LABORATORY OF

Fields, Flows, and Interfaces

Labratory of Fields, Flows, and Interfaces Header Graphic
Principal Investigator

Scott S. H. Tsai

Ryerson University

Department of Mechanical
and Industrial Engineering


People

Scott S. H. Tsai

Scott S. H. Tsai

Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering
scott.tsai@ryerson.ca

Education
PhD (eng. sci.), Harvard University, 2012
SM (eng. sci.), Harvard University, 2009
BASc (mech. eng.), University of Toronto, 2007

Scott's research has involved a combination of low Reynolds number fluid mechanics and electrodynamics. More specifically, Scott has developed systems that manipulate magnetic microparticles in microfluidic channels, for applications in particle sorting and coating, and in measuring ultralow interfacial tensions. At Ryerson University, he is studying the mechanics of fields, flows, and interfaces, to develop technologies for applications in biomedicine.


Huma Inayat

Huma Inayat

PhD Student
Biomedical Engineering
(Co-supervised with Andras Kapus)
inayathu@ryerson.ca

Education
BSc (biotech., chem.), University of Toronto, 2014

Huma is building a lab-on-a-chip platform for investigating and quantifying the biology behind epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. The goal is to understand how normal epithelial cells transform into matrix-producing, invasive, and contractile myofibroblasts.


Morteza Jeyhani

Morteza Jeyhani

PhD Student
Mechanical Engineering
(Co-supervised with
Dae Kun Hwang)
mjeyhani@ryerson.ca

Education
MASc (mech. eng.), Concordia University, 2014
BEng (mech. eng.), Azad University, 2011

Morteza is developing microfluidic approaches to manipulate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) droplets, and their biomedical applications. Previously Morteza had worked on experiments that studied left ventricular flow patterns after mitral valve repair.


Maryam Navi

Maryam Navi

PhD Student
Biomedical Engineering
maryam.navi@ryerson.ca

Education
BSc (civil eng.), Semnan University, 2014

Maryam's research is focused on non-invasive particle manipulation with optical tweezers in microfluidics. Her goal is to combine microfluidics and optical tweezers, for applications in trapping, sorting, and coating of cells. Prior to joining LoFFI, she was working on the manipulation of biofluids with AC electrothermal micropumps.


Ali Paknahad

Ali Paknahad

PhD Student
Mechanical Engineering
(Co-supervised with Michael Kolios)
ali.paknahad@ryerson.ca

Education
MSc (MEMS), University of Tehran, 2017
BSc (elec. eng.), Shamsipour Technical and Vocational College, 2015

Ali has worked on MEMS-based electromagnetic micro pumps for microfluidics applications. His research interests in LoFFI include microfluidics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and Bio-MEMS.


Ali Salari

Ali Salari

PhD Student
Biomedical Engineering
(Co-supervised with Michael Kolios)
a1salari@ryerson.ca

Education
MSc (elec. eng.), University of Calgary, 2015
MSc (mech. eng.), Sharif University of Technology, 2011
BSc (mech. eng.), Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, 2008

Ali's research at LoFFI is focused on experimental and theoretical studies of ultrasound and microbubble interactions in a microfluidic platform for therapeutic and diagnostic applications.


Intesar Zalloum

Intesar Zalloum

PhD Student
Medical Physics
(Co-supervised with
Raffi Karshafian)
izalloum@ryerson.ca

Education
MSc (particle phys.), Queen Mary University of London, 2015
BSc (physics), Palestine Polytechnic University, 2013

Intesar’s research at LoFFI is focused on experimental studies of monodisperse microbubbles. More specifically, Intesar will focus on investigating the relationship between ultrasound pulse parameters on the cavitation properties of monodisperse lipid-shelled microbubbles. In addition, she will study the contrast enhancement of ultrasound images with monodisperse bubbles compared to commercially-available polydisperse bubbles. Finally, she will explore the enhancement in therapeutic-efficacy of monodisperse bubbles in cellular uptake compared to polydisperse bubbles.


Jennifer Kieda

Jennifer Kieda

MASc Student
Biomedical Engineering
jennifer.kieda@ryerson.ca

Education
BEng (biomed. eng.), Ryerson University, 2018

Jennifer is developing microfluidic approaches to generate multi-component double-emulsion water-in-water-in-water droplets, for application as models for cellular phase separation.


Katherine Chan

Katherine Chan

MASc Student
Biomedical Engineering
katherine.chan@ryerson.ca

Education
BEng (biomed. eng.), Ryerson University

Katherine is focused on developing microfluidic models that recapitulate the triggers for liquid-liquid phase separation in cells.


Liam Kerr

Liam Kerr

BEng Student
Mechanical Engineering
liam.kerr@ryerson.ca

Education
4th Year BEng (mech. eng.), Ryerson University

Liam is working to initiate controlled peptide self-assembly by hydrodynamic flow-focusing and localized electric fields applied along microfluidic channels. He will explore the applications of peptide self-assembly to drug encapsulation, controlled release, and cancer therapy.


Group photos

2019

Outside of The Rec Room.Outside of The Rec Room in summer 2019.

2018

Group lunch from summer 2018.Group lunch from summer 2018.

2017

Team lunch in the summer of 2017.Team lunch in the summer of 2017.

2016

LoFFI at OOAC 2016.Attending Ontario on a Chip in May 2016.

2015

Picnic at Centre Island.Picnic at Centre Island, in May 2015.

2014

LoFFI at OOAC 2014Ontario on a Chip symposium in May 2014.

2013

LoFFI at Centre IslandPicnic at Centre Island in August 2013.