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Theme 1: Energy storage technologies

 Description

This project aims to develop a novel and custom-designed BTMS solution for thermal management of large-scale battery systems for grid applications that can maintain the temperature of the batteries within the recommended range under various loads and climate conditions. The BTMS should be compact, cost-effective, and reliable with minimal maintenance and packaging requirements. It must also promise low parasitic power requirements and be able to operate under variable climatic conditions.

 Progress 

Graphite heatsinks and heat spreaders have been designed and tested. Simulation results were validated using experimental results. The project team has studied heat performance of the battery, and designed, optimized and tested a cooling system at the cell level. Conducted EV life cycle analysis.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

8 journal papers, 2 journal papers submitted, 19 conference papers, 6 invited talks, 2 invited keynotes, 1 news article, 1 exhibition, and 1 radio interview.

 Project leader

Majid Bahrami, Simon Fraser University

 Project collaborators

  • F. Handan Tezel, University of Ottawa
  • Liuchen Chang, University of New Brunswick

Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Claire McCague (Postdoctoral fellow) – participating, not funded
  • Martin Cermak (PhD)
  • Mina Rouhani (PhD)
  • Anil Stephen (PhD)
  • Hesam Bahrehmand (PhD)
  • Ali Rahnama (PhD)
  • Sepehr Foroushani (Postdoctoral fellow)

 Description

This project aims to develop mathematical models of flywheel systems considering energy losses, discrete design variables, rotor dynamic effects and novel material systems. A flywheel system with an energy capacity of 0.25 kWh will be fabricated, characterized and tested to validate and optimize models.

Progress

A flywheel testing enclosure has been constructed. Development of a composite flywheel system for 0.25 kWh has commenced. A flywheel numerical model and a comparative analysis of composite and metal flywheels were developed. Fabrication and testing of composite flywheel demonstrator are completed.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

4 journal papers and 3 conference papers.

Project leader

Marc Secanell Gallart, University of Alberta

Project collaborators

  • Pierre Mertiny, University of Alberta
  • Liuchen Chang, University of New Brunswick
  • Magdy Salama, University of Waterloo

Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Vaishnavi Kale (MASc)
  • Danica Sun (MASc)

 Description

Operational and market conditions for the world’s first grid connected underwater energy storage facility will be studied in detail.  A transient, advanced exergy approach will be applied to assess facility production efficiency.  The commercial aspects of operation will then be co-optimized with production based on mutually advantageous opportunities revealed through thermodynamic and market analysis.

 Progress

The project is completed.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

4 journal paper, 2 journal papers submitted, 3 conference papers, co-chaired 2 workshops.

 Project leader

Rupp Carriveau, University of Windsor

 Project collaborators

  • David Ting, University of Windsor
  • Lindsay Miller, University of Windsor
  • Scott Harper, Wind Energy Institute of Canada
  • Seamus Garvey, University of Nottingham
  • Tonio Sant, University of Malta
  • Andrew McGillis, Hydrostor
  • F. Handan Tezel, University of Ottawa
  • Mark Winfield, York University
  • Ian Rowlands, University of Waterloo

 Highly qualified personnel (year 3)

  • Maziar Mosavati (PhD)
  • Sara Alhasan (MASc)
  • Mehdi Ebrahimi (PDF)
  • Zhiwen Wang, Dalian Maritime University (PhD)

 Description

In this project, promising new adsorbent materials will be examined, modelled and optimized to increase energy density (by four to five times greater than current materials) in order to improve the economic viability of adsorption-based systems for space heating and cooling applications.

 Progress

Experimental set-up was upgraded with a system control program to control the system and record data.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

5 journal papers, 9 conference papers, 3 invited talks, 3 invited keynotes, 1 parliamentary presentation, and 1 radio interview.

 Project leader

F. Handan Tezel, University of Ottawa

Project collaborators

  • Tariq Iqbal, Memorial University
  • Miguel Anjos, École Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Majid Bahrami, Simon Fraser University

Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Ye Hua (Postdoctoral fellow)
  • Curtis Strong (MASc)
  • Tien Viet Tran (MASc)
  • Rasha Rabbani (MaSc)
  • Md. Habibur Rahman (MASc)
  • Eniayo Ayola (Undergraduate)
  • Emma Harrison (Undergraduate)

 Description

This research aims to develop hybrid ES systems, where several types and sizes of ES systems are combined to provide a composite storage solution. The first objective is to develop an optimization solution that provides the optimal hybrid design of an ES system that combines two or more storage elements to provide certain performance metrics and features at the lowest cost, and with the longest life and highest reliability. The second objective of this research is to develop scheduling methods for the developed hybrid systems to deliver the required services, while maximizing asset life.

 Progress

Analysis of various ES elements to determine their dynamic characteristics and development of mathematical models for the optimal design of the hybrid ES system have been completed.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

8 journal papers, 4 journal papers submitted, 3 disclosures initiated, 1 conference, and 1 plenary.

 Project leader

Bala Venkatesh, Ryerson University

 Project collaborators

  • Bin Wu, Ryerson University
  • Reza Iravani, University of Toronto

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Ayman Elkasrawy (PhD)
  • Mohammadreza Vatani (PhD)
  • Bárbara Rosado (Visiting Scientist)

 Description

Development and testing (both in the laboratory and in the partnering utility) of an ES solution that can be mounted on the utility pole, adjacent to poletop transformers. The pole-top ES solution is housed in a cabinet containing the power converter and with lithiumion batteries.

 Progress

  The two-year project has been completed. Results show acceptable performance of the unit for load curve smoothing and peak shaving of the distribution transformer. Installation of the unit on a Toronto Hydro utility pole was completed in August 2016 and successfully field tested until February 2017.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

4 journal papers, 1 conference paper, 2 patents, 1 video.

 Project leader

Bala Venkatesh, Ryerson University

 Project collaborators

  • Bin Wu, Ryerson University
  • David Xu, Ryerson University
  • Majid Bahrami, Simon Fraser University

 Highly qualified personnel (year 3)

N/A