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The Glass Obstacle Course: Informal and Formal Barriers For Women Ph.D. Students in STEM Fields, external link

Authors: Kris De Welde and Sandra L. Laursen. Florida Gulf Coast University, U.S. University of Colorado Boulder, U.S.

Description: "A new metaphor is proposed for understanding the experiences of women pursuing Ph.D.s in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, based on a study of students in a U.S. Ph.D. program."

 

Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder, external link

Author: Ian M. Handleya, Elizabeth R. Brown, Corinne A. Moss-Racusin, and Jessi L. Smith

Description: "Ever-growing empirical evidence documents a gender bias against women and their research—and favoring men—in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Our research examined how receptive the scientific and public communities are to experimental evidence demonstrating this gender bias, which may contribute to women’s underrepresentation within STEM. Results from our three experiments, using general-public and university faculty samples, demonstrated that men evaluate the quality of research unveiling this bias as less meritorious than do women. These findings may inform and fuel self-correction efforts within STEM to reduce gender bias, bolster objectivity and diversity in STEM workforces, and enhance discovery, education, and achievement."

Why do women choose or reject careers in academic medicine? A narrative review of empirical evidence, external link

Authors: Laurel D. Edmunds et al.

Description: "Women are under-represented in academic medicine. We reviewed the empirical evidence focusing on the reasons for women’s choice or rejection of careers in academic medicine."

Occasional Paper: Busting Myths About Women In STEM, external link

Author: Australia’s Chief Scientist

Description: The Office of the Chief Scientist has published the 13th paper in the Occasional Paper Series, Busting myths about Women in STEM.

New Survey Highlights Gender, Racial Harassment in Astronomy and Planetary Science, external link

Author: Joint Release

Description: "In a survey of workplace experiences among astronomy and planetary science professionals, about 40 percent of women of color reported feeling unsafe in their workplace because of their gender, while 28 percent feel unsafe due to their race. About 13 percent of the survey’s female respondents reported skipping at least one class, meeting, fieldwork opportunity or other professional event for this reason. Some men of color also skipped events as a result of hearing racist comments at school or work, according to a external,new study detailing the survey’s results in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, a journal of the American Geophysical Union."

Choice of Majors: Are Women Really Different from Men?, external link

Authors: Adriana D. Kugler, Catherine H. Tinsley, Olga Ukhaneva

Description: "Recent work suggests that women are more responsive to negative feedback than men in certain environments. We examine whether negative feedback in the form of relatively low grades in major-related classes explains gender differences in the final majors undergraduates choose.[...]"

Twenty Years of Stereotype Threat Research: A Review of Psychological Mediators, external link

Authors: Charlotte R. Pennington, Derek Heim, Andrew R. Levy, and Derek T. Larkin

Abstract: This systematic literature review appraises critically the mediating variables of stereotype threat. A bibliographic search was conducted across electronic databases between 1995 and 2015. The search identified 45 experiments from 38 articles and 17 unique proposed mediators that were categorized into affective/subjective (n = 6), cognitive (n = 7) and motivational mechanisms (n = 4). Empirical support was accrued for mediators such as anxiety, negative thinking, and mind-wandering, which are suggested to co-opt working memory resources under stereotype threat. Other research points to the assertion that stereotype threatened individuals may be motivated to disconfirm negative stereotypes, which can have a paradoxical effect of hampering performance. However, stereotype threat appears to affect diverse social groups in different ways, with no one mediator providing unequivocal empirical support. Underpinned by the multi-threat framework, the discussion postulates that different forms of stereotype threat may be mediated by distinct mechanisms.

Women and Men in STEM Often at Odds Over Workplace Equity, external link

Authors: Cary Funk and Kim Parker

Description: "Perceived inequities are especially common among women in science, technology, engineering and math jobs who work mostly with men"

Social media for social change in science, external link

Authors: Samantha Z. Yammine, Christine Liu, Paige B. Jarreau, Imogen R. Coe

Editor’s note: "In her Working Life piece “Instagram won’t solve inequality” (16 March, p. 1294), Meghan Wright examined why she feels conflicted reading #scicomm Instagram posts by fellow women scientists. She explained that she recognizes the good they can do, yet it seems unfair that such scientists must devote time to social media outreach to combat systemic inequities. So, she has decided that she prefers to separate her social media use from her scientific activities. Wright named a social media role model at her university—the Science Sam Instagram account run by Samantha Yammine—before detailing why she did not want to participate in this kind of outreach. Although she intended to use Science Sam as an example of social media success, Wright’s critical comments about such outreach were interpreted by some as a sexist and mean-spirited personal attack on Samantha Yammine in particular and women science communicators in general. In this section, Samantha Yammine and colleagues describe the power of social media, the 500 Women Scientists organization responds to the Working Life article, and two scientists recognized by AAAS (the publisher of Science) for public engagement discuss how outreach and institutional reform can go hand in hand. In the Online Buzz box, we provide several excerpts from the online eletters we received."

Assessment of potential bias in research grant peer review in Canada, external link

Authors: Robyn Tamblyn, Nadyne Girard, Christina J. Qian and James Hanley

Description: "Peer review is used to determine what research is funded and published, yet little is known about its effectiveness, and it is suspected that there may be biases. We investigated the variability of peer review and factors influencing ratings of grant applications."

Sex-Disaggregated Systematics in Canadian Time Allocation Committee Telescope Proposal Reviews, external link

Authors: Kristine Spekkens (RMC/Queen's), Nicholas Cofie (Queen's), Dennis R. Crabtree (NRC-Herzberg)

Description: "Recent studies have shown that the proposal peer review processes employed by a variety of organizations to allocate astronomical telescope time produce outcomes that are systematically biased depending on whether proposal's principal investigator (PI) is a man or a woman. Using Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) and Gemini Observatory proposal statistics from Canada over 10 recent proposal cycles, we assess whether or not the mean proposal scores assigned by the National Research Council's (NRC's) Canadian Time Allocation Committee (CanTAC) also correlate significantly with PI sex. Classical t-tests, bootstrap and jackknife replications show that proposals submitted by women were rated significantly worse than those submitted by men. We subdivide the data in order to investigate sex-disaggregated statistics in relation to PI career stage (faculty vs. non-faculty), telescope requested, scientific review panel, observing semester, and the PhD year of faculty PIs. Consistent with the bivariate results, a multivariate regression analysis controlling for other covariates confirmed that PI sex is the only significant predictor of proposal rating scores for the sample as a whole, although differences emerge for proposals submitted by faculty and non-faculty PIs. While further research is needed to explain our results, it is possible that implicit social cognition is at work. NRC and CanTAC have taken steps to mitigate this possibility by altering proposal author lists in order to conceal the PI's identity among co-investigators. We recommend that the impact of this measure on mitigating bias in future observing semesters be quantitatively assessed using statistical techniques such as those employed here."

Creating a Culture of Accessibility in the Sciences, external link

Authors:  Mahadeo Sukhai, Chelsea Mohler

Description: Creating a Culture of Accessibility in the Sciences provides insights and advice on integrating students with disabilities into the STEM fields. Each chapter features research and best practices that are interwoven with experiential narratives.

PDF fileDiversity though inclusive practice, external link

Authors: FemNorthNet & DAWN Canada

Description: The Inclusive Practices Toolkit was created to assist organizations and individuals in planning and carrying out events that facilitate the participation and inclusion of all attendees, regardless of age, gender, sexual orientation, ability, heritage, or culture. This Toolkit includes practical information about budgeting, choosing a location, creating accessible event materials, booking support services, and more.

Ten Simple Rules to Achieve Conference Speaker Gender Balance, external link

Author: Jennifer L. Martin

Description: This article is about achieving gender balance at conferences, because women are often underrepresented in invited speaker lists. I am a woman, and so could be considered to have a conflict of interest.

excel fileSeven Actionable Strategies for Advancing Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine, external link

Authors: Kristin A. Smith, Paola Arlotta, Fiona M. Watt, Susan L. Solomon

Desciption: This article proposes an initial shortlist of recommendations to promote gender equality and stimulate future efforts to level the field.

AWIT’s Podcast Dives Deep into Diversity and Workplace Culture, external link

Author: Kirsten Hoyt

Description: "CompTIA’s Advancing Women in Technology (AWIT) Community has shared a plethora of information over the past year on diversity and inclusion in the workplace, and now it has added a podcast series to the list. Industry leaders like Rokeya Jones, Theresa Caragol, Nancy Hammervik and Tiffani Bova take a deep dive into ways company culture impacts everyone in the office, and how inclusion and collaboration have been proven to drive profits."

Advancing Women in Technology, external link

Author: CompTIA

Description: Advancing Women in Technology (AWIT) believes diversity is good for business and helps companies create inclusive and supportive work environments for all people. The community also provides networking opportunities, develops member-driven initiatives involving women and careers. AWIT supports women working in information technology and helps women and girls discover ways they can play important roles in the industry.

Dream IT Overview – Speak up for Girls in Tech, external link

Descrition: Webinar format. Dream IT is a program that was created by AWIT. It is a collection of materials – slides, videos, handout, discussion notes – that you can download and use.

Recently AWIT Sponsored a webinar, Dream IT Overview: Speak up for Girls in Tech, that provides an overview of the Dream IT materials. This interactive discussion includes a tour of the main slide deck and the online resources. It also includes advice from people who have made Dream IT presentations.

Unconscious Bias Project, external link

Description: The Unconscious Bias Project is a group of scientists, tech workers, and artists working together to promote diversity in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) fields.

Gender Summit 2017, external link

Description: Videos of the different sessions in the Gender Summit 2017.

Understanding Accessibility in Graduate Education for Students with Disabilities in Canada, external link

Authors:  National Educational Association of Disabled Students

Description: "Students who graduate from master’s and PhD programs make substantive contributions to their communities on a regional, provincial and federal level through their employment and other contributions, such as their volunteer work. There is to date a critical lack of research and information about issues faced by graduate students with disabilities. As the number of students with disabilities entering graduate education in Canada continues to increase, disability service providers, financial aid administrators, student life professionals, students themselves, graduate departments, deans and student services directors, and universities as a whole are having to develop new strategies to facilitate their success. This effort is also driven in part by the need to be responsive to evolving provincial legislative landscapes in Canada. Institutions are driving policy and practice guidelines on limited, anecdotal and local experience. No significant research on this population has been undertaken within Canada or the United States, and demographic data sets are lacking. [...]" 

PDF fileWestern Guide to Mentoring Graduate Students Across Cultures, external link

Author: Nanda Dimitrov

Description: "The guide will be a useful resource for faculty members or postdoctoral scholars who supervise “across-cultures.” As a result of increasing internationalization at Western, intercultural interactions not only take place between Canadian faculty and students from overseas, but also between Canadian students and faculty from non-English speaking backgrounds, as well as between scholars and students from two different cultures interacting in the Canadian academic context.[...]"

PDF fileAthena SWAN Awards Handbook

Description: This handbook provides detailed information on submitting applications to ECU’s Athena SWAN Charter awards under the expanded May 2015 criteria.

National Educational Association for Disabled Students, external link

Description: Since its founding in 1986, the National Educational Association of Disabled Students (NEADS), has had the mandate to support full access to education and employment for post-secondary students and graduates with disabilities across Canada.

NEADS is a consumer-controlled, cross-disability charitable organization (corporation # 1007761975RR0001). We represent our constituents through specific projects, resources, research, publications and partnerships. NEADS is governed by a national Board of Directors representative of all of the provinces and territories. 

NSERC: Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, external link

Author: Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Description: NSERC's website on Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. It establishes their commitment, framework, updates, among others.

Ethical and Inspiring Mentorship in STEM symposium, external link

Author: Pinar Gurel

Description: "Among the many roles that scientists play, mentoring younger scientists is one for which researchers are rarely trained. In the current STEM research environment, where lack of funding is but one of the systemic issues young scientists face, the roles, responsibilities, and career trajectories are changing. Organizations such as Future of Research and Rescuing Biomedical Research have been formed in recent years to address many issues in academic research. Others, such as the National Mentoring Research Network, have arisen to address the training needs of those who wish to remain in academia but receive no formal training on how to supervise and mentor students. Still, there are gaps in the cultural awareness and value of being an inspiring leader, promoting a positive work environment, and in having happy, mentally fit employees. [...]"

Where’s the evidence? A little science about bias and gender equality, external link

Author: Curt Rice

Description: This posting lists some links to articles and blog posts on different published studies on gender equity and diversity matters.

Effective Practices for Recruiting and Retaining Women in Physics, external link

Source: APS Physics

Description: “The mark of a successful departmental climate for women is one in which the enthusiasm and ambition of the women undergraduates is transformed smoothly into successful and ambitious women graduate students, with dynamic, forging-ahead female postdocs, energetic junior women faculty, and productive, happy, senior women faculty who all serve as positive role models.”

Five ways men can support more women in leadership, external link

Author: Will Marré

Description: "Here are five approaches that every man can consider now to take a step in that direction. They are part of a wider effort that is being led by the Institute for Leadership Synergy at National University to help businesses leverage the leadership styles of both women and men:

  1. Sponsor women: Identify and advocate women to lead important opportunities.
  2. Coach and mentor: Share executive priorities, key success indicators and financial metrics.
  3. Promote networking opportunities: Create favorable times and circumstances to engage your contacts.
  4. Individual encouragement: Inspire women to grow their careers and see themselves as leaders.
  5. Champion and model inclusiveness and respect: Promote the business case for women, challenge bias, encourage women to be heard in meetings and promote women-supportive policies"

How to be a real Male Champion of Change, external link

Source:  Australia's Science Channel Editors

Description: 

"Delivering positive change that puts an end to sexual harassment and gender inequality for good is going to require conscious and deliberate action by women and men, over and over again.

There are many great programs that are trying to address gender inequality in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics & Medicine). Despite these, deep inequality persists.

Of course women must and will fight for change, but what can men do to support them? We suggest some simple guidelines:

1. Recognise male privilege

2. Challenge male privilege

3. Understand the obstacles women face

4. Develop a comprehensive approach

5. Change the system"

Workshop Activity for Gender Equity Simulation, external link

Description: WAGES is an experiential learning activity designed to educate individuals about the sources and cumulative effects of unconscious gender bias that good intentions alone cannot prevent.

Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: Forging Paths to Enhanced Innovation

Authors: Ryerson University, Faculty of Science and the Canadian Science Policy Centre

Description: This report highlights key findings and unveils action-oriented, effective strategies that leverage diversity in STEM fields to drive innovation in Ontario. Dr. Imogen Coe, Dean of the Faculty of Science and Dr. Mehrdad Hariri, CEO & President of the Canadian Science Policy Center are leading this initiative by hosting key stakeholders including representatives from academia, companies, government, industry associations, innovation supporters and not-for-profit organizations to release findings from the May 29th roundtable which was among the first ever in Ontario to facilitate dialogue, share knowledge and seek best practices from these various sectors.

Symposia:The Next 150 years of Science in Canada: Embedding Equity, Delivering Diversity, external link

Moderated by: Imogen Coe, Professor; Dean, Faculty of Science, Ryerson University

Description: Conference proceeding from the Canandian Science Policy Conference symposium: The Next 150 years of Science in Canada: Embedding Equity, Delivering Diversity.

Women in STEM take to their soapboxes – literally

Author: Tara Siebarth

Description: Soapbox Science trains women working in STEM to engage the public about their research by taking it to the streets.

PDF filePower Hour - Gordon Research Conferences, Membrane Transport Proteins 2018

Author: Dr. Imogen R. Coe

Description: List of resources provided during the Power Hour at the GRC Membrane Transport Proteins 2018. The Power Hour is an opportunity to share stories, learn tips & techniques to become stronger allies in support of the under-represented, hear about the vast literature that supports the contention that diverse contributions to science result in better outcomes.

Women in tech face built-in biases, but opportunities as well #AdaLovelaceDay, external link

Author: Gillian Shaw, Vancouver Sun

Description: This article addresses some of the face built-in biases that women in technology experience.

LEADERSHIP LAB: Closing the gender gap requires commitment of both genders, external link

Author: Luc Villeneuve

Description: Luc Villeneuve is country leader, Canada, at Red Hat, Inc., a global open source leader.

"I was recently at a diversity roundtable hosted by Ryerson University's Faculty of Science where they shared the interesting work of the Australian Human Rights Commission initiative, external,Male Champions of Change. The coalition of male business leaders works to leverage their influence to increase the number of female business leaders in Australia. This innovative idea struck a chord with me. Closing the gender gap is a critical business issue that impacts everyone and requires the talent and power of us all."

What do feminists think of distinct gender roles in other species, for example, in chickens?, external link

Author: Suzanne Sadedin

Description: "I think this is a perfectly reasonable question, and it’s something I’ve spent a good part of my career mulling over. In basically all animal species, males and females do tend to behave in distinct ways, and these distinctions are largely presumed to be biologically hardwired rather than resulting from acculturation — a presumption that is itself fairly safe because most animals don’t have complex cultures."

Smashing the Silicon Valley patriarchy: anti-Lean In strategy puts onus on men, external link

Author: Zoë Corbyn

Description: "Instead of pressuring women in the tech industry to solve sexism, this feminist activist is teaching men how to stop biased behavior."

Meet Bina Khan, product owner at TPS, external link

Author: Asra Rizwan, DAWN

Description: "It was my first day at the engineering university and I was immensely excited about my orientation week. During one of the panel discussions on the orientation day, the deans of different faculties were entertaining questions from the nervous yet enthusiastic freshmen. I saw a hand raised in the front rows, the student rose up and asked confidently, ‘Why don’t engineering universities [decrease the] quota for females? They either get married by final year or never pursue careers.’[…]"

A Metaphor to Retire, external link

Author: David Miller

Description: David Miller argues that it’s time to retire the metaphor of the leaky pipeline when discussing women in science.

Engineering a gender bias, external link

Author: Flynn Murphy

Description: "Female researchers cite their own work less than men. If citations are the currency of science, women are being short-changed. […]"

Better advice for ‘Bothered’, external link

Author: Science, American Association for the Advancement of Science

Description: This article discusses the different critical responses to the deleted Ask Alice post offering advice to "Bothered", where a female postdoc mentioned that her male adviser "won't stop looking down my (her) shirt".

Is Your Office Layout Causing Gender Bias?, external link

Author: Stephanie Vozza

Description: Research by the University of Toronto published in Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice found that work teams made up mostly of women tend to be egalitarian, sharing leadership roles, while work groups made up mostly of men favor hierarchical structures.

Why men don't believe the data on gender bias in science, external link

Author: Alison Coil

Description: "Sex discrimination and harassment in tech, and in science more broadly, is a major reason why women leave the field. Nationally, there has long been handwringing about why women are underrepresented in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), which has led to calls for increased mentoring, better family leave policies, and workshops designed to teach women how to negotiate like men."

Report on Boosting Diversity in STEM: Enough Talk, More Action, external link

Author: Kate Cornick

Description: There has been a lot of enthusiasm from technology leaders embracing diversity in the workplace, despite the fact that many of those same companies boast disproportionately white and male-dominated workforces. It’s not an easy issue to tackle: how can an industry solve its diversity problem? Ryerson University’s Faculty of Science and the Canadian Science Policy Centre approached that question head-on, examining how science, technology, engineering, and math—or STEM—disciplines can encourage gender and racial diversity and equality.

Equality in Science: is getting the numbers right good enough?, external link

Author: Tom Ndekezi

Description: This article addresses the report released by Ryerson University "Equity, Diversity, and Inclusivity in STEM: Forging Paths to Enhanced Innovation", and some of the different barriers to achieve diversity in STEM.

Gender gap in manufacturing won't narrow without more training for women: report, external link

Author: Joanna Smith

Description: "Recruitment efforts to get more women working in manufacturing will fail unless girls get the education and training needed for those jobs, says a new report."

Why Female Students Leave STEM, external link

Author: Nick Roll

Description: "Paper finds that bad grades on their own aren’t enough to prompt a change of major, and neither is the environment, but problems arise when those factors compound one other."

Science after Harper, external link

Author: Laura Stewart

Description: Article describes the development of Science in Canada.

Preaching to The Choir, external link

Author: Rebecca Solnit

Description: "[...]The phrase preaching to the choir properly means hectoring your listeners with arguments they already agree with, and it’s a common sin of radicals, the tendency to denounce others as a way of announcing one’s own virtue. But it can be applied too widely, to malign conversation between people whose beliefs happen to coincide. The phrase implies that political work should be primarily evangelical, even missionary, that the task is to go out and convert the heathens, that talking to those with whom we agree achieves nothing.[...]"

In the wake of #MeToo, a new spotlight on harassment in biomedical science, external link

Author: Leah Samuel

Description: "Alongside the #MeToo movement and a continuing drumbeat of assault allegations, biomedical science has also had its share of accused harassers."

Women ask fewer questions than men at seminars, external link

Author: The Economist

Description: "One theory to explain the low share of women in senior academic jobs is that they have less self-confidence than men. This hypothesis is supported by data in a new working paper, by a team of researchers from five universities in America and Europe. In this study, observers counted the attendees, and the questions they asked, at 247 departmental talks and seminars in biology, psychology and philosophy that took place at 35 universities in ten countries.[...]"

The harassment tax, external link

Author: Lydia Zepeda

Description: "[...]Sexual harassment is draining. It takes up time and energy, and it does not result in anything for one's CV or annual review. It is a productivity tax on women. [...]"

Darwin Was Sexist, and So Are Many Modern Scientists, external link

Author: John Horgan

Description: "For far too long, Darwinian theory has justified sexist attitudes and behavior"

HERstory in Black: Eugenia Duodu, external link

Author: CBC News

Description: "In honour of Black History month, CBC brings you stories from HERstory in Black, a Toronto-based digital photo series profiling 150 black women from the GTA and other parts of Ontario by How She Hustles, a network of 5,000 diverse women."

'Let our Indigenous voices be heard': Indigenous scientists join March for Science, external link

Author: Tim Fontaine

Description: This article talks about the over 1,500 Indigenous scientists and allies who voiced their support during the March for Science.

Learning the Land program combines Indigenous teachings with scientific knowledge, external link

Author: Samanda Brace

Description: "Learning the Land, [is] a program created by the Nature Conservancy of Canada and the Treaty 4 Education Alliance. It combines Indigenous culture and teachings with scientific knowledge about conservation."

Women in STEM take to their soapboxes – literally

Author: Tara Siebarth

Description: Soapbox Science trains women working in STEM to engage the public about their research by taking it to the streets.

Gender disparities and the science of women in organizations and teams, external link

Source: National Science Fdn, Medium

Description: "For Women’s History Month, the National Science Foundation asked social, behavioral, and economic scientists to share details from their research about these disparities and what might be done about them. Today, three researchers share their thoughts on the science investigating women in organizations and teams."

The man who’s fighting girls’ ‘mathematophobia’, external link

Author: Paul Hunter

Description: "University of Toronto assistant professor Ismael Mourifié teaches economics but he’s made his name researching why more women don’t pursue jobs in STEM. Some of the answers may be simpler than we think."

Social media for social change in science, external link

Authors: Samantha Z. Yammine, Christine Liu, Paige B. Jarreau, Imogen R. Coe

Editor’s note: "In her Working Life piece “Instagram won’t solve inequality” (16 March, p. 1294), Meghan Wright examined why she feels conflicted reading #scicomm Instagram posts by fellow women scientists. She explained that she recognizes the good they can do, yet it seems unfair that such scientists must devote time to social media outreach to combat systemic inequities. So, she has decided that she prefers to separate her social media use from her scientific activities. Wright named a social media role model at her university—the Science Sam Instagram account run by Samantha Yammine—before detailing why she did not want to participate in this kind of outreach. Although she intended to use Science Sam as an example of social media success, Wright’s critical comments about such outreach were interpreted by some as a sexist and mean-spirited personal attack on Samantha Yammine in particular and women science communicators in general. In this section, Samantha Yammine and colleagues describe the power of social media, the 500 Women Scientists organization responds to the Working Life article, and two scientists recognized by AAAS (the publisher of Science) for public engagement discuss how outreach and institutional reform can go hand in hand. In the Online Buzz box, we provide several excerpts from the online eletters we received."

How to be a real Male Champion of Change, external link

Source:  Australia's Science Channel Editors

Description: 

"Delivering positive change that puts an end to sexual harassment and gender inequality for good is going to require conscious and deliberate action by women and men, over and over again.

There are many great programs that are trying to address gender inequality in STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics & Medicine). Despite these, deep inequality persists.

Of course women must and will fight for change, but what can men do to support them? We suggest some simple guidelines:

1. Recognise male privilege

2. Challenge male privilege

3. Understand the obstacles women face

4. Develop a comprehensive approach

5. Change the system"

 

Men: when to stand up, when to pipe down, external link

Author: Tom Hartley

Description: "[...]When you see that other men are not listening to women’s experiences, are drowning out their contributions, dismissing their concerns or derailing discussions they have initiated, what should you do? You will need tact and judgement to determine whether your support is truly helpful – for example, if you get drawn into a predominantly male argument it is surprisingly be easy to become part of the problem, rather than the solution."

I Spent Two Years Trying to Fix the Gender Imbalance in My Stories, external link

Author: Ed Yong

Description: Author acknowledges the lack of gender balance when quoting scientists and describes the process he took to address this problem. 

Women scientists don't need fixing

Author: Amy Heffernan

Description: "The suggestion that women need ‘fixing’ via upskilling or behaviour modification to address workplace inequity fails to consider the workplace and social structures in which women exercise their choices. Here I debunk three of the most pervasive myths about women in STEM."

PDF file9th Gender Summit - Europe

Author: European Parliament and the Commission

Description: Report from the 2016 European Gender Summit to the European Commission and European Parliament. Research and Innovation Quality through Equality. Gender-based research, innovation and development for sustainable economies and societal well-being.

McKinsey Global Institute Report, external link

Authors: Sandrine Devillard, Tiffany Vogel, Andrew Pickersgill, Anu Madgavkar, Tracy Nowski, Mekala Krishnan, Tina Pan, and Dania Kechrid

Description: "Accelerating progress toward gender equality is not only a moral and social imperative, it would also deliver a growth dividend for Canada. In a new report from the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), The power of parity: Advancing women’s equality in Canada, we find that by taking steps to address this issue, Canada could add $150 billion in incremental GDP in 2026 or see a 0.6 percent increase of annual GDP growth."

Female CIHR grant applicants have lower success rates than male counterparts, external link

Author: Academica Group

Description: This article addresses the concerns about the potential effects of gender bias on science funding.

PDF fileThe chemistry PhD: the impact on women's retention

Author: Jessica Lober Newsome

Description: This research attempted to establish what accounts for the findings of a RSC survey of the career intentions of chemistry PhD students (RSC, 2008). It was a qualitative study which aimed to pin point the factors that discourage women more than men from planning a career in research, especially in academia.

PDF fileThrough Both Eyes: The Case for a Gender Lens in STEM

Authors: Dr. Anna Zecharia, Dr. Ellie Cosgrave, Professor Liz Thomas, and Dr. Rob Jones

Description: "SCIENCEGRRL is a new, grassroots movement springing from a collective feeling that something has to change about the representation of girls and women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) and in wider society. We launched our 2013 sciencegrrl calendar as a visual response to the EU Commission’s decision to advertise their ‘Science: it’s a girl thing’ campaign with a pseudo-pop video."

Making Chemistry Inclusive: Proceeding of the CSC Symposium on Equity and Diversity in Chemistry, external link

Authors: Nola Etkin, Margaret-Ann Armour, Tamara Franz-Odendaal, Geoff Rayner-Canham, Marelene Rayner-Canham, Hind A. Al-Abadleh, and Kirsten Jones

Description: "This book is drawn from talks presented at the Symposium on "Equity and Diversity in Chemistry" which was part of the 99th Canadian Society for Chemistry Conference in Halifax, Nova Scotia in June, 2016."

Accessible Science Laboratories, external link

Author: Council of Ontario Universities

Description: The paper’s recommendations are based on best practices and not all of the described provisions must be followed to comply with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). All suggestions, however, are directed toward building inclusive laboratory environments and supporting a culture of accessibility for all undergraduate and graduate students at our universities.

PDF fileGender in the Global Research Landscape: Elsevier Gender Report

Author: Elsevier

Description: "As a steward of world research, Elsevier has a responsibility to promote gender equality in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) and advance understanding of the impact of gender, sex, and diversity in research. In this regard, Elsevier fully supports the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal 5, “to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls,” and the Global Research Council’s Statement of Principles and Actions Promoting the Equality and Status of Women in Research.[…]"

Women and STEM: Bridging the Divide, external link

Authors: Beata Caranci, Katherine Judge, and Oriana Kobelak

Highlights: The labour market is increasingly demanding higher skill levels in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). And, the market is paying women above-average wages in these fields. It will be difficult to narrow the overall gender wage gap if women fail to make stronger inroads into STEM fields. Aptitude differentials in math among girls and boys as the source of women underrepresentation in STEM has been debunked many times over. The causes are numerous and complex, but include marginalization within educational and corporate institutions. Within the workplace, employers need to revisit whether ongoing marginalization is present. Women who acquire a degree in STEM are disproportionately slotted into lower paying technical roles.

Balancing the Scale: NSF's Career-Life Balance Initiative, external link

Author: National Science Foundation

Description: "The development of world-class STEM talent positions the U.S. for future global leadership in forging new and transformative discoveries, learning, and innovations, in a time when other nations increasingly are developing and retaining their own talent. However, although women and girls comprise a significant fraction of the STEM talent pool, recent studies (e.g., Staying Competitive, 2009) have demonstrated the adverse effect that lack of family friendly considerations have on women's progression to the top ranks of the scientific enterprise (especially academe). Family formation, notably marriage and childbirth, is a key factor for the departure from the STEM workforce between Ph.D. receipt and achieving tenure for women in the sciences. Needed progress can take place only through changes in the attitudes, policies, and practices that inform how we educate the workforce and manage in the workplace."

Championing the Success of Women in Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths, and Medicine, external link

Author: Digital Science

Description: "Digital Science is committed to improving connections, collaboration and communication within the academic community. We invest in companies with the aim of fostering change and providing long term benefits for the world of research. In order to ensure that the research community is fully connected and empowered, inclusivity is key, tapping into the expertise of everyone, regardless of gender, race or sexual orientation. In our commitment to improving science, we support those who previously have been marginalised, emphasising our common goals and stressing the importance of recognising the potential of individuals."

Women Matter: Ten years of insights on gender diversity, external link

Authors: Georges Desvaux, Sandrine Devillard, Alix de Zelicourt, Cecile Kossoff, Eric Labaye, and Sandra Sancier-Sultan

Description: McKinsey & Company report on gender equity. "A decade into our research, we highlight key findings—and invite 16 global leaders to look at how to increase gender diversity in corporations and imagine the inclusive company of the future."

PDF fileWomen's Participation in Patenting, external link

Author: Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada

Description: An analysis of patent cooperation treaty applications originating in Canada

Indigenous women and science knowledge: The first voice and climate change, external link

Author: Irene Fogarty

Description: "When we talk about science knowledge, we often neglect the contribution of indigenous peoples, particularly indigenous women. With nearly 200m indigenous women at the front line of climate change, their science knowledge is complementary, instructive and vital to scientific research in the ‘global North’. The ‘first voice’ of indigenous women is central to building ecological resilience and steering international action on climate change mitigation."

Society of Maori Astronomy Research and Traditions, external link

Description: "Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand who had extensive knowledge of the night sky. The movements of constellations, the heliacal rising of stars, the arrival of comets, the phases of the moon and many other astronomical phenomena were noted and examined by them. This detailed astronomical knowledge resulted in Māori having a precise understanding of the seasons and helped the ancestors of the Māori people to navigate across the vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean."

Lillian Dyck, external link

Source: Wikipedia

Description: "Lillian Eva Quan Dyck is a Canadian senator from Saskatchewan. Before being appointed to the Senate, she was a neuroscientist and Associate Dean at the University of Saskatchewan."

'Let our Indigenous voices be heard': Indigenous scientists join March for Science, external link

Author: Tim Fontaine

Description: This article talks about the over 1,500 Indigenous scientists and allies who voiced their support during the March for Science.

Learning the Land program combines Indigenous teachings with scientific knowledge, external link

Author: Samanda Brace

Description: "Learning the Land, [is] a program created by the Nature Conservancy of Canada and the Treaty 4 Education Alliance. It combines Indigenous culture and teachings with scientific knowledge about conservation."

Indigenous star lore: Night skies over Turtle Island, external link

Author: Hanna James

Description: "Frank Dempsy, an astronomy enthusiast and member of the Royal Astronomical Society, shared this Indigenous star story from the Pacific Northwest at the University of Toronto last week. He was joined by U of T's Hilding Neilson, an associate professor at Dunlap Institute for Astronomy & Astrophysics, and Karyn Recollet, an associate professor of women and gender studies, in a panel discussion called Night Skies Over Turtle Island: Indigenous Astronomy. The panel was moderated by Renée Hložek, an assistant professor of astrophysics at U of T's Faculty of Arts & Science and a TED senior fellow."

National Association of Māori Mathematicians, Scientists And Technologists (NAMMSAT), external link

Description: A collective group of Māori practitioners who supported the increased participation and achievement by Māori in the fields of mathematics, science, engineering and technology. NAMMSAT aimed to facilitate the participation and achievement of Māori in the educational and commercial sectors, and in Research, Science and Technology (RS&T).

Indigenous ecological knowledge, external link

Description: "Indigenous peoples have wide-ranging knowledge of the land and its ecology. Through collaboration with Indigenous partners, Parks Canada and Canadians are benefitting from traditional knowledge systems that have been handed down over many thousands of years."

Indigenous STEM Education Project, external link

Description: "With the support of the BHP Billiton Foundation, we’re implementing an important new education project aimed at increasing participation and achievement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). There are six program elements to the project, which caters to the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students as they progress through primary, secondary and tertiary education, and into employment."

Women in STEM Resources, external link

Author: Dr. Sarah Rugheimer

Description: "A repository of peer-reviewed research and resources discussing the challenges facing white women, and men and women of color in science. "

PDF fileUC Davis ADVANCE Blog Entries, external link

Author: Jonathan Eisen and Kim Shauman

Women in Science and Engineering: 12 Must-Read Bloggers, external link

Author: The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, Medicine

Description: "Women have long played an important role in scientific developments and discourse, however, this role has historically received relatively less recognition and coverage as compared to their male counterparts. Over the last few years, however, blogging has opened up a way for leading women in science to bring to light the important improvements women have made, the struggles they still encounter, and the strategies they set up for their work to be recognized."

Where’s the evidence? A little science about bias and gender equality, external link

Author: Curt Rice

Description: This posting lists some links to articles and blog posts on different published studies on gender equity and diversity matters.

10 Black Innovators in STEM to Recognize This Black History Month, external link

Author: Salesforce Blog

Description: This post recognizes the astounding feats of black visionaries who broke racial barriers and fought tirelessly for Equality.

Famous Canadian Scientists and Inventors of African Descent, external link

Author: Shamim in TECHNOVOX

Description: "In celebration of Black History Month, Alternavox is proud to present some notable personalities who made significant contributions to science and technology. Two of these three also became prominent Toronto citizens and were thoroughly engaged community activism."

Hilary Lappin-Scott – Disruptive STEMinist, external link

Author: Hilary Lappin-Scott

Description: "I’m Hilary Lappin-Scott, Professor of Microbiology. I’ve been working as a research scientist for decades, running my own research group and training lots of women and men as the next generation of scientists, industrialists and entrepreneurs. My postings cover my world of higher education, all STEM subjects, global conferences and travel, leadership in universities, equality and diversity. Comments welcome and all views my own."