international best practice in planning policy for these communities” (p. 18).

 

The consequences of living in high-rise buildings

Gifford, R. (2007). The consequences of living in high-rise buildingsArchitectural Science Review  50(1). 2-17. Retrieved from http://web.uvic.ca/~esplab/sites/default/files/ASR%20High%20Rises%20proof.pdf

“This literature suggests that high-rises are less satisfactory than other housing forms for most people, that they are not optimal for children, that social relations are more impersonal and helping behavior is less than in other housing forms, that crime and fear of crime are greater, and that they may independently account for some suicides” (p. 2). 

 

An introduction to the state of poverty in Canada

Lamman, C., & MacIntyre, H. (2016). An introduction to the state of poverty in Canada. Retrieved from Fraser Institute website: https://www.fraserinstitute.org/sites/default/files/an-introduction-to-the-state-of-poverty-in-canada.pdf

“This paper serves as a starting point for a broader research agenda that will investigate the root causes of persistent poverty among . . . at-risk groups with the ultimate goal of providing workable options to assist them” (p. ii). 

 

Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2014

Statistics Canada. (2016). Family violence in Canada: A statistical profile, 2014. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/160121/dq160121b-eng.htm

“Results from the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization show that of the 19.2 million Canadians in the provinces who had a current or former spouse or common law partner, about 4% (760,000 individuals) reported having been physically and/or sexually abused by their partner during the preceding five years” (para. 1). 

 

Poverty linked to childhood depression, changes in brain connectivity

Dryden, J. (2016). Poverty linked to childhood depression, changes in brain connectivityRetrieved from https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/poverty-linked-to-childhood-depression-changes-in-brain-connectivity/

 “Analyzing brain scans of 105 children ages 7 to 12, the researchers found that key structures in the brain are connected differently in poor children than in kids raised in more affluent settings. In particular, the brain’s hippocampus — a structure key to learning, memory and regulation of stress — and the amygdala — which is linked to stress and emotion — connect to other areas of the brain differently in poor children than in kids whose families had higher incomes” (para. 2).

 

Resources and research

Best Start Resource Centre. (2016). Resources and research. Retrieved from http://en.beststart.org/resources-and-research 

"The Best Start Resource Centre produces multi-media resources on a broad range of topics related to preconception health, prenatal health and early child development, developed in collaboration with, or with support from other organizations and experts. Materials range from fact sheets, brochures, manuals, posters, displays and videos to program planning guides and reports" (para. 1). 

 

Modern motherhood: The unique experiences of physically disabled women [Web log comment]

Tarasoff, L. (2016). Modern motherhood: The unique experiences of physically disabled women [Web log comment]Retrieved from http://vanierinstitute.ca/modern-motherhood-unique-experiences-physically-disabled-women/?utm_source=Vanier Institute of the Family / Institut Vanier de la famille&utm_campaign=060421fd91-January 2016 news_2016-01-08&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3cb3a8ce

“As part of a long-term project, a diverse group of women with physical or mobility-limiting disabilities in the Greater Toronto Area have been interviewed about their experiences during the perinatal period – pregnancy, labour, birth and early motherhood. Drawing on other research studies and preliminary findings from this project, this article looks at some of the unique experiences of physically disabled women during the perinatal period” (para. 2).

 

Parenting in America: Outlook, worries, aspirations, are strongly linked to financial situation

Pew Research Centre. (2015). Parenting in America: Outlook, worries, aspirations, are strongly linked to financial situation. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2015/12/2015-12-17_parenting-in-america_FINAL.pdf

“A broad, demographically based look at the landscape of American families reveals stark parenting divides linked less to philosophies or values and more to economic circumstances and changing family structure” (p. 4).

 

The economic policy institute's 2015 family budget calculator

Gould, E., Cooke, T., Davis, A., & Kimball, W. (2015). The economic policy institute's 2015 family budget calculator. Retrieved from Economic Policy Institute website: http://www.epi.org/files/2015/2015-family-budget-appendix-final.pdf

“This paper presents the methodology and data sources used in the 2015 update of the Economic Policy Institute’s Family Budget Calculator” (p. 2).

“The size of a family dramatically affects the budget needed to maintain a secure yet modest standard of living. We have constructed budgets for 10 different types of families in [618 areas of the United States]” (p. 1)

 

Canadian megatrends, December 2015: The surge of women in the workforce

Statistics Canada. (2015). Canadian megatrends, December 2015: The surge of women in the workforce. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/151217/dq151217d-eng.htm

“This issue of Canadian Megatrends examines the movement of women into the workplace and its effect on the composition of Canada's labour market” (para. 2).

 

First Nations health and well-being

Provincial Health Officer of BC and the First Nations Health Authority. (2015). First Nations health and well-being. Retrieved from http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/health/about-bc-s-health-care-system/office-of-the-provincial-health-officer/reports-publications/special-reports/first-nations-health-and-well-being-interim-update-nov-2015.pdf

“Overall, this report shows that there have been meaningful improvements in the health and wellbeing of First Nations peoples in BC and progress toward [health targets set out in the 2005 Transformative Change Accord: First Nations Health Plan]. The final interim update will be released in 2017 to report on data up to 2015” (p. 1).

 

Closing the gender wage gap

Ontario Ministry of Labour. (2015). Closing the gender wage gap. Retrieved from http://www.labour.gov.on.ca/english/about/gwg/consultation.php

"The Gender Wage Gap Strategy Steering Committee is consulting Ontarians on how to close the wage gap between men and women" (para. 1). Access background papers, consultation papers for organizations and individuals, an online survey, and the dates of upcoming town hall meetings through this web page.

 

Parenting skills: Animal models of maternal behaviour: Insights into our understanding the endocrinology, neurobiology, genetics and development of mothering

Akbari, E., Wonch, K., & Fleming, A. S. (2015). Parenting skills: Animal models of maternal behaviour: Insights into our understanding the endocrinology, neurobiology, genetics and development of mothering.  In Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development. Retrieved from http://www.child-encyclopedia.com/parenting-skills/according-experts/animal-models-maternal-behaviour-insights-our-understanding

This article is introduced with a summary of the physiological change that new mothers experience and the influence of caregiving upon children’s development. The article continues with an overview of research regarding maternal behaviour (including key questions, recent results, and gaps) for the purpose of informing services and policies that support parents.

 

Provincial government launches Early Learning and Child Care Directory

Executive Council, Education and Early Childhood Development. (2015, September 2). Provincial government launches Early Learning and Child Care Directory. Retrieved from http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2015/exec/0902n04.aspx

“Families with young children now have the opportunity to easily access information on regulated child care services and family resource centres located throughout Newfoundland and Labrador using an online interactive database. The new Early Learning and Child Care Directory was launched today and can be viewed at childcare.gov.nl.ca.” (para. 1).

 

Can we finish the revolution? Gender, work-family ideals, and institutional constraint

Pedulla, S., & Thébaud, S. (2014). Can we finish the revolution? Gender, work-family ideals, and institutional constraint. Retrieved from Population Association of America 2014 Annual Meeting Program website: http://paa2014.princeton.edu/papers/140240

“In this article, we build on and extend prior research by examining the extent to which institutional constraints, including workplace policies, affect young, unmarried men’s and

women’s preferences for their future work-family arrangements. . . . Drawing on original survey-experimental data, we ask respondents how they would like to structure their future relationships while experimentally manipulating the degree of institutional constraint under which they state their preferences” (p. 2).

 

Income research paper series: Low income lines, 2013-2014

Statistics Canada. (2015). Income research paper series: Low income lines, 2013-2014. Retrieved from Government of Canada website http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75f0002m/75f0002m2015001-eng.pdf

“The purpose of this document is to provide the dollar cut-offs used to define the low income population. Low income status can be determined using family or household income” (p. 5). 

 

Changes in debt and assets of Canadian families, 1999 to 2012

Uppal, S. (2015). Changes in debt and assets of Canadian families, 1999 to 2012. Retrieved from Statistics Canada website: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2015001/article/14167-eng.htm

“This paper examines changes in debt, assets and net worth among Canadian families with debt over the period 1999 to 2012, by selected family characteristics. It also examines the extent to which two key ratios of indebtedness, the debt-to-income ratio and the debt-to-asset ratio, varied over the period” (para. 1). 

 

Insights on Canadian society: Employment patterns of families with children

Uppal, S. (2015). Insights on Canadian society: Employment patterns of families with children. Retrieved from Statistics Canada website: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2015001/article/14202-eng.pdf

“This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents” (p. 1). 

 

The impact of New Brunswick’s 2009-2014 economic and social inclusion plan

Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation. (2015). The impact of New Brunswick’s 2009-2014 economic and social inclusion plan. Retrieved from http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/ImpactOfNBEconomicAndSocialInclusionPlan.pdf

This report evaluates the impact of Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan 1 2009-2014.

Mums the world! Cross-national effects of maternal employment on gender inequalities at work and at home

Castro, M., Lingo, E., & McGinn, K. (2015). Mums the world! Cross-national effects of maternal employment on gender inequalities at work and at home (Working paper 15-094). Retrieved from Harvard Business School website: http://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Publication%20Files/15-094_ec1280d1-6f9a-4fd1-bbe5-0d98d87ee41b.pdf

“Our research considers how inequalities in public and the private spheres are affected by childhood exposure to non-traditional gender role models at home” (p. 1). 

 

The influence of childcare arrangements on child well being from infancy to middle childhood

Byrne, D., & O’Toole, C. (2015). The influence of childcare arrangements on child well being from infancy to middle childhood. Retrieved from Maynooth University websitehttps://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/sites/default/files/assets/document/Byrne%20and%20O%27Toole_0.pdf

“The study set out to describe the uptake of non-parental care from infancy to middle childhood, and to determine how such uptake in­fluences the wellbeing of children” (p. 6). 

 

Promoting mental health: Finding a shared language

Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Health Promotion Research Centre. (2015). Promoting mental health: Finding a shared language. [Video clip]. Retrieved from https://vimeo.com/130580621

“There is growing discussion about mental health in Ontario and the way we talk about it matters. This brand new video by the CAMH Health Promotion Resource Centre explains the separate but interconnected concepts of mental health and mental illness, as well as what it means to ‘promote mental health’, in ourselves and in our communities” (para. 2). 

 

Insights on Canadian society: Employment patterns of families with children

Uppal, S. (2015). Insights on Canadian society: Employment patterns of families with children (Catalogue No. 75-006-X). Retrieved from Statistics Canada website: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2015001/article/14202-eng.pdf

“This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents” (p. 1). 

 

How the Child and Adult Care Food Program improves early childhood education

Binder, C., Berg, J., Adamu, M., & Hamm, K. (2015). How the Child and Adult Care Food Program improves early childhood education. Retrieved from the Center for American Progress website: https://cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/CACFP-report-6.10.pdf

“This report makes a case for why Congress should include provisions in the CNR [child nutrition reauthorization] bill to reduce participation barriers for programs and providers and maximize the [Child and Adult Care Food Program’s] potential” (p. 1). 

 

Growing up in B.C. - 2015

The Representative for Children and Youth & the Provincial Health Officer. (2015). Growing up in B.C. - 2015. Retrieved from https://www.rcybc.ca/sites/default/files/documents/pdf/reports_publications/guibc-2015-finalforweb_0.pdf

“This report looks at the well-being of all children and youth in B.C. and also updates information about two groups of children and youth who have experienced less wellbeing historically: those with experience in government care, and Aboriginal children and youth” (p. 2). 

 

National household survey (NHS)

Statistics Canada. (2015). National household survey (NHS) Retrieved from http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/index-eng.cfm

Reference material explaining the National Household Survey (NHS), as well as data collected through the survey in 2011 and analyses of the data, can be accessed through this  Statistics Canada website. 

 

Building young brains - tweet chat Dec. 10, 2014

Link, S. (2015). Building young brains - tweet chat Dec. 10, 2014. Retrieved from https://storify.com/SylviaLink/building-young-brains-tweet-chat-dec-10-2014?utm_medium=sfy.co-twitter&awesm=sfy.co_e03b1&utm_campaign=&utm_source=direct-sfy.co&utm_content=storify-pingback

“Jim Grieve and Jean Clinton hosted a tweet chat on Dec. 10, 2014. The topic was building young brains” (para. 1).

 

Counting on quality: Measuring and improving quality in early childhood environments

International Step by Step Association. (2015). Counting on quality: Measuring and improving quality in early childhood environments. Retrieved from Bernard van Leer Foundation website: http://www.bernardvanleer.org/Counting-on-Quality-Measuring-and-Improving-Quality-in-Early-Childhood-Environments

“Reflecting the broad support for attention to quality, ISSA [International Step by Step Association], UNICEF [The United Nations Children's Fund], UNESCO [The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization] and the Bernard van Leer Foundation, in partnership with the World Bank and the Brookings Institution, joined forces to call attention to the importance of measuring and improving quality in early childhood environments” (p. 1). Counting on Quality: Measuring and Improving Quality in Early Childhood Environments is a report from the international consultation that was convened in Leiden, the Netherlands in September 2014.  

 

Study: Grandparents living with their grandchildren, 2011

Government of Canada. (2015). Study: Grandparents living with their grandchildren, 2011. Retrieved from Statistics Canada website: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150414/dq150414a-eng.htm

“In this study, data from the National Household Survey (NHS) were used to identify the number of grandparents living with grandchildren based on a population aged 45 and older in private households” (Note to Readers section, para.1). 

 

Economic plan in brief

Government of Quebec. (2015). Economic plan in brief. Retrieved from http://www.budget.finances.gouv.qc.ca/budget/2015-2016/index_en.asp

The government of Quebec has released its 2015-2016 budget. The cited web page provides a summary of the budget and links to related documents.

 

2015-2016 Budget

Government of New Brunswick. (2015). 2015-2016 Budget. Retrieved from http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/en/departments/finance/budget/2015-2016/budget.html

The government of New Brunswick has released its 2015-2016 budget that focuses on three key priorities: creating the conditions for job creation, facing fiscal challenges, and helping families.

 

Resources

BC Council for Families. (2015). Resources. Retrieved from https://www.bccf.ca/bccf/resources/mother-goose-in-the-aboriginal-community/

Our Resource Centre is where you’ll find it all- in a catalogue of continually updated family service sector articles, magazines, podcasts, tip-sheets and videos.

 

Men, fathers, and work-family balance

Rehel, E., & Baxter, E. (2015). Men, fathers, and work-family balanceRetrieved from the Center for American Progress website: https://cdn.americanprogress.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/MenWorkFamily-brief.pdf

“While it is important to address the specific needs of women and mothers as workers, the aim of this issue brief is to outline how work-life issues such as workplace flexibility, paid leave, and pay equity should very much be seen as issues affecting men directly, not just in their roles as partners, fathers, colleagues, and friends of women” (p. 2).

 

Live-in caregivers in Fort McMurray: A socioeconomic footprint

Dorow, S., Cassiano, M., & Doerksen, C. (2015). Live-in caregivers in Fort McMurray:  A socioeconomic footprint. Retrieved from On the Move Partnership website: http://www.onthemovepartnership.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Live-in-Caregivers-in-Fort-McMurray-Dorow-et-al.-January-2015.pdf

 “The report illuminates the importance of paid caregivers to the ability of the local workforce to keep up with the demands of employment and family, and examines caregivers’ work experiences, life plans, and views on Canada’s immigration policies” (p. 2). 

 

School readiness: A conceptual framework

Britto, P.R.(2012). School readiness: A conceptual framework. Retrieved from UNICEF’s website: http://www.unicef.org/education/files/Chil2Child_ConceptualFramework_FINAL%281%29.pdf

“The focus of the current paper is to present a clear and comprehensive model of school readiness built on the latest knowledge, with the aim of ensuring relevance in the majority of the world” (p. 5). 

 

Volunteering and charitable giving in Canada

Turcotte, M. (2015). Volunteering and charitable giving in Canada (Catalogue No. 89-652-X2015001). Retrieved from Statistics Canada website: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/89-652-x/89-652-x2015001-eng.htm

“This report uses data from the 2013 General Social Survey (GSS) on Giving, Volunteering and Participating to profile volunteering and giving in Canada” (para. 4). 

 

Ending child poverty now

Children’s Defense Fund. (2014). Ending child poverty now. Retrieved from http://www.childrensdefense.org/library/PovertyReport/EndingChildPovertyNow.html

This document reports the child poverty rate in the United States of America and its impacts and suggests how to alleviate poverty. “For the first time, this report shows that by investing an additional 2 percent of the federal  budget into existing programs and policies that increase employment, make work pay, and ensure children’s basic needs are met, the nation could reduce child poverty by 60 percent and lift 6.6 million children out of poverty (Overview section,  para. 1). 

 

Shared parental leave: Public attitudes

Opinion Matters. (2015). Shared parental leave: Public attitudes. Retrieved from UK Government website: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_ data/file/394623/bis-15-32-shared-parenting-leave-public-attitudes.pdf

“Opinion Matters were commissioned by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills to carry out research into attitudes to shared parenting. 2,138 adults from across the UK were surveyed between 04 and 11 December 2014 to examine attitudes towards Shared Parenting and assess potential uptake of Shared Parental Leave entitlement” (p. 2).

 

Parental employment benefits around the world

Citation Ltd. (2014). Parental employment benefits around the world. Retrieved from http://www.citation.co.uk/news/parental-employment-benefits-around-the-world

The infographic compares the United Kingdom to nations around the world regarding parental equality.

 

Preventing violence: Canadian best practices portal

Government of Canada. (n.d.). Preventing violence: Canadian best practices portalRetrieved from Public Health Agency of Canada website: http://cbpp-pcpe.phac-aspc.gc.ca/category/behaviour-related-risk/preventing-violence/ 

The Canadian Best Practices Portal provides health professionals and the general public with links to resources and solutions for planning programs to promote health and prevent disease. The portal features a specific category page that provides links to programs and initiatives aiming to prevent violence and reduce the long-term effects associated with violence.  

 

The wealth gap: Perceptions and misconceptions in Canada

Broadbent Institute. (2014). The wealth gap: Perceptions and misconceptions in Canada. Retrieved from http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/sites/default/files/documents/wealthgap-en-final.pdf 

"In a new nationwide survey among 3,000 Canadians conducted by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Canada for the Broadbent Institute, Canadians were asked about their perceptions of inequality and the distribution  of wealth in Canada. The findings demonstrate that Canadians vastly underestimate how skewed the distribution of wealth actually is and think there should be a much more equitable distribution. Meanwhile, a large majority of Canadians believe income inequality has worsened in the last decade, and believe the government can — and should — do something to reduce the gap between rich and poor" (p. 1). 

 

The delivery of prenatal education in Ontario: A summary of research findings

The Best Start Resource Centre. (2014) The delivery of prenatal education in Ontario: A summary of research findings. Retrieved from http://www.beststart.org/resources/rep_health/BSRC_Prenatal_Summary_fnl.pdf 

"The Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care provided funding to the Best Start Resource Centre to develop key messages and tools to assist service providers in Ontario in delivering consistent and evidence-based prenatal education.... In order to develop prenatal education key messages and tools, information was gathered from multiple sources to establish the current situation for prenatal education in Ontario and determine gaps and needs related to prenatal education in Ontario. Some highlights include: the characteristics and needs of prenatal education providers; preferred methods of receiving prenatal information, and the types of prenatal education programs in Ontario" (p. 2). 

 

One step at a time: The effects of an early literacy text messaging program for parents of preschoolers

York, B. N., & Loeb, S. (2014, November). One step at a time: The effects of an early literacy text messaging program for parents of preschoolers (working paper). The National Bureau of Economic Research. Retrieved from http://www.nber.org/papers/w20659#fromrss

"Substantial systematic differences exist in children’s home learning experiences. The few existing parenting programs that have shown promise often are not widely accessible, either due to the demands they place on parents’ time and effort or cost. In this study, we evaluate the effects of READY4K!, a text messaging program for parents of preschoolers designed to help them support their children’s literacy development."

 

Families at the Centre: What do low income families say about care and education for their young children?

UNSW Australia. (2014, November). Families at the Centre: What do low income families say about care and education for their young children?  Sydney: Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW Australia. Retrieved from https://www.sprc.unsw.edu.au/media/SPRCFile/2014_Families_at_the_Centre__What_do_low_income_families_say.pdf

"Early childhood education and care (ECEC) is a major focus of public policy, public debate and social expenditure in Australia and internationally. The benefits o participation in high quality ECEC are especially strong for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. Despite a surge of interest in early childhood education, there is little information about how early childhood services operate at the local level, how parents make decisions about the use of ECEC services, how they negotiate local markets and how they understand the subsidies and rules that govern access to ECEC" (pg. 3).

 

Creating opportunity for families: A two-generation approach

Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2014, November 12). Creating opportunity for families: A two-generation approach. Annie E. Casey Foundation. Retrieved from http://www.aecf.org/resources/creating-opportunity-for-families/

"Nearly half of the nation’s families with young children struggle to make ends meet. This report describes a new approach to reducing poverty, which calls for connecting low-income families with early childhood education, job training and other tools to achieve financial stability and break the cycle of poverty — and recommends ways to help equip parents and children with what they need to thrive" (para. 1).

 

Careless about childcare

Marin, Andre. (2014, October). Careless about childcareOmbudsman Ontario. Retrieved from https://ombudsman.on.ca/Files/sitemedia/Documents/CarelessAboutChildCareEN_1.pdf

"Every weekday, hundreds of thousands of working parents in Ontario entrust their children to the care of others. Unfortunately, some children are placed at unnecessary risk in unlicensed and illegally operated child care centres, often hidden behind the closed doors and shuttered windows of private homes" (pg. 8).

 

National family week resources

FRP Canada. (2014, September). National family week resourcesFRP Canada. Retrieved from http://frp.ca/

"Financial literacy is not just about money, it’s an essential life skill. For families, it’s an opportunity to learn together about setting goals, planning ahead, and making choices about needs versus wants. Financial literacy empowers families to make the best decisions for their financial well-being" (para. 1).

 

Labour & employment news summer 2014 newsletter

Borden Ladner Gervais. (Summer 2014). Labour & employment news summer 2014 newsletter. Borden Ladner Gervais. Retrieved from http://www.blg.com/en/NewsAndPublications

"This edition features articles on damages under human rights legislation, the application of the reasonable notice doctrine across the border, and workplace stress claims under workplace safety and insurance legislation. In addition, it outlines new leaves of absence coming into effect in Ontario this fall under employment standards legislation, [which includes new family caregiver leave policies]. And finally, a recent case on employee rights on a sale of business in Quebec is outlined" (para. 1).

 

Child well-being in rich countries: A comparative overview

UNICEF. (2014). Child well-being in rich countries: A comparative overview. UNICEF. Retrieved from http://www.unicef.ca/sites/default/files

This report includes three parts: "Part One presents a league table of child well-being in 29 of the world's advanced economies. Part Two looks at what children say about their own well-being (including a league table of children's life satisfaction). Part Three examines changes in child well-being in advanced economies over the first decade of the 2000s" (p. 3). 

 

Child discipline: Ontario parents' knowledge, beliefs, and behaviours

Best Start Resource Centre. (2014). Child discipline: Ontario parents' knowledge, beliefs, and behaviours. Retrieved from http://beststart.org/resources/hlthy_chld_dev/BSRC_Child_Discipline_Report.pdf

"This report presents data from the Best Start Resource Centre’s 2013 survey on child discipline. The survey was directed to parents or main caregivers of children aged 6 years or younger living in Ontario, examining their knowledge, beliefs and behaviours regarding child discipline. . . .
The results described in this report can be used to guide future strategies to support parents in developing healthy, safe and effective child-discipline practices" (p. 6).

 

Research report on LGB-parent families

Goldberg, A. E., Gartrell, N. K., & Gates, G. (2014). Research report on LGB-parent families. Retrieved from the Williams Institute website: http://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/lgb-parent-families-july-2014.pdf

"This report provides an overview of the contemporary LGB-parent family research" (p. 1). Focusing on research subject to scientific peer review, the authors report, " The findings are consistent in suggesting that despite confronting heterosexism in a variety of social contexts -- including the health care system, the legal system, and the school system -- LGB parents and their children are functioning quite well." Future research directions are suggested.

 

From migrant to citizen: Learning from the experiences of former caregivers transitioning out of the live-in caregiver program

Gabriela Ontario, Ryerson University, & York University. (2014). From migrant to citizen: Learning from the experiences of former caregivers transitioning  out of the live-in caregiver program. Retrieved from http://www.gatesurvey.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/GATES-Preliminary-Analysis-201407221.pdf

"The Gabriela Transitions Experiences Survey (GATES) is a community-led national survey of 631 current and former live-in caregivers in Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Ottawa and Montreal, with financial support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. GATES was initiated in 2011 by former live-in caregivers in Gabriela Ontario to gather information about the experiences of the Filipina women who are transitioning to life as Canadians after completing their Live-In Caregiver Program requirements. . . . There is the expectation among policymakers and live-in caregivers that live-in caregivers' lives in Canada improve upon the acquisition of Canadian permanent residency and Canadian citizenship. However, we know from previous studies that newcomers to Canada face barriers to their integration, such as the devaluation of foreign education and work experience as well as issues of family separation. GATES is the first large-scale study in Canada to systematically investigate the barriers impeding live-in caregivers' settlement in Canada" (pp 2-3).

 

Social determinants of children's health in Canada: Analysis and implications

Raphael, D. (2014). Social determinants of children's health in Canada: Analysis and implications. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 5(2): 220–239. Retrieved from http://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/ijcyfs/article/view/12899/3988

"The health of Canada’s children when placed in comparative perspective with other wealthy developed nations is mediocre at best. Much of this has to do with the social determinants of children’s health (SDCH) in Canada being of generally lower quality and more inequitably distributed than is the case in most other wealthy developed nations" (p. 220).

 

Gaps in early childhood, school readiness, & school achievement: Policy responses

Waldfogel, J. (2014, January 27). Gaps in early childhood, school readiness, & school achievement: Policy responses [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/blogs/social-mobility-memos/posts/2014/01/27-gaps-in-early-childhood-school-readiness-achievement

This blog entry shares evidence that parenting programs, preschool, and such social programs as food/nutrition programs can reduce achievement gaps between children of different socioeconomic statuses at school entry.

 

Investigating welfare reform in Scotland: Report summary, key findings and recommendations

The Institute for Research and Innovation in Social Services, & The Coalition of Care and Support Providers in Scotland (2014, June 5). Investigating welfare reform in Scotland: Report summary, key findings and recommendations [web log comment]. Retrieved from http://blogs.iriss.org.uk/welfarereformscotland/2014/05/06/report-summary-key-findings-and-recommendations/

Through a literature review and interviews with organizations in the care and support sector, the authors investigate how welfare reform in Scotland is affecting the social service workforce.

 

Growing number of dads home with the kids

Livingston, G. (2014, June 5). Growing number of dads home with the kids. Pew Research Social & Demographic Trends. Retrieved from http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2014/06/05/growing-number-of-dads-home-with-the-kids/

This resource examines the growing trend of "stay-at-home" fathers. "Chapter 1 highlights trends in the likelihood of being a stay-at-home father among those dads who live with their children. It also illustrates how the likelihood of being a stay-at-home father varies for different demographic groups. Chapter 2 highlights the changing reasons that fathers give for staying at home, and Chapter 3 provides profiles of both stay-at-home fathers and their working counterparts" (para. 10).

 

Immigrant parents and early childhood programs: Addressing barriers of literacy, culture, and systems knowledge

Park, M. & McHugh, M. (2014). Immigrant parents and early childhood programs: Addressing barriers of literacy, culture, and systems knowledge. Retrieved from Migration Policy Institute website: http://www.migrationpolicy.org/research/immigrant-parents-early-childhood-programs-barriers

"[T]his report identifies the unique needs of newcomer parents across the range of expectations for parent skill, engagement, and leadership sought by ECEC programs, and strategies undertaken to address these needs. The study is based on field research in six states, expert interviews, a literature review, and a sociodemographic analysis" (para. 4).

 

Living arrangements of children in Canada: A century of change

Bohnert, N., Milan, A., & Lathe, H. (2014). Living arrangements of children in Canada: A century of change. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/75-006-x/2014001/article/11919-eng.pdf.  

"In this article, the family structure and living arrangements of  Canadian  children  are  examined  over  consecutive generations,  based  on  census  data  for  the  period from  1901  to  2011. The census provides both an extensive time series and a unique lens to examine the circumstances of children in Canada over time. Four eras reflecting major shifts in living arrangements are considered: the early 20th century, the baby boom (mid-20th century), the late 20th century, and the early 21st century. The results  show  that  every  period  has  its  own  distinct characteristics—yet,  results  also indicate  that  some issues  frequently  considered  modern  phenomena have actually been present over many decades" (pg. 1).

 

Social determinants of children's health in Canada: Analysis and implications

Raphael, D. (2014). Social determinants of children's health in Canada: Analysis and implications. International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies, 5(2), 220-239. Retrieved from http://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/ijcyfs/article/view/12899/3988.

This article addresses the poor health of Canada's children when compared to other wealthy developed nations. The social determinants of children's health in Canada (SDCH) are lower quality and more inequitably distributed in comparison to other wealthier nations.  Canada's support of SDCH through health promoting public policy is lacking. This article addresses ways of improving this situation through both advocacy and political action.

 

How are our children doing?: Community profiles of early childhood development in Alberta

Early Childhood Development Mapping Project. (2014). How are our children doing?: Community profiles of early childhood development in Alberta. Edmonton, AB: ECMap, Community-University Partnership for the Study of Children, Youth
and Families, University of Alberta. Retrieved from http://ecmaps.ca/assetReports/Introduction.pdf

"An overview of EDI [Early Development Instrument], socio-economic and community resource data is provided for Alberta. More in-depth information for the province can be found in a companion report, How are our young children doing? A provincial analysis of early childhood development in Alberta" (p. I-9).

 

Achieving excellence: A renewed vision for education in Ontario

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2014). Achieving excellence: A renewed vision for education in Ontario. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/about/renewedVision.pdf

This report outlines four key goals for Ontario's education system that were developed based upon discussions involving individuals and organizations within and outside of the education sector.

 

How are Ontarians really doing? A provincial report on Ontario wellbeing

Canadian Index of Wellbeing. (2014). How are Ontarians really doing? A provincial report on Ontario
wellbeing
. Waterloo, ON: Canadian Index of Wellbeing and University of Waterloo. Retrieved from https://uwaterloo.ca/canadian-index-wellbeing/sites/ca.canadian-index-wellbeing/files/uploads/files/ontarioreport-accessible_0.pdf

Using data from the Canadian Index of Wellbeing's 2012 national report, this report describes changes in Ontarians' quality of life between 1994 and 2010 and compares these changes to changes in quality of life experienced by other Canadians. "The CIW measures overall wellbeing based on 64 indicators covering eight domains of vital importance to Canadians: Education, Community Vitality, Healthy Populations, Democratic Engagement, Environment, Leisure and Culture, Time Use, and Living Standards" (p. 1).

 

Study: Living arrangements of children in Canada, 1901 to 2011

Statistics Canada. (2014). Study: Living arrangements of children in Canada, 1901 to 2011. Retrieved from
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/140429/dq140429c-eng.htm

"In this release, data from the 1901 to 2011 censuses of population are used to examine the trends in living arrangements of children, who are defined as individuals aged 24 and under living as children in census families in private households" (p. 1).

 

Best evidence for the detection, prevention and treatment of perinatal depression

Dennis, C-L. (2014, February). Best evidence for the detection, prevention and treatment of perinatal depression. Presented at Best Start Resource Centre 2014 Annual Conference, Toronto, Canada. Retrieved from http://www.beststart.org/events/2014/bsannualconf14/webcov/Presentations_ForParticipants/New/C3_PPD-BestStart%20February%202014.pdf

These presentation slides review what perinatal depression is and present research regarding the consequences, prevalence, risk factors, treatment, management, and prevention of perinatal and postpartum depression.

 

Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2013). Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/ResearchBriefs.pdf

Six research briefs highlight recent research, suggest how to implement the research in practice, and pose reflective questions. Topics include the power of positive adult-child relationships, the environment as teacher, pedagogical leadership, self-regulation, and pedagogical documentation, and inclusive education and care.

 

Inclusion Research

Starting school with special needs: Issues for families with complex support needs as their children start school

Dockett, S., Perry, B., & Kearney, E. (2011). Starting school with special needs: Issues for families with complex support needs as their children start schoolExceptionality Education International (21)2. 45-61. Retrieved from http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1047&context=eei
 
“This paper recognizes family–school connections as dynamic and influenced by a range of social and cultural contexts (McTaggart & Sanders, 2003). It considers the ways in which families described as having complex support needs, as well as the care of a child with special needs, draw upon their own resources, experiences, and circumstances to support their children during the transition to school” (p. 45).

 

Promoting positive education and care transitions for children

Rosier, K., & McDonald, M. (2011). Promoting positive education and care transitions for children. Retrieved from Australian Government of Family Studies’ website  https://aifs.gov.au/cfca/publications/promoting-positive-education-and-care-transitions-children

“This Resource Sheet is a review of research regarding children’s transition from home, to early childhood education and care services and then to school, with a specific focus upon both children and parents’ experiences of those transitions. The factors that influence a child’s ability to adapt to school are considered and case studies of promising transition programs are provided” (para. 1).

 

May month

Canadian Academy of Audiology. (2016). May month. Retrieved from https://canadianaudiology.ca/for-the-public/may-month/

“The Canadian Academy of Audiology (CAA) is helping audiologists all over Canada to promote hearing healthcare by sharing projects submitted by the next generation of audiologists from University of British Columbia, Western University and Dalhousie University” (para. 2).

 

The family gathering: A survival guide. How to help your kids be at their best and have fun, too

Ehmke, R. (2015). The family gathering: A survival guide. How to help your kids be at their best and have fun, too. Retrieved from http://www.childmind.org/en/posts/articles/2012-11-13-holiday-family-gatherings-survival-guide

 “[Child Mind Institute has] compiled a list of seasonal tips to help all kids—and parents—enjoy the party” (para. 3).

 

A good start: advances in early childhood development [Special issue]

Lombardi, J. (2015). A good start: advances in early childhood development [Special issue]. Early Childhood Matters, 124, 1-106.Retrieved from http://www.bernardvanleer.org/A-good-start-advances-in-early-childhood-development

Home visiting, parent support, fatherhood, and children with disabilities are among the subjects of articles in this journal that surveys current knowledge and future priorities in early childhood.

 

Children with autism spectrum disorder are skilled at reading emotion body language

Brownell, C., Peterson, C., & Slaughter, V. (2015). Children with autism spectrum disorder are skilled at reading emotion body language [Abstract]. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 139, 35-50. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2015.04.012

A study showing how children with ASD, commonly believed to impair the ability to perceive emotions, are as skilled at recognizing people’s body language.

This study examined how children with autism and their typically developing peers use body posture and eyes to read emotions. The study also examined how verbal IQ and theory of mind are related to children’s perceptions of emotions. 

Only the abstract of this article is available free of charge. Ryerson students can access the entire article through the Ryerson Library.

 

Intervention in 6-month-olds with autism ameliorates symptoms, alleviates developmental delay

University of California Davis Health System. (2014). Intervention in 6-month-olds with autism ameliorates symptoms, alleviates developmental delay. Retrieved from http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/publish/news/research/9182

"Treatment at the earliest age when signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appear – sometimes in infants as young as 6 months old – significantly reduces symptoms so that, by age 3, most who received the therapy had neither ASD nor developmental delay, a UC Davis MIND Institute research study has found" (para. 1).

This resource includes a video of an interview with Sally Rogers discussing her research, a description of the research, and a download depicting early signs of autism in infants.

 

National household survey (NHS)

Statistics Canada. (2015). National household survey (NHS) Retrieved from http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/index-eng.cfm

Reference material explaining the National Household Survey (NHS), as well as data collected through the survey in 2011 and analyses of the data, can be accessed through this  Statistics Canada website. 

 

Achievement gaps on state tests remain wide for students with disabilities

Samuels, C. (2015, June 1). Achievement gaps on state tests remain wide for students with disabilities. Education Week. Retrieved from http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/speced/2015/06/achievement_gaps_on_state_test.html

 “In 2012-13, students with disabilities scored from 32 to 41 percentage points lower than their peers on state tests, according to the "2012-13 Publicly Reported Assessment Results for Students with Disabilities and ELLs with Disabilities, released in May”  (para. 1).

 

2012-13 publicly reported assessment results for students with disabilities and ELLs with disabilities (Technical Report 70)

Albus, D., Lazarus, S. S., & Thurlow, M. L. (2015). 2012-13 publicly reported assessment results for students with disabilities and ELLs with disabilities (Technical Report 70). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved from http://www.cehd.umn.edu/nceo/OnlinePubs/Tech70/TechnicalReport70.pdf

“The purpose of this report is to analyze the extent to which states report data for students with disabilities ‘to the public with the same frequency and in the same detail as it reports on the assessment of nondisabled children,’ as required by IDEA (Wiley, Thurlow, & Klein, 2005)” (p.1).

 

Canadian survey on disability, 2012

Statistics Canada. (2015). Canadian survey on disability, 2012. Retrieved from Government of Canada website: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/150522/dq150522f-eng.htm

 “Data from the 2012 Canadian Survey on Disability on the income characteristics of Canadians with disabilities are now available in CANSIM” (para. 1). 

 

Webinar summary - Early childhood inclusion: Challenges and strategies from the 2014 Preschool Inclusion Survey

Early Learning Challenge Technical Assistance.  (2015). Webinar summary - Early childhood inclusion: Challenges and strategies from the 2014 Preschool Inclusion Survey. Retrieved from https://elc.grads360.org/services/PDCService.svc/GetPDCDocumentFile?fileId=9652

This document summarizes the challenges and opportunities identified in the 2014 Preschool Inclusion Survey conducted in the United States. 

 

Building young brains - tweet chat Dec. 10, 2014

Link, S. (2015). Building young brains - tweet chat Dec. 10, 2014. Retrieved from https://storify.com/SylviaLink/building-young-brains-tweet-chat-dec-10-2014?utm_medium=sfy.co-twitter&awesm=sfy.co_e03b1&utm_campaign=&utm_source=direct-sfy.co&utm_content=storify-pingback

“Jim Grieve and Jean Clinton hosted a tweet chat on Dec. 10, 2014. The topic was building young brains” (para. 1).

 

Counting on quality: Measuring and improving quality in early childhood environments

International Step by Step Association. (2015). Counting on quality: Measuring and improving quality in early childhood environments. Retrieved from Bernard van Leer Foundation website: http://www.bernardvanleer.org/Counting-on-Quality-Measuring-and-Improving-Quality-in-Early-Childhood-Environments

“Reflecting the broad support for attention to quality, ISSA [International Step by Step Association], UNICEF [The United Nations Children's Fund], UNESCO [The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization] and the Bernard van Leer Foundation, in partnership with the World Bank and the Brookings Institution, joined forces to call attention to the importance of measuring and improving quality in early childhood environments” (p. 1). Counting on Quality: Measuring and Improving Quality in Early Childhood Environments is a report from the international consultation that was convened in Leiden, the Netherlands in September 2014.  

 

The neuroscience of learning: How the brain works to support the growth mindset, resilience & well-being

Flet, G., & Ball, S. (2015). The neuroscience of learning: How the brain works to support the growth mindset, resilience & well-being [PDF document]. Retrieved from Ontario Education Research Symposium website: https://event-wizard.com/OERS2015/0/pages/70780/  

These slides are from a workshop at the Ontario Education Research Symposium and address three learning goals: “

·         Obtain new knowledge about what neuroscience is revealing about our brains from a dynamics, process approach

·         Develop an expanded view of resilience in terms of emotional, academic, and social resilience

·         Discover how advances in neuroscience fit with promoting growth mindsets and resilience as a foundation for well-being” ” (p. 2).

 

Early childhood education and care for Aboriginal children in Canada

Preston, J. (2014, November). Early childhood education and care for Aboriginal children in Canada (a joint initiative of the Childcare Resource and Research Unit, Centre for Work, Families and Well-Being at the University of Guelph, and the Department of Sociology at the University of Manitoba). Toronto: Movingchildcareforward.ca  Retrieved from http://movingchildcareforward.ca/images/policybriefs/MCCF_aboriginal_childcare_canada.pdf

"The brief explicates contextual factors that are important to quality Aboriginal early childhood education: privileging Aboriginal pedagogy; promoting indigenous languages and culture; adequate staffing by qualified Aboriginal educators; empowerment of Aboriginal parents and communities; and in the case of kindergarten services, a full-day timetable. The author argues that strong collaborative efforts are needed by multi-level leaders to ensure that quality Aboriginal early childhood education is actualized throughout Canada" (pg. 1).

 

Background paper: Overview of studies related to persons with disabilities, House of Commons 1981-2012

Collin, C. (2012). Background paper: Overview of studies related to persons with disabilities, House of Commons 1981-2012. (Publication No. 2012-84-E). Retrieved from http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2012-84-e.pdf

This paper provides a summary of the studies and reports of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities and its previous Sub-committees and predecessors.

 

The intersection of disability, achievement, and equity: A system review of special education in the TDSB

Brown, R.S., & Parekh, G. (2013). The intersection of disability, achievement, and equity: A system review of special education in the TDSB (Research Report No. 12-13-12). Retrieved from
http://inclusiveeducationcanada.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/intersection-of-disability-achievement-and-equity.pdf

This report provides an overview of Special Education in the TDSB and analyzes each demographic differences among students in Special Eduction, Special Education trajectories, and the correlation between Special Education and student
suspension. The report concludes by reviewing international literature with regards to the role of teachers, classroom placement and organization, and identification processes in Special Education.

Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2013). Think, feel, act: Lessons from research about young children. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/ResearchBriefs.pdf

Six research briefs highlight recent research, suggest how to implement the research in practice, and pose reflective questions. Topics include the power of positive adult-child relationships, the environment as teacher, pedagogical leadership, self-regulation, and pedagogical documentation, and inclusive education and care.

 

Family Supports Policy

News release: Ontario expanding early years programming for children and families

Government of Ontario. (2017). News release: Ontario expanding early years programming for children and families. Retrieved from https://news.ontario.ca/edu/en/2017/10/ontario-expanding-early-years-programming-for-children-and-families.html?utm_source=ondemand&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=p

"Ontario is making it easier for children and their families to access high quality early years programming and services with the launch of 100 new EarlyON Child and Family Centres across the province" (para. 1).

"EarlyON Child and Family Centres will be open to all families across Ontario, and provide support, advice, personal connections and a network of resources as well as play- and inquiry-based programs for young children. The 100 new EarlyON centres will be created over the next three years" (para. 3).

 

Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres (2018): Business Practices and Funding Guidelines for Service System Managers

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2017). Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres (2018): Business Practices and Funding Guidelines for Service System Managers. Retrieved from http://www.msdsb.net/images/ADMIN/ correspondence/2017/2018_Child_and_Family_Centre_Guidelines.pdf

"Consolidated Municipal Service Managers (CMSM) and District Social Service Administration Boards (DSSABs) are responsible for the local management of Child and Family Centres as part their responsibility for the service system management of childcare and other human services.These guidelines are intended to provide service system managers with an overview of program expectations, the Ministry’s funding methodology, and set out eligible expenditures, and reporting requirements for Child and Family Centres. These guidelines come into effect on January 1, 2018" (p. 1).

EarlyON – Ontario’s Child and Family Centres

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2017). EarlyON – Ontario’s Child and Family CentresRetrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/FamilyPrograms.html

"EarlyON Child and Family Centres provide opportunities for children from birth to 6 years of age to participate in play and inquiry-based programs, and support parents and caregivers in their roles. These centres will offer safe and welcoming environments open to all families across Ontario, with qualified professionals and quality programs. Families and caregivers will be able to find support, advice, make personal connections and access a network of resources.

The Ministry of Education will work with municipalities, school boards, community partners, parents and caregivers throughout this transition to enhance programs and minimize service disruptions for children and families. Additional information about the process can be found in the Public Plan for Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres" (para 4-5).

 

Canada-Ontario Early Learning and Child Care Agreement

Government of Canada. (2017). Canada-Ontario Early Learning and Child Care Agreement. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/early-learning-child-care-agreement/agreements-provinces-territories/ontario.html

"Canada and Ontario agree that the long term vision, principles and objectives for early learning and child care, which are set out in the Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework that is attached as Annex 1, will guide the investment of funds provided under this Agreement" (Vision for Early Learning and Child Care).

 

Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework

Government of Canada. (2017). Multilateral Early Learning and Child Care Framework. Retrieved from https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/programs/early-learning-child-care/reports/2017-multilateral-framework.html

"Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Most Responsible for Early Learning and Child Care agree on the importance of supporting parents, families and communities in their efforts to ensure the best possible future for their children. Ministers also recognize that quality early learning and child care systems play an important role in promoting the social, emotional, physical and cognitive development of young children and can support positive lifelong benefits" (para. 1).

 

Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres: Planning Guidelines for Service System Managers

Ministry of Education. (2016). Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres: Planning Guidelines for Service System Managers. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario

"In alignment with the commitment made in the Ontario Early Years Policy Framework, in February 2016 the Ministry announced its intention to transform Ministry-funded child and family programs into an increasingly integrated, cohesive system of services and supports for children ages 0-6 and their parents and caregivers known as Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres (OEYCFCs). Beginning in 2018, Consolidated Municipal Service Managers (CMSMs) and District Social Service Administration Boards (DSSABs) will be responsible for the local management of OEYCFCs as part of their responsibility for the service system management of child care and other human services.... These guidelines are intended to support CMSMs/DSSABs to effectively plan for and implement OEYCFC programs and services, in partnership with school boards and local service providers" (p. 3).

 

 

Ontario’s Renewed Early Years and Child Care Policy Framework

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2017). Ontario’s Renewed Early Years and Child Care Policy Framework. Toronto, ON: Queen’s Printer for Ontario. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/OntarioEarlyYear.pdf.

"Ontario’s Renewed Early Years and Child Care Policy Framework is our province’s plan to transform Ontario’s early years and child care system. This set of initiatives will provide enhancements to create an integrated continuum of learning for children while supporting Ontario’s world-class early years professionals as it gives more children access to early years and child care programs across the system. This includes increasing access to child and family programs as well as our commitment to help 100,000 more children – from birth to age 4 – access licensed care. Our plan sets the foundation for a more responsive and affordable system, and reflects the change that Ontarians told us they need" (p. 5).

 

Building a better future: A discussion paper for transforming early years and child care in Ontario

Early Years Division, Ministry of Education. (2016). Building a better future: A discussion paper for transforming early years and child care in Ontario. Retrieved from https://www.ontario.ca/page/building-better-future-discussion-paper-transforming-early-years-and-child-care-ontario

"This paper features a set of questions, and your responses will help Ontario create a renewed early years and child care policy framework. This framework will present Ontario's new vision for the early years, based on the feedback it collects through this discussion paper. The framework will describe Ontario’s commitment to ensure children have reasonable access to quality early years experiences. It will also list priorities for moving forward, including a strategic plan for Ontario's child care expansion as we build a more accessible, affordable and responsive high-quality early years system" (p. 3).

 

Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres: A Public Plan

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2016). Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres: A Public Plan. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/plan_oeycfc.pdf

"Our goal is to establish a provincial approach for integrating and transforming child and family programs for parents, caregivers and young children (ages 0-6). All existing child and family programs funded by the Ministry of Education will be combined into one program model, and services will be provided through local Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres (OEYCFCs)" (p. 4).

 

AECEO submission to the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs’ Pre-budget consultation process

Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario. (2017). AECEO submission to the Standing Committee on Finance and Economic Affairs’ Pre-budget consultation process. Retrieved from http://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/aeceo/mailings/240/attachments/original/AECEO_Pre-budget_submission_2017_MASTER_1_.pdf?1487789380
 
“The Association for Early Childhood Educators Ontario (AECEO) is the professional association for Early Childhood Educators (ECEs) in Ontario. We support ECEs in their professional practice and advocate for the recognition and appropriate compensation of the profession. Early Childhood Educators are fundamental to high quality early learning and child care. Our members work throughout Ontario in programs for young children and their families, including regulated child care, full-day kindergarten, family resource programs, and support services for children with disabilities” (para. 1).
 
“The AECEO commends the Government of Ontario for its commitment to improve life for children and families in Ontario and we support the concept of transforming the current patchwork system of early years and child care services that parents and families struggle to navigate. We strongly recommend that funds in the 2017 budget be directed to the Ministry of Education to support systemic solutions that address affordability for parents and low compensation for Early Childhood Educators and early years staff” (para. 2).

 

Family Supports Institute Ontario response to: Building a better future: A discussion paper for transforming the Early Years in Ontario

Family Supports Institute Ontario. (2016). Family Supports Institute Ontario response to: Building a better future: A discussion paper for transforming the Early Years in Ontario. Retrieved from https://gallery.mailchimp.com/5eb2bd80577265408672efeb3/files/FSIO_Response_to_Discussion_Paper.pdf 

"Services have emerged over the past fifty years primarily as women's roles in society have changed and traditional systems of support have declined. To date, family support programs (CCRCs, OEYC, PFLC, BBBFs) have not fit neatly into any policy framework, so we applaud your efforts to define and rationalize such services under the early years and child care policy framework and to make them available to all families" (p. 1). 

"As the Government of Canada moves to complete the proposed multilateral framework agreement on early learning and child care, FSIO urges the Ministry of Education to consider investing a portion of additional funds that may become available to child and family centres" (p. 2). 

 

Budget 2017 and child care funding

CARDUS. (2017). Budget 2017 and child care funding. Retrieved from https://www.cardus.ca/organization/news/311/budget-2017-and-child-care-funding/

"Today’s federal budget earmarks $7 billion for daycare spaces in the government’s 10-year social infrastructure fund. Of that total, “a portion” is expressly for Indigenous daycare" (para. 1). 

"The government is allocating $7 billion to child care over the next ten years starting in 2018-19. Next steps include the creation of a framework. But does that match what parents themselves have said they want or need?"  (para. 2). 

"'When subsidies go to child care spaces or centres, rather than directly to parents, these act as a form of soft coercion,” said Andrea Mrozek, program director for Cardus Family. “Rather than expanding options that increase the good for particular families, the government paints families into a corner by favouring one particular option'" (para. 3).

 

Budget 2017

Government of Canada. (2017). Budget 2017. Retrieved from http://www.budget.gc.ca/2017/home-accueil-en.html 

The Government of Canada’s general website for the Budget 2017 – Building a Strong Middle Class. The website clearly displays the categories that Budget 2017 cover, known as Skills and Innovation, Infrastructure, Tax Fairness, and A Strong Canada.
 
“Budget 2017 provides more help for the middle class, and those working hard to join it. The Government of Canada is making investments that will make good well-paying middle class jobs" (Government of Canada). 

 

Everyone is welcome: Inclusive early childhood education and care

Underwood, K. (2013). Everyone is welcome: Inclusive early childhood education and care. in Ontario Ministry of Education (2013) Think, Feel Act: Lessons from research about young children. Retrieved from the Government of Ontario website http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/ResearchBriefs.pdf

“Supporting all children to fully participate in their communities requires high quality Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) experiences. High quality inclusive ECEC programs have three key components: they are accessible to all children and their families; they are designed and carried out with consideration for the unique needs of each child; and they include ongoing evaluation of programs to ensure full participation” (p. 31).

 

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action

Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015). Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada: Calls to Action. Retrieved from http://www.trc.ca/websites/trcinstitution/File/2015/Findings/Calls_to_Action_English2.pdf
 
“In order to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission makes [the call to action outlined in this document]” (p. 5).

 

Consultation on Early Years and Child Care Strategy

Government of Ontario. (2016). Consultation on Early Years and Child Care Strategy. Retrieved from https://www.ontario.ca/page/consultation-early-years-and-child-care-strategy
 
This resource provides information about the consultations on the Early Years and Child Care Strategy, invites you to share your feedback online by January 15, 2017, or attend an in-person consultation session being held in Toronto, Milton, Peterborough, Kitchener, Ottawa, Kingston, and London and Scarborough.
 

Building a Better Future: A discussion paper for transforming early years and child care in Ontario

Government of Ontario. (2016). Building a Better Future: A discussion paper for transforming early years and child care in Ontario. Retrieved from https://www.ontario.ca/page/building-better-future-discussion-paper-transforming-early-years-and-child-care-ontario
 
Making our early years and  child care system the best it can be is only possible if we listen closely to your advice and feedback.  This discussion paper is a starting point for a conversation with parents, families, educators, caregivers, early years and child care partners and anyone who is interested in the next phase of renewal for early years and child care in Ontario. We want to hear from Ontarians all across the province.  (p. 3)

 

Shared framework for building an early childhood education and care (ECEC) system for all

Child Care Advocacy Association of Canada. (2016). Shared framework for building an early childhood education and care (ECEC) system for allRetrieved from Ontario Coalition for Better Childcare’s website https://d3n8a8pro7vhmx.cloudfront.net/childcareon/pages/1368/attachments/original/1453824228/Shared_framework_for_an_ECEC_system_for_all.pdf?1453824228

“This document is addressed to all levels of governments across Canada. It references a shared vision anchored in an evidence-based framework for federal, provincial and territorial governments to use in the building of equitable early childhood education and care (ECEC) for all” (para. 1).  

 

Early childhood educators call on Wynne government to commit to equal pay and decent work

Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario. (2016). Early childhood educators call on Wynne government to commit to equal pay and decent work. Retrieved from http://www.aeceo.ca/early_childhood_educators_call_on_wynne_government_to_commit_to_equal_pay_and_decent_work
 
“To mark Child Care Worker and Early Childhood Educator Appreciation Day on October 26, a new report and thousands of names on petitions shine a light on the challenges faced by Ontario's early childhood workforce and their growing collective call for decent work” (para. 1). 

 

September 2016 mandate letter: Education

Government of Ontario. (2016). September 2016 mandate letter: Education. Retrieved from https://www.ontario.ca/page/september-2016-mandate-letter-education

Premier of Ontario, Kathleen Wynne’s September 2016 mandate letter to the Minister of Education, Honourable Mitzie Hunter in regards to education.  

 

Can tall buildings be child-friendly? The vertical living kids research project

Whitzman, C. (2010). Can tall buildings be child-friendly? The vertical living kids research project. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat Journal, IV. 18-23. Retrieved from http://global.ctbuh.org/resources/papers/download/295-can-tall-buildings-be-child-friendly-the-vertical-living-kids-research-project.pdf

“This research project had two objectives: to explore the built and social environmental determinants of children’s independent mobility (CIM) in central Melbourne’s high-rise housing, and to uncover international best practice in planning policy for these communities” (p. 18).

 

International Day of Families, 15 May 2016

The United Nations. (2016). International Day of Families, 15 May 2016.  Retrieved from https://www.un.org/development/desa/family/2016/03/21/international-day-of-families-15-may-2016/ 

The United Nation's announcement of the theme of 2016's International Day of Families. "The central goals of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development focus on ending poverty, promoting shared economic prosperity, social development and people’s well-being while  protecting the environment" (para. 1). 

 

Launch of new sustainable development agenda to guide development actions for the next 15 years

The United Nations. (2016). Launch of new sustainable development agenda to guide development actions for the next 15 years. Retrieved from http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/blog/2015/12/launch-of-new-sustainable-development-agenda-to-guide-development-actions-for-the-next-15-years/

"'The 17 Sustainable Development Goals are our shared vision of humanity and a social contract between the world”s leaders and the people,” said UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. “They are a to-do list for people and planet, and a blueprint for success'" (para. 2.). 

 

Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for sustainable development

General Assembly. (2016). Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for sustainable development. Retrieved from http://www.un.org/ga/search/view_doc.asp?symbol=A/RES/70/1&ampampampLang=E 

"The 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets which we are announcing today demonstrate the scale and ambition of this new universal Agenda. They seek to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what they did not achieve" (p. 1). 

"The Goals and targets will stimulate action over the next 15 years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet" (p. 2). 

 

Millennium summit (6-8 September 2000)

The United Nations. (2000). Millennium summit (6-8 September 2000). Retrieved from http://www.un.org/en/events/pastevents/millennium_summit.shtml

In September 2000, building upon a decade of major United Nations conferences and summits, world leaders came together at United Nations Headquarters to adopt the United Nations Millennium Declaration, committing their nations to a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty and setting out a series of time-bound targets - with a deadline of 2015 - that have become known as the Millennium Development Goals. These are the goals that precede the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. 

 

Report of the expert group meeting: Family policy development: achievements and challenges

Division for Social Policy and Development Family. (2015). Report of the expert group meeting: Family policy development: achievements and challenges. Retrieved from http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/family/docs/egm15/finalreport.pdf

"The primary objective of the Meeting was to provide Member States and other stakeholders with expert analysis regarding a number of issues impacting recent family policy developments" (p. 9). 

"The meeting concluded with recommendations for advancing several family policy areas relating to draft post-2015 development agenda, such as ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages; achieving gender equality and empowering women and girls; reducing inequality and ensuring access to justice" (p. 9). 

 

Ontario early years child and family centres

Government of Ontario. (2016). Ontario early years child and family centres. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/plan_report.html

This public plan offers a comprehensive explanation by the Ontario government regarding child and family programs and the transformations that will be taking place in the upcoming two years. This resource provides the government’s vision, expectations, and goals in transforming these child and family programs.

 

Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres: A public plan

Government of Ontario. (2016). Ontario Early Years Child and Family Centres: A public plan. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/plan_oeycfc.pdf

“This is in line with recommendations from the report, With Our Best Future in Mind: Implementing Early Learning in Ontario. Since that time, the government has spoken to families, educators, municipalities, and other key stakeholders across the province, to determine the best way to realize this ambitious goal. Our action plan is based on this valuable input, and builds on the successes we have already had in transforming the early years in Ontario. It also describes how we will deliver on this commitment together” (p. 2-3).

 

Labour market participation of immigrant and Canadian-born wives, 2006 to 2014

Statistics Canada. (2016). Labour market participation of immigrant and Canadian-born wives, 2006 to 2014. Retrieved from http://www.statcan.gc.ca

“Immigrant wives participate less often in the labour market than Canadian-born wives, and about half of the observed difference is attributable to socioeconomic characteristics, according to a new study” (para. 1).

 

Take the day: Why California’s new sick day law is important for parents everywhere

Lim, J. (2015). Take the day: Why California’s new sick day law is important for parents everywhere. Retrieved from https://www.fatherly.com/californias-new-sick-day-law-allows-parents-to-use-paid-sick-days-to-t-1533357572.html?utm_source=Iterable&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=iterable_campaign

“California is once again getting all progressive when it comes to family leave. The state, which is already home to the most paternity-leave-taking dads, signed into law a bill that requires companies with more than 25 employees to provide up to 40 hours a year for working parents to take paid days off for ‘child-related activities’ ” (para. 1).

 

Opportunity, responsibility, and security: A consensus plan for reducing poverty and restoring the American dream

AEI/Brookings Working Group on Poverty and Opportunity. (2015). Opportunity, responsibility, and security: A consensus plan for reducing poverty and restoring the American dream. Retrieved from http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Research/Files/Reports/2015/12/aei-brookings-poverty-report/Full-Report.pdf?la=en

“We believe that we have come up with the most comprehensive and balanced analysis available anywhere on the current causes of American poverty. Based on that analysis, we have offered a detailed plan for reducing poverty by increasing opportunity, responsibility, and security” (p. 73).

 

Sustainable development goals

United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. (2015). Sustainable development goals. Retrieved from https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/?menu=1300

"Click on goals to show targets and topics related to the Sustainable Development Goals as defined in Transforming Our World - the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development" (para. 1). The first goal listed is "End poverty in all its forms everywhere" (para. 2).

 

Minister of Families, Children and Social Development mandate letter

Trudeau, J. (2015). Minister of Families, Children and Social Development mandate letter. Retrieved from http://pm.gc.ca/eng/minister-families-children-and-social-development-mandate-letter

Canada's Prime Minister sets the following as a top priority for Mr. Duclos, Canada's Minister of Families, Children and Social Development: "To lead the development of a Canadian Poverty Reduction Strategy that would set targets to reduce poverty and measure and publicly report on our progress, in collaboration with the Minister of Employment, Workforce Development and Labour. Our strategy will align with and support existing provincial and municipal poverty reduction strategies" (para. 20).

 

Community hubs in Ontario: A strategic framework and action plan

Premier’s Community Hubs Framework Advisory Group. (2015). Community hubs in Ontario: A strategic framework and action plan.  Retrieved from https://www.ontario.ca/page/community-hubs-ontario-strategic-framework-and-action-plan  

The Premier’s Community Hubs Framework Advisory Group reports potential challenges, a strategic framework, and an action plan for delivering public services through local, community hubs in Ontario, following consultation with community members, stakeholders, and other government ministries.

 

Provincial government launches Early Learning and Child Care Directory

Executive Council, Education and Early Childhood Development. (2015, September 2). Provincial government launches Early Learning and Child Care Directory. Retrieved from http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/2015/exec/0902n04.aspx

“Families with young children now have the opportunity to easily access information on regulated child care services and family resource centres located throughout Newfoundland and Labrador using an online interactive database. The new Early Learning and Child Care Directory was launched today and can be viewed at childcare.gov.nl.ca.” (para. 1).

 

The report of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills 2015: Early years

Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills. (2015). The report of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills 2015: Early years. Retrieved from UK Government website: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/445730/Early_years_report_2015.pdf

This is the second annual early years report published by the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills of the UK Government. The publication reflects on changes unfolding in the early years sector. 

 

The impact of New Brunswick’s 2009-2014 economic and social inclusion plan

Economic and Social Inclusion Corporation. (2015). The impact of New Brunswick’s 2009-2014 economic and social inclusion plan. Retrieved from http://www2.gnb.ca/content/dam/gnb/Departments/esic/pdf/ImpactOfNBEconomicAndSocialInclusionPlan.pdf

This report evaluates the impact of Overcoming Poverty Together: The New Brunswick Economic and Social Inclusion Plan 1 (2009-2014).

 

Second legislative review of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disability Act, 2005

Moran, M. (2014, November). Second legislative review of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disability Act, 2005. Retrieved from https://www.ontario.ca/document/legislative-review-accessibility-ontarians-disabilities-act

“The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act must be reviewed regularly. Mayo Moran, Provost and Vice-Chancellor of Trinity College at the University of Toronto, reviewed the Act and conducted consultations between 2013 and 2014.  This report presents her recommendations to the government” (para. 1).

 

Ontario reg. 137/15: General

Ontario reg. 137/15: General. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/r15137

The Child Care and Early Years Act comes into force on August 31, 2015 and will change the rules affecting licensed and unlicensed child care providers in Ontario. Ontario Regulation 137/15 sets rules for ratios, buildings, equipment, and playgrounds, health and medical supervision, nutrition, the program for children, staff qualification and screening, emergency preparedness, and administrative matters. 

 

Ontario regulation 138/15: Funding, cost sharing and financial assistance

Government of Ontario. (2015). Ontario regulation 138/15: Funding, cost sharing and financial assistance. Retrieved from http://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/r15138

Ontario Regulation 138/15 sets rules for financial assistance for parents, apportionment of costs across municipalities, and funding for capital projects.  The Child Care and Early Years Act comes into force on August 31, 2015.

 

A Canada fit for children 2015: Identity, rights, and belonging

Pearson, L. (2015). A Canada fit for children 2015: Identity, rights, and belonging. Retrieved from Landon Pearson Resource Centre for the Study of Childhood and Children’s Rights website:http://www.landonpearson.ca/uploads/6/0/1/4/6014680/a_canada_fit_for_children_2015.pdf

“A Canada Fit for Children 2015 is my third and final attempt to draft an action plan for Canada’s children. The first two were official. This one is not; rather, it is a testament for and a tribute to all the young people to whom I have been listening for so many years and a show of confidence in their capacity to make a difference for themselves and for the rest of us” (p. 3). 

 

Safe, healthy, and ready to learn: Policy recommendations to ensure children thrive in supportive communities free from violence and trauma

Futures Without Violence. (2015). Safe, healthy, and ready to learn: Policy recommendations to ensure children thrive in supportive communities free from violence and trauma. Retrieved from http://d3vc4vygg8dc62.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/Safe-Healthy-and-Ready-to-Learn_Full-Report.pdf

“This report serves as an important component of a larger national campaign to address childhood exposure to violence and trauma and to invest in the safety, health, and educational success of all children” (p. 7). 

 

Budget 2015

Government of Canada. (2015). Budget 2015. Retrieved from http://www.budget.gc.ca/2015/home-accueil-eng.html

The Budget 2015 website includes links to the federal government’s budget plan and related  speeches, plus information about government initiatives. 

 

Ontario budget 2015

Government of Ontario. (2015). Ontario Budget 2015. Retrieved from http://www.ontario.ca/government/ontario-budget-2015

Access Ontario’s 2015 provincial budget or read highlights of the budget from the Ontario budget 2015 website.

 

Shift - Enhancing the health of Ontarians: A call to action for preconception health promotion and care

Ontario Public Health Association. (2014). Shift - Enhancing the health of Ontarians: A call to action for preconception health promotion and care. Retrieved from http://opha.on.ca/getmedia/e835a9ea-a121-46a4-af27-dd2ff1f58870/OPHA-Shift-Enhancing-the-health-of-Ontarians-A-call-to-action-for-preconception-health-promotion-and-care.pdf.aspx

“[T]he Ontario Public Health Association (OPHA) Reproductive Health Workgroup has developed this position paper to advocate for coordinated and comprehensive action in the area of preconception health (PCH) in Ontario. Our aim is to shift public and political awareness and understanding of reproductive health to include PCH” (p. 9). 

 

Dignity for all: A national anti-poverty plan for Canada

Dignity for All. (2015). Dignity for all: A national anti-poverty plan for Canada. Retrieved from the Canada without Poverty website: http://www.cwp-csp.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/DignityForAll_Report-English-FINAL.compressed.pdf

This document presents the key planks of an anti-poverty plan that, if implemented, will make a meaningful difference in the lives of low-income Canadians, achieving greater prosperity and security for all” (p. 3).

 

Moving forward: Challenges faced by child-and-youth serving agencies in Canada

National Alliance for Children and Youth. (2014). Moving forward: Challenges faced by child-and-youth serving agencies in CanadaThe Philanthropist, 16(2), 197-212. Retrieved from http://thephilanthropist.ca/original-pdfs/Philanthropist-26-2-3615.pdf

“This article provides a synopsis of the collective findings from [an] extensive process of engagement and follow-up research. The major themes that emerged from this work include what were seen as the key stressors in the sector as well possible answers to the challenges that organizations are experiencing” (p. 197). 

 

Balanced budget 2015

Province of British Columbia. (2015). Balanced Budget 2015. Retrieved from http://bcbudget.gov.bc.ca/2015/default.htm

Documents and videos related to British Columbia’s 2015 budget and 2015-2017 fiscal plan can be accessed from this website.  

 

Ending child poverty now

Children’s Defense Fund. (2014). Ending child poverty now. Retrieved from http://www.childrensdefense.org/library/PovertyReport/EndingChildPovertyNow.html

This document reports the child poverty rate in the United States of America and its impacts and suggests how to alleviate poverty. “For the first time, this report shows that by investing an additional 2 percent of the federal  budget into existing programs and policies that increase employment, make work pay, and ensure children’s basic needs are met, the nation could reduce child poverty by 60 percent and lift 6.6 million children out of poverty (Overview section,  para. 1). 

 

Shared parental leave: Public attitudes

Opinion Matters. (2015). Shared parental leave: Public attitudes. Retrieved from https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/394623/bis-15-32-shared-parenting-leave-public-attitudes.pdf

“Opinion Matters were commissioned by the Department for Business Innovation and Skills to carry out research into attitudes to shared parenting. 2,138 adults from across the UK were surveyed between 04 and 11 December 2014 to examine attitudes towards Shared Parenting and assess potential uptake of Shared Parental Leave entitlement” (p. 2). 

 

Sherry Turkle: Connected, but alone?

Turkle, S. (2012, February). Sherry Turkle: Connected, but alone?  Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/sherry_turkle_alone_together?language=en

"As we expect more from technology, do we expect less from each other? Sherry Turkle studies how our devices and online personas are redefining human connection and communication — and asks us to think deeply about the new kinds of connection we want to have".

 

The pregnancy test: Ending discrimination at work for new mothers

Trades Union Congress House. (2014, November). The pregnancy test: Ending discrimination at work for new mothers. Retrieved from http://www.tuc.org.uk/sites/default/files/pregnancytestreport.pdf

"Despite . . . legal rights, pregnancy and maternity leave is still a time when everything changes for many women at work" (p. 2).

 

Parent engagement from preschool through grade 3: A guide for policymakers

Smith, S., Robbins, T., Stagman, S., & Mathur, D. (2013 September). Parent engagement from preschool through grade 3: A guide for policymakers. New York: National Center for Children in Poverty. Retrieved from http://www.nccp.org/publications/pdf/text_1084.pdf

"Parent engagement in children’s education is increasingly viewed as an essential support to children’s learning in early care and education programs and throughout the school years. This report makes the case that effective parent engagement during the span from preschool through the early grades is a key contributor to children’s positive academic outcomes" (page. 3). 

 

What would childcare look like if the government really cared?

PSAC. (2014, November 14). What would childcare look like if the government really cared? PSAC. Retrieved from http://psacunion.ca/what-would-childcare-look-if-government-really-cared

"What could childcare look like in 2020, if our federal and provincial governments actually invested in a universal and affordable system? Parents could drop their children at inviting childcare centres that provide educational and culturally-relevant programs. Home daycare providers could earn decent wages and network together to share skills and experiences. Women could participate fully in the workforce, knowing that their children are in nurturing and safe environments. And families of all stripes could begin saving for their children’s post-secondary education and their own retirements, free from the burden of the “double mortgage years" (para. 1). This resource includes a short video. 

Also available in french: http://syndicatafpc.ca/servicesdegarde?_ga=1.97982751.1252817353.1416416257

 

Families at the Centre: What do low income families say about care and education for their young children?

UNSW Australia. (2014, November). Families at the Centre: What do low income families say about care and education for their young children?  Sydney: Social Policy Research Centre, UNSW Australia. Retrieved from https://www.sprc.unsw.edu.au/media/SPRCFile/2014_Families_at_the_Centre__What_do_low_income_families_say.pdf

"Early childhood education and care (ECEC) is a major focus of public policy, public debate and social expenditure in Australia and internationally. The benefits o participation in high quality ECEC are especially strong for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. Despite a surge of interest in early childhood education, there is little information about how early childhood services operate at the local level, how parents make decisions about the use of ECEC services, how they negotiate local markets and how they understand the subsidies and rules that govern access to ECEC" (pg. 3).

 

The parent trap: Child care fees in Canada's big cities

Macdonald, D., & Friendly, M. (2014 November). The parent trap: Child care fees in Canada's big cities. CCPA. Retrieved from https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2014/11/Parent_Trap.pdf

"While Canada spends less on early childhood education and care than most OECD countries, Canadian parents are among the most likely to be employed. As Canadian parents are working parents, child care fees can play a major role i decision-making and labour force participation, particularly for women. This study examines, for the first time, median unsubsidized child care fees in Canada's big cities for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. It also develops an affordability index that compares child care fees to women's income" (pg. 5).

 

Time for Preschool

Time for Preschool. (n.d.). Time for Preschool. Retrieved from http://timeforpreschool.ca/en/

This website shares research, statistics, and reports that discuss the need for a national preschool and early learning plan in Canada. The website includes a link to download Early Childhood Education Report 2014:
Public policy shapes early childhood programs
 published by Ontario Institute for Studies in Education/ University of Toronto

 

The evolution of Canada's child care debates

Pasolli, L. (2014, November 3). The evolution of Canada's child care debatesBroadbent Institute. Retrieved from http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/evolution-canadas-child-care-debates

"Canadians have long grappled with the meanings and purposes of child care. As Canadians gather for ChildCare2020 -- the country's fourth national child care policy conference -- in Winnipeg on November 13, it’s worthwhile to reflect on how child care debates have unfolded over the past several decades, and particularly how the three previous national conferences -- in 1971, 1982, and 2004 -- acted as important landmarks in the sometimes-rocky landscape of Canadian child care history" (para. 1,2).

 

The evolution of Canada's child care debates

Pasolli, L. (2014, November 3). The evolution of Canada's child care debatesBroadbent Institute. Retrieved from http://www.broadbentinstitute.ca/en/blog/evolution-canadas-child-care-debates

"Canadians have long grappled with the meanings and purposes of child care. As Canadians gather for ChildCare2020 -- the country's fourth national child care policy conference -- in Winnipeg on November 13, it’s worthwhile to reflect on how child care debates have unfolded over the past several decades, and particularly how the three previous national conferences -- in 1971, 1982, and 2004 -- acted as important landmarks in the sometimes-rocky landscape of Canadian child care history" (para. 1,2).

 

Read and vote: Should all Canadians receive subsidized daycare?

The Globe and Mail. (2014, October 23). Read and vote: Should all Canadians receive subsidized daycare? The Globe and Mail. Retrieved from http://m.theglobeandmail.com/globe-debate/read-and-vote-should-all-canadians-receive-subsidized-daycare/article21258109/?service=mobile&click=sf_globe

"Debate: The federal New Democratic Party recently unveiled a national, universal daycare plan as a key plank in its platform ahead of next year's federal election. Two policy experts debate whether a universal program applied to all Canadians regardless of income is the proper approach, or whether a means-tested program targeted to lower-income families would be of greater benefit to lower-income Canadians. Read both opinions, and use the box on the right to vote on the one you find most persuasive."

 

The Moving Child Care Forward Project

Moving Child Care Forward. (n.d.). The Moving Child Care Forward Project. Retrieved from http://www.movingchildcareforward.ca/

"The Moving Child Care Forward Project, funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada’s Connections program, is designed to broaden and deepen debate and understanding of early childhood education and child care (ECEC) policy issues. The project’s goals: knowledge mobilization to promote research, inform public and policy dialogue and to develop effective responses to complex policy issues to better serve young children and their families."

 

2014 Mandate letter: Education

Wynne, K. (2014, September 25). 2014 Mandate letter: Education. Government of Ontario. Retrieved from https://www.ontario.ca/government/2014-mandate-letter-education

"As we implement a balanced and comprehensive plan for Ontario, we will lead from the activist centre. We will place emphasis on partnerships with businesses, communities and people to help foster continued economic growth and make a positive impact on the lives of every Ontarian. This collaborative approach will shape all the work we do. It will ensure we engage people on the issues that matter the most to them, and that we implement meaningful solutions to our shared challenges" (para. 1).

 

Challenges and opportunities : Early childhood education in Yunan

Liang, X., Zhang, Y., & Fu, Y. (2014). Challenges and opportunities: Early childhood education in Yunan. Retrieved from The World Bank Group website: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2014/08/15/000470435_20140815072822/Rendered/PDF/ACS69150REPLAC00Box385296B00PUBLIC0.pdf

"In 2012, the Yunnan department of education formally requested Bank support in conducting a review of early childhood education policies and programs in order to gain an in-depth and evidence-based understanding of the challenges the province faces in expanding early childhood education-in particular to rural and mountainous regions. . . . This report presents the findings from the background studies, and draws potential policy implications for improving the access to and quality of preschool education in Yunnan province" (p. 3).

 

Research to Action: Family friendly services in Peel

Peel Children and Youth Initiative. (2014, June 24). Research to Action: Family friendly services in Peel [Video file]. Retrieved from http://pcyi.wordpress.com/2014/06/24/research-to-action-family-friendly-services-in-peel/

"In 2012, the Peel Children and Youth Initiative released Building Healthy Child Development: A Study of Parents in Peel examining how parents in Peel access services for their young children ages 0-12 . . . . The data allows us to explore new and innovative ways of providing services in ways that are better aligned with the actual needs, interests and aspirations of the diverse and changing families who live across the Region of Peel" (para. 1).

 

Budget documents (2014 - 2016)

Province of Nova Scotia. (2014). Budget documents (2014 - 2016). Retrieved from http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/en/home/budget/budgetdocuments/2014-2016.aspx

On this website, a table of PDFs provides access to the Budget Address, highlights, and other budget-related documents.

 

Community Services and Seniors annual report for the fiscal year April 2011 to March 2012

Prince Edward Island Ministry of Community Services and Seniors. (2013). Community Services and Seniors annual report for the fiscal year April 2011 to March 2012. Retrieved from http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/2011-12CSSARE.pdf

"As the Minister for Community Services and Seniors, it is my privilege to submit our annual report for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2012. As well as reporting on the activities of our department during this period, this report satisfies the requirements of Section 5 of the Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons Act and Section 10 of the Social Assistance Act" (Message of the Minister section, para. 4).

 

Budget 2014: Steady growth, good jobs

Manitoba. (2014). Budget 2014: Steady growth, good jobs. Retrieved from http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/index.html

Access Manitoba's 2014 budget, the budget speech, and related tools and news items from this web page.

 

Inclusion Policy

How to prepare your child with disabilities for Kindergarten: Tips for parents

PACER Centre. (2008). How to prepare your child with disabilities for Kindergarten: Tips for parents. Retrieved from http://pacer.org/parent/php/PHP-c179.pdf
 
“Kindergarten is a big step in any child’s life. For a child with disabilities, being ready for that step often requires some intentional preparation. By working with your child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) team, you can plan for your child’s success and make that first school experience a good one” (para. 1).

 

Increased flexibility urged for special ed funding

Heasley, S. (2015, October 30). Increased flexibility urged for special ed funding. Disability Scoop. Retrieved from http://www.disabilityscoop.com/2015/10/23/increased-flexibility-sped/20897/

“A strict requirement that schools keep up their spending on special education year to year may have unintended consequences, federal investigators say” (para. 1).

“In a report this week, the Government Accountability Office . . . warned that the rigid spending requirement could be stifling innovation in special education” (para. 4).

 

Education watch: An update on inclusive education, 5(3)

Inclusive Education Canada. (2015). Education watch: An update on inclusive education, 5(3). Retrieved from https://inclusiveeducationcanada.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/education-watch-v5-i3-summer-2015-inclusive-education-canada-2015.pdf

This newsletter includes an interview with superintendent Peggy Blair and commentary by teachers regarding the Learning for All program in Avon Maitland, Ontario. Peggy Blair, Superintendent of Education (Learning Services) – Avon Maitland District, Ontario provides answers to questions about the Learning for All program, the roles of the teachers working as coaches, and what it means for a school to be inclusive.  

 

The report of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills 2015: Early years

Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills. (2015). The report of Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Education, Children’s Services and Skills 2015: Early years. Retrieved from UK Government website: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/445730/Early_years_report_2015.pdf

This is the second annual early years report published by the Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills of the UK Government. The publication reflects on changes unfolding in the early years sector. 

 

Physical activity for children with special needs

Canadian Active After School Partnership. (n.d.). Physical activity for children with special needs. Retrieved from http://activeafterschool.ca/collection/physical-activity-individuals-special-needs-0

"This collection of resources can support program staff and teachers in enabling children with special needs to be more physically active and engaged in programs" (para. 1). The collection includes documents  activity focused on specific disabilities (e.g., ADHD and Cerebral Palsy) and on specific activities (e.g., soccer and other ball games), plus policies written by governments and recreation centres.

 

Leveling the playing field: A natural progression from playground to podium for Canadians with disabilities

Standing Senate Committee on Human Rights. (2012). Leveling the playing field: A natural progression from playground to podium for Canadians with disabilities. Retrieved from Parliament of Canada website: http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/SEN/Committee/411/ridr/rep/rep07jun12-e.pdf

This report identifies barriers to Canadians with disabilities participating in sport, recreational, and leisure activities and makes recommendations towards Canada honouring the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities for children and adults. 

 

Ontario reg. 137/15: General

Ontario reg. 137/15: General. (2015). Retrieved from http://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/r15137

The Child Care and Early Years Act comes into force on August 31, 2015 and will change the rules affecting licensed and unlicensed child care providers in Ontario. Ontario Regulation 137/15 sets rules for ratios, buildings, equipment, and playgrounds, health and medical supervision, nutrition, the program for children, staff qualification and screening, emergency preparedness, and administrative matters. 

 

Ontario regulation 138/15: Funding, cost sharing and financial assistance

Government of Ontario. (2015). Ontario regulation 138/15: Funding, cost sharing and financial assistance. Retrieved from http://www.ontario.ca/laws/regulation/r15138

Ontario Regulation 138/15 sets rules for financial assistance for parents, apportionment of costs across municipalities, and funding for capital projects.  The Child Care and Early Years Act comes into force on August 31, 2015.

 

National household survey (NHS)

Statistics Canada. (2015). National household survey (NHS) Retrieved from http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/nhs-enm/index-eng.cfm

Reference material explaining the National Household Survey (NHS), as well as data collected through the survey in 2011 and analyses of the data, can be accessed through this  Statistics Canada website. 

 

Budget 2015

Government of Canada. (2015). Budget 2015. Retrieved from http://www.budget.gc.ca/2015/home-accueil-eng.html

The Budget 2015 website includes links to the federal government’s budget plan and related  speeches, plus information about government initiatives. 

 

Ontario budget 2015

Government of Ontario. (2015). Ontario Budget 2015. Retrieved from http://www.ontario.ca/government/ontario-budget-2015

Access Ontario’s 2015 provincial budget or read highlights of the budget from the Ontario budget 2015 website.

 

Considering LRE in placement decisions

Centre for Parent Information and Resources. (2014). Considering LRE in placement decisions. Retrieved from http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/placement-lre/

"LRE [least restrictive environment] refers to the setting where a child with a disability can receive an appropriate education designed to meet his or her educational needs, alongside peers without disabilities to the maximum extent appropriate" (Summarizing LRE section, para. 1). This web page defines key terms in LRE and provides information related to creating the least restrictive environment.

 

Moving forward: Challenges faced by child-and-youth serving agencies in Canada

National Alliance for Children and Youth. (2014). Moving forward: Challenges faced by child-and-youth serving agencies in CanadaThe Philanthropist, 16(2), 197-212. Retrieved from http://thephilanthropist.ca/original-pdfs/Philanthropist-26-2-3615.pdf

“This article provides a synopsis of the collective findings from [an] extensive process of engagement and follow-up research. The major themes that emerged from this work include what were seen as the key stressors in the sector as well possible answers to the challenges that organizations are experiencing” (p. 197). 

 

Able Mothers: The intersection of parenting, disability and the law

Track, L. (2014 September). Able Mothers: The intersection of parenting, disability and the law. Retrieved from http://www.westcoastleaf.org/userfiles/file/Able%20Mothers%20Final%20Report.pdf

"Women with disabilities are subject to the discriminatory attitudes of a disabling society on a daily basis. When they become or seek to become mothers, these biases too often influence the views of those best positioned to support them, including government officials, health care professionals, child protection workers, and parenting assessors. As a result, their particular needs as disables parents go unmet, with negative consequences for both mothers and their children" (para. 1).

 

Labour & employment news summer 2014 newsletter

Borden Ladner Gervais. (Summer 2014). Labour & employment news summer 2014 newsletter. Borden Ladner Gervais. Retrieved from http://www.blg.com/en/NewsAndPublications

"This edition features articles on damages under human rights legislation, the application of the reasonable notice doctrine across the border, and workplace stress claims under workplace safety and insurance legislation. In addition, it outlines new leaves of absence coming into effect in Ontario this fall under employment standards legislation, [which includes new family caregiver leave policies]. And finally, a recent case on employee rights on a sale of business in Quebec is outlined" (para. 1).

 

Education funding, 2014-2015

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2014). Education funding, 2014-2015. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/funding/index.html

"Each year the ministry provides funds to school boards through a series of grants. This page contains information on this year's grants, plus links to information on grants from previous years" (para. 1). This web page includes links to publications regarding special education funding.

 

CMEC early learning and development framework

CMEC Early Childhood Learning and Development Working Group. (2014). CMEC early learning and development framework. Retrieved from Council of Ministers of Education, Canada website: http://www.cmec.ca/Publications/Lists/Publications/Attachments/327/2014-07-Early-Learning-Framework-EN.pdf

"This framework, which builds on provincial/territorial objectives and the Pan-Canadian approach to early learning and development, provides guiding principles for education policy and curriculum to support the development of quality early learning programs. It also identifies areas for future consideration" (p. 4). 

 

Parliamentary inquiry into childcare for disabled children

Contact a Family, Every Disabled Child Matters, Family and Childcare Trust, & Working Families. (2014). Parliamentary inquiry into childcare for disabled children. Retrieved from http://www.cafamily.org.uk/media/775034/report_on_parliamentary_
inquiry_into_childcare_for_disabled_children_.pdf

This report from the United Kingdom finds: "Today, only one quarter of local authorities say they have enough childcare for disabled children . . . . Parents report it is more difficult in both finding and paying for childcare for disabled children compared to non-disabled children" (p 4).

 

A guide to balancing work and caregiving obligations

Canadian Human Rights Commission. (2014). A guide to balancing work and caregiving obligations. Retrieved from http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/sites/default/files/a_guide_to_balancing_work.pdf

"This guide provides tips for developing accommodation solutions that are in harmony with human rights law. It outlines the rights and responsibilities of the employee, the employer, unions and/or employee representatives. The guide takes managers through the process of accommodating an employee’s need to care for a family member by providing information on how to discuss the issue, how to develop solutions, and how to ensure that the solutions are effective" (p. 1).

 

2014 issue briefs

Council for Exceptional Children. (2014). 2014 issue briefs. Retrieved from http://www.cec.sped.org/Policy-and-Advocacy/Current-Sped-Gifted-Issues/2014-Issue-Briefs?utm_source=Policy+Insider+-+July+2%2C+2014&utm_campaign=PI+July+2&utm_medium=email

This resource offers issue briefs on the following subjects: (1) improving outcomes for children with disability through high-quality early learning programs, (2) promoting access and achievement for children and youth with exceptionalities i PK-12 education, (3) preparing future educators to meet the needs of children with disabilities, (4) special education research and development: supporting educational excellence for children and youth with disabilities, (5) expanding the federal role in gifted education, and (6) investing in special and gifted education: impacting 10 million children and families, (7) United Nations Convention on the rights of persons with disabilities.

 

Education Act

Yukon Legislative Council Office. (n.d.). Education act. Retrieved from Government of Yukon website: http:www.gov.yk.ca/legislation/acts/education_c.pdf

Division 2 of Yukon's Education Act addresses special education.

 

Chapter 6: Special needs education

Office of the Auditor General-Manitoba. (2012). Chapter 6: Special needs education. Retrieved from http://www.oag.mb.ca/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/6-Special-Needs-web.pdf

"We examined Education’s systems and practices for supporting the quality of special needs education, funding special needs education, and measuring and reporting special needs education performance information. . . . Education had developed regulations, standards, and guidelines that clearly outlined its expectations for the delivery of special needs education, but it was not monitoring for compliance. We found a low level of school division compliance with certain key standards, underlining the need for better monitoring" (p. 249).

 

MacKay report

New Brunswick Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (n.d.) MacKay report. Retrieved from  http://www.gnb.ca/0000/publications/mackay/mackay-e.asp

This web page links to the MacKay report on inclusive education programming and services in New Brunswick, as well as frequently asked questions about the report.

 

Inclusion BC talks about inclusion for students with special needs in our schools

Canadian Association for Community Living. (2014, June 18). Inclusion BC talks about inclusion for students with special needs in our schools [Web log comment]. Retrieved from http://www.cacl.ca/news-stories/blog/inclusion-bc-talks-about-inclusion-students-special-needs-our-schools#sthash.dZ3D0Z0T.dpuf

"Inclusion BC talked about the importance of inclusion for students with special needs in our schools, on CKNW AM 980 - The Bill Good Show 10:30-11:00am Pacific on June 17th. Faith Bodnar, Executive Director of Inclusion BC, was live with host Bill Good that morning, to provide the perspective of Inclusive Education as compared to other view points shared that morning" (para. 1).

 

2014 Ontario budget

Ontario Ministry of Finance. 2014 Ontario budget. Retrieved from http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/budget/ontariobudgets/2014/

The full budget and related documents and announcements, including the budget speech, are available from this website.

 

Budget documents (2014 - 2016)

Province of Nova Scotia. (2014). Budget documents (2014 - 2016). Retrieved from http://www.novascotia.ca/finance/en/home/budget/budgetdocuments/2014-2016.aspx

On this website, a table of PDFs provides access to the Budget Address, highlights, and other budget-related documents.

 

Background paper: Overview of studies related to persons with disabilities, House of Commons 1981-2012

Collin, C. (2012). Background paper: Overview of studies related to persons with disabilities, House of Commons 1981-2012. (Publication No. 2012-84-E). Retrieved from http://www.parl.gc.ca/Content/LOP/ResearchPublications/2012-84-e.pdf

This paper provides a summary of the studies and reports of the Standing Committee on Human Resources, Skills and Social Development and the Status of Persons with Disabilities and its previous Sub-committees and predecessors.

 

Learning for all: A guide to effective assessment instruction for all students, kindergarten to grade 12 (Draft ed.)

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2011). Learning for all: A guide to effective assessment instruction for all students, kindergarten to grade 12 (Draft ed.). Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/speced/learningforall2011.pdf

"This resource guide outlines an integrated process of assessment and instruction designed to improve student learning at both the elementary and secondary levels. . . .The key beliefs that drive the process outlined in this guide were first articulated in Education for All, K–6 and are now shared among various ministry initiatives designed to help all students improve their achievement. . . . Learning for All, K–12 describes educational approaches that are based on one of the most
important findings of educational research since 2000 – namely, that all students learn best when instruction, resources, and the learning environment are well-suited to their particular strengths, interests, needs, and stage of readiness " (pp. 6-7).

 

Budget 2014 - Shared prosperity, fair society, balanced outlook

Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. (2014). Budget 2014 - Shared prosperity, fair society, balanced outlook. Retrieved from http://www.budget.gov.nl.ca/budget2014/

The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador delivered its 2014 budget on March 27, with provisions for children and families.

 

Nova Scotia alternative budget 2014

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Nova Scotia Office. (2014). Nova Scotia alternative budget 2014: A budget for the 99%. Retrieved from https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publications/reports/nova-scotia-alternative-budget-2014

The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - Nova Scotia Office suggests an alternative budget for achieving economic and social justice.

 

Community Services and Seniors annual report for the fiscal year April 2011 to March 2012

Prince Edward Island Ministry of Community Services and Seniors. (2013). Community Services and Seniors annual report for the fiscal year April 2011 to March 2012. Retrieved from http://www.gov.pe.ca/photos/original/2011-12CSSARE.pdf

"As the Minister for Community Services and Seniors, it is my privilege to submit our annual report for the fiscal year ending March 31, 2012. As well as reporting on the activities of our department during this period, this report satisfies the requirements of Section 5 of the Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons Act and Section 10 of the Social Assistance Act" (Message of the Minister section, para. 4).

 

Budget 2014: Steady growth, good jobs

Manitoba. (2014). Budget 2014: Steady growth, good jobs. Retrieved from http://www.gov.mb.ca/finance/budget14/index.html

Access Manitoba's 2014 budget, the budget speech, and related tools and news items from this web page.

 

Family supports

Canadian Association for Community Living. (2013). Family supports. Retrieved from http://www.cacl.ca/area/family-supports

The Canadian Association for Living articulates its vision of family supports as one of ten steps toward inclusive communities.

 

Ontario Early Years Policy Framework

Ontario Ministry of Education. (2013). Ontario Early Years Policy Framework. Retrieved from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/childcare/OntarioEarlyYear.pdf

 “The Ontario Early Years Policy Framework builds on our collective progress and provides a vision for the early years to ensure children, from birth to age six, have the best possible start in life. The framework is supported by a set of principles and is meant to provide strategic direction to our early years partners both within and outside of government. Moving forward, the Ontario Early Years Policy Framework will guide our collective approach to the development and delivery of early years programs and services for children and families” (p. 3).

 

Policy 322

New Brunswick Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. (2013). Policy 322. Retrieved from http://www.gnb.ca/0000/pol/e/322A.pdf

New Brunswick’s first inclusive education policy was signed on September 17, 2013. Policy 322 outlines the goals and principles of inclusive education and the requirements of inclusive education, including the standards of the common learning environment and expectations for school personnel supporting inclusion.

 

"Special" education revisited

Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education. (2013). “Special” education revisited. [Online video]. Available from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XO0sJEbNo-s&feature=youtu.be

This animated video tells the history of education for children with special needs.

 

Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools

Inclusion BC. (2013). Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools. Retrieved from http://www.inclusionbc.org/stophurtingkids

Read or listen to data collected through an online survey of approximately 200 parents and guardians whose children had been restrained or secluded in British Columbia schools.

 

Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools – Survey results and recommendations

Inclusion BC and the Family Support Institute of BC. (2013). Stop hurting kids: Restraint and seclusion in BC schools – Survey results and recommendations. Retrieved from http://www.inclusionbc.org/sites/default/files/StopHurtingKids-Report.pdf

In July 2013, an online self-report survey was used to gain insight into BC students’ experiences with restraint and seclusion. From the results, Inclusion BC and the Family Support Institute of BC conclude that restraint and seclusion are systemic issues with negative impacts upon the learning environment, inclusive education, and students’ emotional health and well-being.