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Dr. Richard Cheung

Richard Cheung
Professor
BASc, MASc, PhD, PEng
ENG-330
416-979-5000 ext. 6112

Areas of Academic Interest

Nuclear electricity generation and transmission

Power system protection and stability

Power electronics and drives

Substation security and communication

Energy eficiency and power quality

Power system operation and control

Power engineering software and cyber-security

Education

Year University Degree
1987 University of Toronto PhD
1984 University of Toronto MASc
1982 University of Toronto BASc

Courses Taught

Course Code Course
ELE 846 Power Systems Protection and Control
ELE 800 Design Project
EE 8405 Power System Stability and Control

Spotlight

Richard Cheung’s love for mathematics led him to power engineering, a subfield of electrical engineering that involves nuclear electricity design and power system protection and stability. Power engineering in particular, Cheung explains, heavily relies on mathematical analysis and modelling. “In power engineering, you can’t play around. The revenue a generator produces in one day is over one million dollars, so any delay involves a huge financial loss,” says Cheung. “We cannot afford to implement any model with uncertainty or errors. That’s why we need mathematics to help us get it right.”

Over his 35 year career in power engineering, Cheung has completed over 20 major industrial projects, built four special-purpose power converters for Ontario utilities and mining companies, and manufactured a solar energy converter. In addition to teaching, Cheung also works as a consultant for the power industry, including the Bruce Power, Pickering and Darlington Nuclear Generating Stations. And although he’s been teaching in the same area for over 30 years, Cheung says he’s continually finding new ways to improve his teaching methods and learning from his students. “I like when students ask me challenging questions,” says Cheung.

Richard Cheung

“In power engineering, we’re always finding new ways to improve safety and efficiency.”

  • T. Mander, R. Cheung, F. Nabhani, “Power system DNP3 data object security using data sets,” Journal of Computers and Security (Elsevier), COSE431, Vol.29, No.4, 2010.
  • H. Cheung, A. Hamlyn, L. Wang, C. Yang, R. Cheung, "Investigations of Impacts of Distributed Generations on Feeder Protections," 09GM1488, IEEE PES, Calgary, Canada, July 26-30, 2009.
  • H. Cheung, L. Wang, A. Hamlyn, R. Cheung, “Network-Assisted Corrective Actions against Short-Term and Long-Term Voltage Instability in Power System with DGs,” 08GM1590, IEEE PES, 2008.
  • C. Li, C. Yang, R. Cheung, "Key management for role hierarchy in distributed systems," Journal of Network and Computer Applications (Elsevier), Vol 30, No. 3, pp 920-936, Aug. 2007.
  • G. Allen, L. Wang, T. Mander, R. Cheung, “DSP-Based Adaptive High impedance Ground Fault Subtransmission Feeder Protection,” IEEE 1424405572, LES Conf. on Power Eng., Halifax, 2006.
  • Laboratory of Electric Drives and Application Research (LEDAR)