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Sean Hingston

Dr. Sean Hingston

Assistant Professor
DepartmentMarketing Management
EducationPhD
OfficeTBD
Phone416-979-5000, ext: TBD

Overview

Dr. Sean Hingston is an assistant professor of marketing. He earned his MSc in Marketing, Management, and Society from the Stockholm University School of Business, and his PhD in Marketing from the Schulich School of Business at York University. Dr. Hingston has two dominant lines of research, the first of which focuses on the role that social judgments play in consumption. In this work, he investigates how consumers are judged for their consumption behaviours, and also how the inferences people make about others can come to influence their judgments of brands and products. His other line of research explores the psychological basis of food preferences and aversions. Prior to academia, Dr. Hingston worked in a number of sales, marketing, and research roles at organizations such as Molson Coors and the Ontario Public Service.

Food preferences, social judgments, psychological essentialism, categorization, contagion.

Publications in Refereed Journals
Whelan, J., Hingston, S. T., & Thomson, M. (2019). Does growing up rich and insecure make objects seem more human? Childhood material and social environments interact to predict anthropomorphism. Personality and Individual Differences, external link, opens in new window, 137, 86-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2018.08.015
Hingston, S. T., & Noseworthy, T. J. (2018). Why Consumers Don't see the Benefits of Genetically Modified Foods, and what Marketers can do about It, external link, opens in new window. Journal of Marketing, 82(5), 125-140. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1509/jm.17.0100
Whelan, J., & T. Hingston, S. (2018). Can everyday brands be threatening? Responses to brand primes depend on childhood socioeconomic status, external link, opens in new window. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 28(3), 477-486. https://doi.org/10.1002/jcpy.1029
Hingston, S. T., McManus, J. F., & Noseworthy, T. J. (2017). How inferred contagion biases dispositional judgments of others, external link, opens in new window. Journal of Consumer Psychology, 27(2), 195-206. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcps.2016.09.005
Course code Course title
MKT 400 Understanding Consumers and the new media
Previously taught
Introductory Marketing
Marketing Research
Year Research funding
2019 SSHRC Explore
2019 DANCAP Faculty Research Fund
2017 Ontario Graduate Scholarship
2015-2017 SSHRC Doctoral Fellowship
2014 Ontario Graduate Scholarship
Year Honour / Award
2020 Honourable Mention, Best Paper in Marketing, Administrative Sciences Association of Canada conference
2018 Nominated for Dissertation Award, York University
2017 Winner, Best Paper in Marketing, Administrative Sciences Association of Canada conference
2015 AMA Sheth Doctoral Consortium Fellow
2014 Winner, Best Paper in Marketing, Administrative Sciences Association of Canada conference