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Theme 4: Economics and policy

 Description

This project aims to assess ES pathways in terms of the ratio of energy input to output to calculate how much energy is required over a life cycle to store a unit of energy from a particular energy source. The ratio of energy input to energy output through a particular pathway is referred to as net energy ratio (NER). First, a life cycle assessment (LCA) framework of ES technologies specific to Canada will be developed and used to create LCA models for the various storage solutions. Then a comparative assessment of NER and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for ES technologies will be undertaken.

 Progress

The project team has developed a bottom-up data intensive life cycle assessment and net energy ratio model to assess the greenhouse gas emission and energy effectiveness of mechanical and thermal storage systems. Completed the work on life cycle assessment of mechanical and thermal storage systems. Research on techno-economic and life cycle assessment of battery storage system has started.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

3 journal papers, 1 journal paper submitted, and 1 invited talk.

 Project leader

Amit Kumar, University of Alberta

Project collaborators

  • Bala Venkatesh, Ryerson University
  • Rajesh Karki, University of Saskatchewan

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Abayomi Oni (MASc)
  • Mustafizur Rahman (PhD)
  • Tien Viet Tran (MASc)

 Description

This project aims to build technoeconomic models for estimating the price impacts of the large-scale integration of ES in competitive electricity markets.

 Progress

The project team has completed a literature review of batteries for grid-scale application and building of a database for the available real life market data from two electricity markets in Canada and one from a New York state market. Collaborations began with Hamid Zareipour, University of Calgary.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

7 journal papers, 2 journal paper submitted, 2 panels, and 3 tutorials/lectures.

Project leader

Miguel Anjos, École Polytechnique de Montréal

 Project collaborators

  • Hamid Zareipour, University of Calgary
  • Kankar Bhattacharya, University of Waterloo

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Juan Arteaga (PhD)
  • Nima Sarajpoor (PhD)
  • Valérie Provost (MASc)
  • Marie Pied (MASc)

 Description

This project will examine the role of ES solutions as ancillary service providers and their integration with the grid system. Research will be undertaken to determine cost structures and appropriate pricing mechanisms for these services.

 Progress

Work is underway on several fronts: 1) development of a comprehensive energy management system (EMS) including pumped storage hydro to examine its participation in frequency regulation services; 2) development of a joint auction model for demand response (DR) for energy and spinning reserve provisions.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

3 journal papers, 1 journal paper submitted, 4 conference papers, and 1 book chapter.

 Project leader

Kankar Bhattacharya, University of Waterloo

 Project collaborators

  • Steven Wong, CanmetENERGY
  • Miguel Anjos, École Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Hamid Zareipour, University of Calgary
  • Mark Winfield, York University

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Hisham Alharbi (PhD)
  • Nitin Padmanabhan (PhD)
  • Dario Peralta (PhD)
  • Omar Alrumayh (PhD)
  • Talal Alharbi (PhD)

 Description

The objective is to investigate different brokerage models for integrating ES into power systems, and to test the applicability and potential impact of such models using real-world data from Canadian settings.

 Progress

So far, an exact method that addresses three challenges for integrating distributed ES – coordination, scalability and heterogeneity – has been designed. A study was carried out on how the presence of a storage operator in an energy market could stabilize the price of energy during peak demand periods and help avoid blackouts.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

2 journal papers, 5 journal papers submitted, 1 conference paper, and 1 patent declared.

 Project leader

Miguel Anjos, École Polytechnique de Montréal

 Project collaborators

  • Gilles Savard, École Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Michel Gendreau, École Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Bala Venkatesh, Ryerson University

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Mariana Rocha (PhD)
  • Mathieu Tanneau (PhD)
  • Martim Joyce-Moniz (Postdoctoral Fellow)
  • Mathieu Besançon (PhD)
  • Ilaria Salerno (MASc)
  • Elizaveta Kuznetsova (Postdoctoral Fellow)
  • Louis-Philippe Proulx (MASc)

 Description

1) Assess existing legislative and policy frameworks at the federal and provincial levels as they relate to the development and use of ES technologies, particularly in support of the large-scale integration of low impact but intermittent renewables, such as wind and solar energy. 2) Make policy framework recommendations at the federal and provincial levels to advance the further development and deployment of ES technologies in an environmentally and economically sustainable manner for the purpose of facilitating the large-scale integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies.

 Progress

The project team completed development of a template for the comparative analysis of public policies related to ES in multiple jurisdictions. They organized and presented three panels (Community Energy Planning, the Future of Energy Systems, and Ontario’s Long-Term Electricity Plan) focused on ES policy issues at the Ontario Climate Change Consortium Symposium May 12, 2017. A policy scan for Canada, U.S. and the EU was completed with 3 working papers published. Policy overview paper was published in Energy Policy. A second closely related paper has been published in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, and a book chapter on the Ontario electricity policy, including developments related to energy storage, is in press. Created the NEST Section of the SEI website and are collaborating closely with project 4.6 and an SSHRC Funded Partnership Development Project on community energy planning. Have presented or organized 7 workshops/seminars/webinars on topics related to energy storage policy.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

2 journal papers, 3 journal papers prepped, 1 book chapter, 9 workshops, 1 workshop proposal, 4 op-eds, and multiple blog entries, external link, opens in new window.

 Project leader

Mark Winfield, York University

 Project collaborators

  • Ian Rowlands, University of Waterloo
  • Amit Kumar, University of Alberta
  • Rajesh Karki, University of Saskatchewan

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Shahab Shokrzadeh (Postdoctoral fellow)
  • Adlar Gross (MES)
  • Scott Harbinson (CEKAP Funded)  (MES)
  • Susan Wyse (CEKAP Funded) (MES)
  • Cristian Hurtado (MES)
  • Nathan Lev (MES/JD)

 Description

The main objective of this project is to explain why some ES technologies have been, and will continue to be, in turn, “supported,” “accepted” or “rejected” by communities.

 Progress

The project team has continued its work investigating various aspects related to social acceptance of energy storage technologies. Building upon the foundational work in concepts, theories, literature reviews and general approaches (to, for instance, public engagement), more recent work has focused upon particular case-studies with detailed primary research.  Results are being published on the project website (working papers and blogs, external link, opens in new window) and in international journals. 

 Outcomes (cumulative)

5 journal papers, 3 working papers, 7 blog entries, and 1 database,  1 Canadian Energy Storage Activity Database, external link.

 Project leader

Ian Rowlands, University of Waterloo

 Project collaborators

  • Mark Winfield, York University
  • Bala Venkatesh, Ryerson University
  • Miguel Anjos, École Polytechnique de Montréal

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • James Gaede (Postdoctoral fellow)
  • Dane Labonte (PhD)
  • Danielle Lavergne-Giroux (MES)  
  • Sara Ganowski (MES)
  • Ines Havet (PhD)