You are now in the main content area

Communication and Culture (MA, PhD) - joint program with York University

Overview

This unique partnership between two universities combines expertise and opportunities for advanced study of media and cultural technologies, as well as communication politics in practice and theory. The two-year, full- or part-time MA program combines academic and professional work through independent research in theory-building, media practice or policy implications. The full-time PhD program provides a thorough grounding in theory and method, and the practices, processes and technologies of contemporary, media-immersed cultures.

Degrees awarded: MA, PhD

Administered by: Yeates School of Graduate Studies, Ryerson University and Faculty of Graduate Studies, York University, external link

Communication and Culture graduate program website

Curriculum

Degree requirements

Course code Course name Credits

CC8902

Research Methodologies

1

CC8905

MA Research Specialization and Practice

1

CC8906

Communication and Culture: An Interdisciplinary Approach

1

Course name Credits
Five credits from Group I, II or III: Specialization Electives (at least one from each of the groups) 5

And one of the following options:

Research Paper option
Course name Credits
Master's Research Paper Milestone
One additional credit from Group I, II or III 1
Thesis option
Course name Credits
Master's Thesis Milestone
Project option
Course name Credits
Master's Project Milestone
Electives
Group I: Specialization Electives in Media and Culture
Course code Course name Credits

CC8210

Genders, Sexualities and Screens

1

CC8211

History of Things

1

CC8212

Post Secular Cinema

1

CC8213

Space and Cinema

1

CC8819

Cultures of Museums, Archives

1

CC8822

Performing Arts and the City

1

CC8823

Transnat Id, New Mediations

1

CC8824

Globlzn: Mkts, Citizen, Identity

1

CC8825

Seminar Social Cultural Theory

1

CC8826

Post-Human Cndn: Theory, Polit

1

CC8827

City as Cinema

1

CC8828

Philosophy, Culture and Values

1

CC8829

Modernist Lit Circ: Cult'l Appr

1

CC8830

Writing the Self, Reading the Life

1

CC8831

Theorizing the Sacred

1

CC8833

Cultures of Sexuality, Gender

1

CC8834

Images of Animals

1

CC8835

Global Cultural Flows After 9/11

1

CC8836

Topics in Media and Culture

1

CC8837

Asian Studies Perspectives

1

CC8838

Postcoloniality

1

CC8839

Sound Studies

1

CC8920

Theoretical Appch Media & Cult

1

CC8921

Visual Culture

1

CC8922

Issues in Cultural Studies

1

CC8923

Culture as Perf: Anthr of  Arts

1

CC8924

Marxism Culture and Film

1

CC8925

Reading Television

1

CC8926

Theoretical Issues in Film

1

CC8927

Reading Film

1

CC8928

Culture and the Environment

1

CC8929

Seminar: Symbolic Anthropology

1

CC8930

Cult & Values - Pop Media

1

CC8931

Popular Music Studies

1

CC8932

Commun Culture and the City

1

CC8933

Culture in the City Workshop

1

CC8934

Contemp Topics: Social Theory

1

CC8935

Critique of Everyday Culture

1

CC8936

Cultural Condit of Authorship

1

CC8938

Spec Top in Media Culture B

1

CC8939

Special Topics in Media Culture A

1

CC8020

Social Theory and Comm Process

2

CC8021

Film and Social Change

2

CC8022

Mediations of Identity

2

CC8023

Contmp Topics: Social Theory

2

CC8024

The Critique of Everyday Culture

2

CC8025

Summer Seminar in Social, Cultural Theory

2

Group II: Specialization Electives in Politics and Policy
Course code Course name Credits

CC8310

World Politics

1

CC8702 Labour in Comm and Culture 1
CC8840 Media Democracy 1

CC8841

Owning Culture

1

CC8842

Public Affairs Media

1

CC8843

Culture Cntrpublic and The WTO

1

CC8844

Managing in Broadcast, Digital Worlds

1

CC8845

Commun and International Devel

1

CC8846

Communication and Public Interest

1

CC8847

Global Media

1

CC8848

Armed Conflict, Peace & the Media

1

CC8849

Topics in Politics and Policy

1

CC8850

Politics of Aesthetics

1

CC8940

Poltc Econ of Cult and Commun

1

CC8941

Issues in Commun & Cult Policy

1

CC8942

Cross-Cult & Internat Commun

1

CC8943

Globalization of Comm & Cult

1

CC8944

Technology and Globalization

1

CC8946

Communication Policy

1

CC8947

Cultural Policy

1

CC8948

The Image Industry

1

CC8949

The Communications Industry

1

CC8950

Current Issues: Telecommun

1

CC8951

Communications Law

1

CC8952

Political Economy of Media

1

CC8953

Politics of Intellec Property

1

CC8954

New Social Movements

1

CC8956

Globlzn & Cultural Identity

1

CC8958

Readings in Public Policy

1

CC8959

Spec Topics: Politics & Policy

1

CC8051

Readings in Public Policy

2

Group III: Specialization Electives in Technology in Practice
Course code Course name Credits

CC8401

Accelerating Technicity

1

CC8703 Tech Mediations in Visual Culture 1
CC8832 Communication and the Sociotech 1

CC8860

Digital Games and Learning

1

CC8861

Bodies in Technology

1

CC8862

Future Cinema II

1

CC8863

Media History

1

CC8960

Adv Communication Technology

1

CC8961

Issues in Media Production

1

CC8962

Lang & Narrative Film/Video/Mm

1

CC8963

Social Cult Impl of New Media

1

CC8964

Diffusion of Commun Technol

1

CC8965

Communication in Organizations

1

CC8966

Activist Video Making

1

CC8967

Contemp Theory in Visual Arts

1

CC8968

History & Theory of Film & Video

1

CC8969

Media Ethics

1

CC8970

Special Topics in Cdn Cinema

1

CC8971

Experimental Media

1

CC8972

Experimental Film Processes

1

CC8973

Design: Interactive Multimedia

1

CC8974

Cultural Production Workshop

1

CC8975

Race & Gender in Digital Tech

1

CC8976

Digital & Interact Entertainmt

1

CC8977

Media Prod Techniques & Pract

1

CC8978

Documentary Narration

1

CC8979

Spec Topics:Technology & Commun

1

CC8980

Adv Media Production Project

1

CC8981

Internet Creativity &  Innov

1

CC8982

The Body and the Culture of Modernity

1

CC8983

The Culture of the Avant-garde

1

CC8984

A History of News

1

CC8985

Photographic Vision/Practice

1

CC8986

Future Cinema I

1

CC8987

Selected Topics, Tech in Pract

1

CC8988

Design and Research Theory

1

CC8989

Design Issues, Critical Making

1

CC8060

Cultural Production Workshop

2

CC8061

Wired World: Cult Tech Phil

2

The following courses may be used by Master's students in place of any Specialization course, with the permission of the Program Director
Course code Course name Credits

CC8990

Directed Rdg: Commun & Cult A

1

CC8991

Directed Rsrch: Commun & Cult

1

CC8992

Directed Grp Stud: Comm & Cult

1

CC8993

Field Placements

1

CC8994

Directed Rdg: Commun & Cult B

1

CC8093

Field Placements

2

Degree requirements

Course name Credits
Comprehensive Examination Milestone
PhD Dissertation Research Milestone
Three credits from Group I, II or III: Specialization Electives 3
Course code Course name Credits

CC9900

Advanced Research Methodologies

1

CC9904

Perspectives: Comm and Culture

1

CC9906

PhD Field Seminar:  Disciplinary Practice

1

Electives
Group I: Specialization Electives in Media and Culture
Course code Course name Credits

CC8210

Genders, Sexualities and Screens

1

CC8211

History of Things

1

CC8212

Post Secular Cinema

1

CC8213

Space and Cinema

1

CC8819

Cultures of Museums, Archives

1

CC8822

Performing Arts and the City

1

CC8823

Transnat Id, New Mediations

1

CC8824

Globlzn: Mkts, Citizen, Identity

1

CC8825

Seminar Social Cultural Theory

1

CC8826

Post-Human Cndn: Theory, Polit

1

CC8827

City as Cinema

1

CC8828

Philosophy, Culture and Values

1

CC8829

Modernist Lit Circ: Cult'l Appr

1

CC8830

Writing the Self, Reading the Life

1

CC8831

Theorizing the Sacred

1

CC8833

Cultures of Sexuality, Gender

1

CC8834

Images of Animals

1

CC8835

Global Cultural Flows After 9/11

1

CC8836

Topics in Media and Culture

1

CC8837

Asian Studies Perspectives

1

CC8838

Postcoloniality

1

CC8839

Sound Studies

1

CC8920

Theoretical Appch Media & Cult

1

CC8921

Visual Culture

1

CC8922

Issues in Cultural Studies

1

CC8923

Culture as Perf: Anthr of  Arts

1

CC8924

Marxism Culture and Film

1

CC8925

Reading Television

1

CC8926

Theoretical Issues in Film

1

CC8927

Reading Film

1

CC8928

Culture and the Environment

1

CC8929

Seminar: Symbolic Anthropology

1

CC8930

Cult & Values - Pop Media

1

CC8931

Popular Music Studies

1

CC8932

Commun Culture and the City

1

CC8933

Culture in the City Workshop

1

CC8934

Contemp Topics: Social Theory

1

CC8935

Critique of Everyday Culture

1

CC8936

Cultural Condit of Authorship

1

CC8938

Spec Top in Media Culture B

1

CC8939

Special Topics in Media Culture A

1

CC8020

Social Theory and Comm Process

2

CC8021

Film and Social Change

2

CC8022

Mediations of Identity

2

CC8023

Contmp Topics: Social Theory

2

CC8024

The Critique of Everyday Culture

2

CC8025

Summer Seminar in Social, Cultural Theory

2

CC9920

Topics in Psychoanl and Culture

1

Group II: Specialization Electives in Politics and Policy
Course code Course name Credits

CC8310

World Politics

1

CC8702 Labour in Comm and Culture 1
CC8840 Media Democracy 1

CC8841

Owning Culture

1

CC8842

Public Affairs Media

1

CC8843

Culture Cntrpublic and The WTO

1

CC8844

Managing in Broadcast, Digital Worlds

1

CC8845

Commun and International Devel

1

CC8846

Communication and Public Interest

1

CC8847

Global Media

1

CC8848

Armed Conflict, Peace & the Media

1

CC8849

Topics in Politics and Policy

1

CC8850

Politics of Aesthetics

1

CC8940

Poltc Econ of Cult and Commun

1

CC8941

Issues in Commun & Cult Policy

1

CC8942

Cross-Cult & Internat Commun

1

CC8943

Globalization of Comm & Cult

1

CC8944

Technology and Globalization

1

CC8946

Communication Policy

1

CC8947

Cultural Policy

1

CC8948

The Image Industry

1

CC8949

The Communications Industry

1

CC8950

Current Issues: Telecommun

1

CC8951

Communications Law

1

CC8952

Political Economy of Media

1

CC8953

Politics of Intellec Property

1

CC8954

New Social Movements

1

CC8956

Globlzn & Cultural Identity

1

CC8958

Readings in Public Policy

1

CC8959

Spec Topics: Politics & Policy

1

CC8051

Readings in Public Policy

2

Group III: Specialization Electives in Technology in Practice 
Course code Course name Credits

CC8401

Accelerating Technicity

1

CC8703 Tech Mediations in Visual Culture 1
CC8832 Communication and the Sociotech 1

CC8860

Digital Games and Learning

1

CC8861

Bodies in Technology

1

CC8862

Future Cinema II

1

CC8863

Media History

1

CC8960

Adv Communication Technology

1

CC8961

Issues in Media Production

1

CC8962

Lang & Narrative Film/Video/Mm

1

CC8963

Social Cult Impl of New Media

1

CC8964

Diffusion of Commun Technol

1

CC8965

Communication in Organizations

1

CC8966

Activist Video Making

1

CC8967

Contemp Theory in Visual Arts

1

CC8968

History & Theory of Film & Video

1

CC8969

Media Ethics

1

CC8970

Special Topics in Cdn Cinema

1

CC8971

Experimental Media

1

CC8972

Experimental Film Processes

1

CC8973

Design: Interactive Multimedia

1

CC8974

Cultural Production Workshop

1

CC8975

Race & Gender in Digital Tech

1

CC8976

Digital & Interact Entertainmt

1

CC8977

Media Prod Techniques & Pract

1

CC8978

Documentary Narration

1

CC8979

Spec Topics:Technology & Commun

1

CC8980

Adv Media Production Project

1

CC8981

Internet Creativity &  Innov

1

CC8982

The Body and the Culture of Modernity

1

CC8983

The Culture of the Avant-garde

1

CC8984

A History of News

1

CC8985

Photographic Vision/Practice

1

CC8986

Future Cinema I

1

CC8987

Selected Topics, Tech in Pract

1

CC8988

Design and Research Theory

1

CC8989

Design Issues, Critical Making

1

CC8060

Cultural Production Workshop

2

CC8061

Wired World: Cult Tech Phil

2

CC9921

Technology Commun & Culture

1

CC9922

Cinema and Media Key Concepts

1

The following courses may be used by Doctoral candidates in place of any Specialization course, with the permission of the Program Director
Course code Course name Credits

CC9990

Directed Readings A

1

CC9991

Directed Readings B

1

CC9992

Directed Research

1

CC9993

Directed Group Study

1

All “CC” courses have York University course numbers indicated in brackets following the Ryerson University codes.

Master's Research Paper

This is a “Milestone.”  Pass/Fail

Master's Thesis

This is a “Milestone.”  Pass/Fail 

Master's Project

This is a “Milestone.”  Pass/Fail 

Comprehensive Examination

This is a “Milestone.”  Pass/Fail

PhD Dissertation Research

Pre-requisite: Comprehensive Examination.  This is a “Milestone.”  Pass/Fail

CC8020 (CMCT 6103 6.0)  Social Theory and Communication Processes

Theories of communication processes, the mass media, and symbolic behaviour. The mass media and the controversies about popular culture; criteria for evaluating the media; research methodology; and content analysis. Antirequisite SPT 6032 6.0 (York University), SOCI 6560 6.0 (York University).  2 Credits

CC8021 (CMCT 5102 6.0)  Film and Social Change

This course investigates the ways in which films of all kinds can be used as a means to radical insights into culture, giving consider­ation to the contributions to film criticism and theory offered by various radical movements such as Marxism, Feminism, and Gay Liberation.  Antirequisite FILM 4410 6.0 (Atkinson).  2 Credits

CC8022 (CMCT 5103 6.0)  Mediations of Identity

This course is premised upon the principle that the mass media undertake the function of moral, political and ideological reproduction within society. In this respect, the course examines the ways in which media's representations of social identity (e.g. race, sexuality, gender, class, nation), act as highly selective and ideologically shaped portrayals of the social order. We shall closely consider current and 'classical' theories which allow particular insight into social construction of human identities, subjects and subjectivities. These theoretical frames of reference will also be applied in the analysis of various media forms and genres (including photography, television and film).  Antirequisite AS/SOSC 4325 6.0 (York University). 2 Credits

CC8023 (CMCT6113 6.0)  Contemporary Topics in Social Theory

The purpose of this course is to take up issues that are topical and require some knowledge of social, political, philosophical and psychoanalytic theory.  Antirequisite SOCI 6220 6.0 (York University), PHIL 6640 6.0 (York University). 2 Credits

CC8024 (CMCT6121 6.0)  The Critique of Everyday Culture

An attempt to integrate various theoretical frameworks centering on the twin problematics of everyday life and the study of popular culture.  In particular, it examines anthropological, phenomenological, semiological, hermeneutical and neo-Marxist approaches to culture. Antirequisite SOCI 6130 6.0 (York University) & SPT 6609 6.0 (York University).   2 Credits

CC8025 (CMCT 6130 6.0)  Summer Seminar in Social, Cultural Theory

This seminar examines key aspects of contemporary social and cultural theory, focusing on the writings of an important theorist in the field.  Normally, that theorist will participate in the course for one week, offering a series of seminars on her/his work.  2 Credits

CC8051 (CMCT6313 6.0)  Readings in Public Policy

Exploration of key ideas about public policy processes with an emphasis on how this process is played out in the various policy areas of interest to students in the course.  Antirequisite ENVS 6101R 3.0 (York University). 2 Credits

CC8060 (CMCT6510 6.0)  Cultural Production Workshop

Combines active media analysis with the production of images/text around environ­mental issues. Students critically explore the production process through media observa­tions, readings, and audio‑visuals, visits to production sites, and interviews with image­makers. There are opportunities to develop hands‑on skills in photographic or video production. The central learning experience of the workshop involves a media produc­tion applying analytical insight, technical skills, and creativity. Antirequisite ENVS 6349 6.0 (York University).  2 Credits 

CC8061 (CMCT6520 6.0)  Wired World: Culture, Tech. & contemp. Phil.

This course explores the intersection of philosophical thought with communication and information technology.  It considers both the importance of philosophical foundations for contemporary studies of technology as well as the philosophical implications of advances in contemporary communication technology.  2 Credits

CC8093 (CMCT 6909 6.0)  Field Placements

Master's students are able to receive credit for a two term course by undertaking a field placement in an appropriate institution. 2 Credits

CC8210 Genders, Sexualities and Screens

An interdisciplinary and cross-cultural interrogation of gender and sexuality in relation to a variety of media forms including film and television, cable, gaming and the Internet. We will take into account theories of popular culture, post-structuralism, feminist theory, visual culture, queer subjectivities and the body, as they impact upon media content, audiences, and sites of reception. Antirequisite: MP 8112    1 Credit

CC8211 History of Things (CMCT 6133 3.0)

This course explores critical debates and interdisciplinary research methods employed in the study of material objects. It draws on case studies and theoretical work on material culture, display, and representation to consider the influence of the ‘material turn’ on contemporary scholarship and on historical and curatorial practices.  1 Credit

CC8212  Post Secular Cinema (CMCT 6134 3.0)

This course aims to think through the relationship between modernity, religion, and the secular through a film-philosophical analysis of contemporary art and world cinema.  1 Credit

CC8213  Space and Cinema (CMCT 6132 3.0)

Examines a variety of ways that space is created and experienced in film, television and video art with a consideration of themes such as the spaces of production and exhibition, location shooting and realism, cultural industries and real estate, special effects and virtual spaces, cognitive maps and habitus, and moving images as monuments. Featured theorists include Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Henri Lefebvre, Andre Bazin, the Situationists, Fredric Jameson, Laura Mulvey, Jean Louis Baudry, Stephen Heath, Paula Massood and David Harvey. Antirequisite:  FILM 6242 or SPTH 6322 (York University).  1 credit

CC8310  World Politics  (CMCT 6326 3.0)

Popular culture in its many forms both reproduces and critiques received versions of world politics. This course explores the intersections of popular culture and world politics to ask what are the analytic and political possibilities of these sites.  Antirequisite: POLS 6221 (York University).  1 credit

CC8401  Accelerating Technicity  (CMCT6527 3.0)

This course explores critical debates and interdisciplinary research methods employed in the study of material objects. It draws on case studies and theoretical work on material culture, display, and representation to consider the influence of the ‘material turn’ on contemporary scholarship and on historical and curatorial practices.  1 Credit

CC8700  Intro. to Theories of Commun. & Culture

An intensive introduction to the major theories of communication and culture.  The course will provide an overview of the major themes and thinkers in the area.  Antirequisite AKCEFG4000 3.0 (York University).This course is a non-degree/non-credit course designed to provide background training and may be required of some students as conditions of admissions.  1 Credit

CC8701  Understanding Commun. Technologies

An intensive introduction for non-specialists to the history of communication technology and to the operation and uses of contemporary and emerging forms.  Use of lecture, seminar and studio/lab demonstrations will provide the participant with opportunities to connect technology theory and practice.  Antirequisite  CDGS701 (Ryerson University, Continuing Education).

This course is a non-degree/non-credit course designed to provide background training in current communication and media production and delivery technologies and may be required of some students as conditions of admissions.  1 Credit

CC8702 (CMCT 6325 3.0 ) Labour in Communication and Culture

This course reviews the theoretical and historical constitutions of labour in relation to communication and culture as it has been articulated as a distinct field of inquiry, and as evident in practices and institutions.  (York University)

CC8703 (CMCT 6539 3.0) Tech Mediations in Visual Culture

This course examines the interconnectedness of representation and visual culture in contemporary wired society. Students will critically explore and assess the influence and shaping of technological mediations in visual culture investigating theory, culture, globalization, and education. Antirequisites EDUC 5856, ARTH5185 (York University)

CC8819 (CMCT 65xx 3.0) Cultures of Museums and Archives

This course examines the cultures of museums and archives. Focusing on their history and contemporary practice, course investigates conditions under which institutions make explicit and conceal their political and educational mandates while further exploring their status as sites of resistance and cultural production.  Also, consideration is given to museum’s role in tourist industry and by extension, extent to which memory, trauma and history are commodified through museum and its commercial arms (e.g., museum gift shop).  1 Credit

CC8822 (CMCT 6112 3.0)  Performing Arts and the City

This course examines the impact of the performing arts on local communities. 1 Credit

CC8823 (CMCT 6116 3.0)  Transnat. Id., New Mediations & the Public

This course explores the ways in which communications technologies shape national identities and understandings of public goods.  We consider transformations and contestations of the public sphere, the public domain, intellectual property, freedom of speech, and multiculturalism in the face of an intensification of global population and cultural flows.  1 Credit

CC8824 (CMCT 6108 3.0)  Globalization: Mkts, Citizenship, Identity

This course examines the discourse and theory of globalization narratives, pre-and post-Seattle from a critical perspective as they affect markets, cultural policy, public goods and diverse citizenship needs.  1 Credit

CC8825 (CMCT 6130 3.0) Summer Seminar in Social, Cultural Theory

This seminar examines key aspects of contemporary social and cultural theory, focusing on the writings of an important theorist in the field.  Normally, that theorist will participate in the course for one week, offering a series of seminars on her/his work.  1 Credit

CC8826 (CMCT 6321 3.0) The Post-Human Cond’n.: Theory & Politics

Since the 1990’s “cyber” has altered what it means to be human in terms of self and other, essence, agency, consciousness, intimacy, intelligence, reason, life, embodiment, identity, and gender.  This course examines the meaning, possibilities, and implications of the posthuman.  1 Credit

CC8827 (CMCT6124 3.0)  City as Cinema:  Film and City Spaces

This course seeks to locate dialectic in the relation between the cinema and the city to discern how particular experiences of city space and temporality have been expressed in the non-linear narratives or decentred spaces of some recent films or in the very design of cinema screens and theatres. 1 credit

CC8828 (CMCT 6111 3.0) Philosophy, Culture & Values

This course explores philosophical concepts that we rely on as meaningful in communication.  It introduces students to metaphysical concepts and gives students a chance to explore how much of our world relies on shared metaphors in the struggle to communicate.  1 credit

CC8829 (CMCT 6109B 3.0) Modern Lit Circ: Cult’l Appr

Course studies culture of early twentieth-century modernist salons in New York, Paris, and London with focus on New York Dada, Left Bank Moderns, and Bloomsbury. Course explores a range of cultural expressions (print culture, visual culture and performance). More specifically, students investigate synergies of different media and nationalities and probe interrelationship among various artists; students also examine relationship of space including interior design and architecture in formation and flourishing of modernist salons and literary circles.  1 Credit.

CC8830 (CMCT 6128 3.0) Writing the Self, Reading the Life

This course will examine a variety of genres within the broadly defined category of life writing, including diary, memoir, autobiography, and biography.  By sampling a range of texts from print, graphic, and electronic sources, students will explore the diverse ways in which people, both famous and otherwise, have communicated their personal and public stories about life and selfhood throughout history.  1 Credit

CC8831 (CMCT 6125 3.0) Theorizing the Sacred

Some of the most important social theorists of the 20th Century ‑ including Georges Bataille, Walter Benjamin, René Girard, Jacques Derrida, and Slavoj Zizek ‑ have written on the sacred and its related phenomena (the gift, originary violence, monsters, etc). The sacred is not limited to religion, but also represents the underbelly of cultural and political life more generally. In analysing the sacred, special focus will be placed on both the role and content of cinema.  1 Credit

CC8832 (CMCT 6534) Communication and the Sociotechnical

This course investigates some of the texts in the burgeoning study of society and technology that have inspired its major philosophical perspectives and frameworks of research.  Socio‑cultural inquiry into new communication and information technologies frequently invokes one or another perspective grounded (selectively) in these texts; this course instead focuses on systematic comparison of the several distinct perspectives that characterize this area of study, with particular attention to their deployment in communication and culture research.  Six perspectives are surveyed in six modules of instruction: Institutionalism, Critical Theory, Feminism, Phenomenology, Social Constructionism, and Actor‑Network Theory.  1 Credit

CC8833 (CMCT 6123 3.0) Cultures of Sexuality and Gender

This course surveys theoretical approaches to cultures of sexuality and gender in relation to diverse media. Using feminist, queer, constructionist, posthumanist, and other approaches, the course develops students’ techniques of historicization and skills in analysing current debates in the field. 1 Credit

CC8834 (CMCT 6127 3.0)  Images of Animals

Referring to literary and media sources, as well as historical, cultural and scientific texts, the course examines the creation, development and consequences of varied perspectives on non-human animals and on the viability of animals in a world dominated by humans.   1 Credit

CC8835 (CMCT6323 3.0)  Global Cultural Flows After 9/11

This course will explore the way contemporary print and electronic media analysis is reshaping citizenship practice and state policy globally and locally.  One of the aims of the course is to examine the contradictory effects that global cultural flows have on ideas, media coverage, and new citizenship practices. It will also examine the ways ideoscapes are being redefined by the mass media by using thematic case studies to illuminate the extent to which the processes of globalization and new information technologies are altering the role of culture and communication in both the global North and South.  1 Credit

CC8836 (CMCT6135 3.0) Selected Topics in Media and Culture

The list of topics for discussion is flexible, depending upon the interests and preparation of students from year to year and the speciality of the course director.  This course is designed to provide opportunities for post-doctoral fellows, visiting scholars and SGS (or FGS York) appointed faculty to teach speciality courses in the field of Media and Culture. 1 Credit

CC8837 (CMCT 6136 3.0) Asian Studies Perspectives

The course examines how Asian spaces and identities have been produced historically drawing on perspectives from across the social sciences and humanities; and the current relevance of area studies in an era in which international scholarship is oriented toward globalisms and localisms. Antirequisites: HUMA 6135, GEOG 5700, ANTH 5500 or SOCI 6745 3.0 (York University) 1 Credit

CC8838 (CMCT 6137 3.0)  Postcoloniality

The course investigates Postcolonialism as a field within Cultural Studies. Emphasizing socio- and politico-cultural analyses, themes such as colonial discourse, orientalism, hybridity, resistance, subalternity, indigeneity, Eurocentrism, cultural imperialism, language, race, sexuality, gender, and subjectivity are examined through a range of interdisciplinary and conceptual perspectives.  Texts containing influential theoretical arguments are the primary focus, with some works from the Arts also featured. 1 Credit

CC8839 (CMCT 6540 3.0)  Sound Studies

This course aims to introduce graduate students to the diverse and interdisciplinary field of “sound studies.” We will read sound studies scholarship produced by academics and artists/practitioners in recent years as well as going back to one or two “seminal” texts in the field. The goal of the course is to provide students with a broad introduction to the range of scholarship in the field rather than focus on one particular disciplinary or methodological approach.  1 Credit

CC8840 (CMCT 6314 3.0)  Media Democracy

This course examines the central role of the news media in a democratic society, with an emphasis on Canada.  The constraints on media democracy, exploring various media from newspapers to the internet and attempts to address the lack of media democracy will be explored.  1 Credit

CC8841 (CMCT 6318 3.0)  Owning Culture

The course explores the ways in which law shapes popular culture, with emphasis upon the intellectual property regimes of copyright, publicity rights, trademark, and domain names.  We consider how these laws create rights to control meaning and effect forms of censorship, while provoking the emergence of alternative community norms. 1 Credit

CC8842 (CMCT 6316  3.0)  Public Affairs Media

This course examines public affairs radio, television and convergence media from an historical and critical perspective.  These media are examined with reference to models of broadcasting, public address, technology and globalization. 1 Credit

CC8843 (CMCT 6317 3.0)  Cultural Industries, Trade and the WTO

This course examines the impact of trade and the WTO framework in shaping the culture and communications policy environment for governments and communities.  It is designed as a research seminar to enable students to examine the way the WTO is shaping and influencing cultural and communications policy. 1 Credit

CC8844 (CMCT 6340 3.0)  Introduction to Broadcast Management

Television is the most powerful form of public communication and, in Canada, is a highly regulated business. Those who manage television enterprises must balance business objectives and the public good in a changing creative and technological environment.  This course examines issues in the management of public and private television enterprises in Canada.  Students will investigate each issue in its historical context and will analyze the current environment and scenarios for the future of Canadian broadcasting.  The course will include field visits and industry guests.  1 Credit

CC8845 (CMCT 6321 3.0)  Communication & International Development

This course brings together various theoretical and policy approaches to communication and international development.  As a seminar, selected critical readings will serve as a backdrop for discussions on the nexus of communication, technology, development and the nation-state.  We will interrogate the historical and social construction of development and underdevelopment, and how state actors mobilize the rhetoric of technology to galvanize support for the national development.  1 Credit

CC8846 (CMCT 6315 3.0)  Communication and Public Interest

This course explores the meaning of “public” in the context of media and public information/advocacy campaigns.  A background in communication theory is recommended but not required.  1 Credit

CC8847 (CMCT 6319 3.0)  Global Media

This course examines global media from an historical and critical perspective.  Broadcasts, publications, films and digital productions are viewed as transnational communication channels which have a decisive impact on contemporary life.  1 Credit

CC8848 (CMCT 6322 3.0)  Armed Conflict

Focusing on periods of armed conflict, the course analyzes the nature and extent of corporate and government ownership or control of communication, the representations of social relations and competing discourses of war, terrorism and peace, practices of journalism and media activism, and the role and responsibilities of content producers during such time.  1 Credit

CC8849 (CMCT 6335 3.0)  Selected Topics in Politics and Policy

The list of topics for discussion is flexible, depending upon the interests and preparation of students from year to year and the speciality of the course director.  This course is designed to provide opportunities for post-doctoral fellows, visiting scholars and SGS (or FGS York) appointed faculty to teach speciality courses in the field of Politics and Policy. 1 Credit

CC8850 (CMCT6336 3.0) Politics of Aesthetics

The Politics of Aesthetics develops an aesthetic framework from eight Continental philosophers who have an aesthetic theory as part of their philosophy. The philosophers include Hegel, Heidegger, Badiou, Ranciere, Bataille, Baudrillard, Virilio and Deleuze. These are selected because their philosophy facilitates the artwork surpassing the aesthetic theory. Antirequisite: POLS 6087 3.0 (York University)  1 Credit

CC8860 (CMCT 6537 3.0) Digital Games and Learning

This course examines play as it is currently developed and popularly imagined in commercial computer- and consoled-based games in order to more closely examine what is “learned” in those immersive environments and ask how they might more productively be harnessed for educative ends. Antirequisite: EDUC 5863 (York University)  1 Credit

CC8861 (CMCT 6538 3.0) Bodies in Technology

This course explores the ways in which technological representations of the body are reshaping the boundaries between technical and biological, thus giving rise to ‘new’ conceptualizations of the embodiment, identity and agency.    Antirequisite STS6200 (York University)  1 Credit

CC8862 (CMCT6508 3.0) Future Cinema II: Applied Theory

This hands-on course gives students an opportunity to learn about new screen technologies, approaches and techniques in a lab environment. Students will work in the lab to build prototypes that will function as a testing ground for both new technology and future cinema theory. Our method is iterative: there is an urgent need for scholars in this field to be both theorists and practical experimenters, to research while doing.  Antirequisite: FILM 5246 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8863 (CMCT6526 3.0) Media History

This course examines a wide range of issues and periods in North American and Western European media history between 1500 and 1980, combining approaches from cultural studies, political economy and archivally-based historical research. It focuses on emergence and evolution of new media forms and technologies in the past, including news media, the telegraph and global information networks, the first mass-audience media, and radio and television (both cultural and institutional perspectives).  Antirequisite:  HIST 5730 (York University) 1 Credit

CC8902 (CMCT 6002 3.0)  Research Methodologies

Students in the core courses are required to attend a workshop on research methods in communication and cultural studies.  These sessions are designed to complement the theoretical materials presented in the core seminars and will provide an overview of the range of research methods in communication and cultural studies.  The course introduces students to a wide range of methods and approaches, including research design (qualitative and quantitative), survey research, content analysis, textual analysis, discourse analysis, historiography, legal and documentary research, ethnographic techniques, cultural studies approaches and others.  Masters Core Course.  1 Credit

CC8905 (CMCT 6005 3.0)  MA Research Specialization and Practice

This combination lecture/seminar course consolidates graduate coursework and bridges the transition to independent critical research. It assists and evaluates the student in developing professional skills including: peer review, grant-writing, formal presentations, conference and publication’s submission which may include applied research in submissions to government or organizational policy papers, and public forums or hearings on communication and culture.  Antirequisite:  CC8903.  1 Credit.

CC8906  (CMCT 6004 3.0) CC: An Interdisciplinary Approach

This course introduces a critical approach to the three symbiotic areas of the program at the graduate level: media and culture; politics and policy, and technology in practice: applied perspectives. The course will explore each area in modules that concentrate on four aspects: history; philosophy; theory; and principle concepts or issues, with one week dedicated to each aspect in each area. Antirequisite:  CC8900, CC8901.  1 Credit. 

CC8920 (CMCT 6100 3.0)  Theoretical Approaches to Media & Culture

This course reviews central issues in the study of media and culture through an examination of the ways in which mediations of social identity (e.g. class, gender, race, sexuality, nationality), act as highly selective and ideologically shaped portrayals of the social order. The course is built around a number of current and “classical” theories which allow particular insight into the articulations of representation (discursive, imagistic, visual) with human identity, subjectivity and selfhood.  These theoretical frames of reference are also applied in the analysis of various media forms and genres., including text, photography, television, film and the built environment. (Foundation Course). Antirequisite: POLS 6055 3.0 (York University). 1 Credit

CC8921 (CMCT 6110 3.0)  Visual Culture

The course will begin by exploring the ways in which we have been taught to analyse and understand images, and how to produce and reproduce them.  The course aims, however, to move beyond analysis of specific texts in order to historicize and understand the larger cultural meanings that have been assigned to the visual.  We will attempt to come to terms with what W. J. T. Mitchell has called the “pictoral turn” in all its complexity.  The course includes works by philosophers and cultural theorists as well as poets, painters, novelists, videographers, filmmakers, and cyberneticists.  1 Credit

CC8922 (CMCT 6101 3.0)  Issues in Cultural Studies

This course is an advanced examination of the contribution of cultural studies perspectives to the study of communication and culture, with emphasis on contemporary problems and theories. 1 Credit

Note: This course will focus on the needs of PhD students.  MA students with appropriate background will be admitted with permission.

CC8923 (CMCT 6102 3.0)  Culture as Performance-Anth. of the Arts

This course explores expressive culture by examining the performance and products which express cultural meaning. It investi­gates how performances are produced, interpreted and transformed through time, utilizing theoretical arguments related to the process of cultural pro­duction, including structuralism, formal analysis, semiotics and hermeneutics. Key questions include: how are artistic domains integrated within a society? What regularities and patterns can be seen cross‑­culturally within one form of artistic expression? How do artistic forms condense and communicate key symbolic messages? How is artistic expression trans­formed through mass culture and tourism?  1 Credit

CC8924 (CMCT 6095 3.0)  Marxism, Culture and Film

This course examines the Marxist tradition in cultural and aesthetic theory and practice. It considers selections from the philosophical and aesthetic writing of Marx and Engels and later Marxists like Lukacs, Gramsci, Lenin and Trotsky and goes on to consider the Frankfurt School, James, Debord, Althusser, Williams, Jamieson, Said and Eagleton, among others. Theoretical and creative work by major artists like Brecht, Eisenstein, Godard and Alea will be discussed. Selected important debates and controversies about Soviet culture, the role avant‑gardes, realism and socialist realism, cultural imperialism and colonialism, feminism, modernism and postmodernism will be discussed. Specific discussions will focus on analysis and practice related to the Marxist and socialist tradition in film, selected from the Soviet 20s, Renoir and the French Popular Front, the Hollywood Reds, Italian neo‑realism, Godard and May '68 and the Third Cinema of the "third world".  Antirequisite POLS 6055 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8925 (CMCT 6104 3.0)  Reading Television

Fundamental to contemporary cultural studies is recognition that the meaning, form and value of cultural products such as situation comedies, soap operas, advertisements, cannot be separated from the social context in which they are produced and received. The course will explore such questions as: What are the genre conventions? How do different individual communities use and value television products? To what extent do television products promote resistance and change and to what extent do they preserve the status quo? Students will apply several frameworks to selected products in order to analyse how the products work in relation to individuals and communities.  1 Credit

CC8926 (CMCT 5101 3.0)  Theoretical Issues in Film

This course examines screen representation from a historical, sociological, and critical perspective, introducing relevant contemporary theoretical approaches framed as analysis of a particular theme, period, filmmaker, or genre.  Attention is given to a range of problems including filmic representation and indexicality; dramaturgy; the history of filmic representation and its political economy; filmic representation and hegemony.  Antirequisite FILM 5210 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8927 (CMCT 6096 3.0)  Reading Film

The course examines screen representation of gender as expressivity and enactment, from a historical, sociological, and critical perspective focusing largely on dramaturgy.  Relevant approaches are introduced and a focused study of films and theoretical issues of choice is enabled. 1 Credit

CC8928 (CMCT 6120 3.0)  Culture and the Environment

Critical exploration into current literature in the emerging field of Cultural Studies.  Examination of the discourses through which we attach “culture” to nature, place, and space.  Particular attention is given to what resources contemporary cultural studies might offer in analyzing interactions between culture, nature, and place; between social identity, community, and built and natural environments.  1 Credit

CC8929 (CMCT 5104 3.0)  Seminar in Symbolic Anthropology

Particular attention is placed on a fundamental understanding of symbolic thought and action with the aim of addressing the questions: how do symbols symbolize? How do they function to mediate meanings and transform sentiment and emotions into significant inducements or dispositions to action? Literature in anthropology, language and linguistics, semiotics and literary criticism among others are surveyed.  Antirequisite ANTH 5140 3.0 (York University). 1 Credit

CC8930 (CMCT 6105 3.0)  Culture and Values in Popular Media

This course examines the rights, freedoms and social obligations of the media, with special attention to content producers and disseminators, both private and public. The issues of freedom of expression and its limits, access to information, privacy, and accountability are highlighted. The role of audiences as citizens, consumers and potential producers of content is also examined. 1 Credit

CC8931 (CMCT 6106 3.0)  Popular Music Studies

The phenomenon of popular music is investigated from a number of perspectives through a survey of scholarly and popular vernacular literature. Issues in popular music, including paradigms for analysis and interpretation are examined.  Antirequisite MUSI 6320 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8932 (CMCT 6114 3.0)  Communication, Culture and the City

This course will examine a variety of conceptions of culture in use in the social sciences, humanities and fine arts in particular with relevance to how they can be used to inquire into social forms and practices of city life. The course will further seek to perpetuate an ongoing intellectual relationship to the reciprocal exchanges between interpretation of culture and of the city and bring this discussion to bear on representations of space, urbanity, communication, congestion and memory. Readings will include Durkheim, Weber, Simmel, Park, Bakhtin, Benjamin, Harvey, Seja, and Sassen.  . Antirequisites SOCI 6132 3.0 (York University), SPT 6626 3.0 (York University). 1 Credit

CC8933 (CMCT 6115 3.0)  Culture in the City Workshop

This course will be conducted as a research workshop in which students will be encouraged to initiate, design, and develop an exploratory study on a specific social process in the city, and create a framework for treating spaces and localities as interpretive problems through qualitative methods.  The workshop will provide experience and skill in case study analysis and ethnographic and documentary methods for interpreting texts, sites and social actions. The instructor will aid students in identifying problems related to select areas of urban life and in generating a small study as a course requirement. Students will be expected to contribute to the collegiality of the environment by discussing their mutual work as part of a process of developing theoretically informed case studies. Antirequisite SOCI 6132 3.0 (York University), SPT 6626 3.0 (York University). 1 Credit

CC8934 (CMCT6113 3.0)  Contemporary Topics in Social Theory

The purpose of this course is to take up issues that are topical and require some knowledge of social, political, philosophical and psychoanalytic theory.  Antirequisites SOCI 6220 3.0 (York University), SPT 6043 3.0 (York University), PHIL 6640 3.0 (York University) 1 Credit

CC8935 (CMCT 6121 3.0)  The Critique of Everyday Culture

An attempt to integrate various theoretical frameworks centering on the twin problematics of everyday life and the study of popular culture.  In particular, it examines anthropological, phenomenological, semiological, hermeneutical and neo-Marxist approaches to culture.  Antirequisites SOCI 6130 3.0 (York University), SPT 6609 3.0 (York University) 1 Credit

CC8936 (CMCT 6107 3.0)  The Cultural Conditions of Authorship

With its focus on the author and the cultural conditions of authorship, this course aims to fill a gap in current course offerings in the Media and Culture stream of Program. The author and the book are all but absent from a program that studies the dynamics of media and cultural production.  This course returns to the subject of the book as one of the earliest and most enduring examples of cultural production.  By focusing on the economy of the culture industry – specifically the social, political, historical, and material conditions of authorship – this course undertakes a study of the commodification of Canadian authors that began in the early nineteenth century and continues to this day. 1 Credit

CC8938 (CMCT 6109B 3.0)  Special Topics in Media and Culture B

Under this rubric, program faculty members propose limited duration courses arising from major research projects or current issues. 1 Credit

CC8939 (CMCT 6109A 3.0)  Special Topics in Media and Culture A

Under this rubric, program faculty members propose limited duration courses arising from major research projects or current issues.  1 Credit

CC8940 (CMCT 6300 3.0)  The Political Econ. of Culture & Commun.

This course reflects the theoretical perspective that communication systems and cultural practices shape and are shaped by the social distribution of power in all societies. It examines the role of the state, the market civil society in the production and distribution of cultural products and the implications of their relationships for society. (Foundation Course)  1 Credit

CC8941 (CMCT 6301 3.0)  Issues in Communication & Cultural Policy

This course focuses on specific issues that are shaping communication and cultural policy, including the emergence of the “information highway,” globalization and convergence.  (Foundation Course)  1 Credit

CC8942 (CMCT 6302 3.0)  Cross‑Cultural and International Commun.

This course examines communication in the context of divergent cultural value systems, differing levels of technological adaptation, and unequal power configurations. It explores applications in international development, business communication, and cross-cultural electronic communication. 1 Credit

CC8943 (CMCT 6303 3.0)  Globalization of Communication & Culture

This course focuses on the role and significance of the rapid growth of multinational communication industries in shaping the modern world, with particular emphasis on the relationship between technology and the structures of power and control. Global communication systems, the global economy, and global crises will be examined from a critical perspective.  1 Credit

Note: This course will focus on the needs of PhD students.  MA students with appropriate background will be admitted with permission.

CC8944 (CMCT 5301 3.0)  Technology and Globalization

This course examines the role of technology within the global context.  What will it mean to be part of a global audience, work in a global factory, shop in a global supermarket, be governed by a world government? Can technology help to solve problems of environmental depletion and pollution? What role does technology play in escalating militarism around the world? Can technology reduce the gap between rich and poor, within nations and between nations?  Antirequisite: POL607.  1 Credit

CC8946 (CMCT 6305 3.0)  Communication Policy

This course will examine the structure and functioning of the media industries and explore the government policies that have been developed to try to ensure that the media function effectively and in the public interest. While emphasis will be placed on the communication media in Canada, attention will also be given to the way in which the media function in other countries and on an international basis. In examining Canadian government policy, attention will be given to public policies in other countries. The mandate and operation of agencies such as the CRTC, the CBC, the National Film Board, and Telefilm Canada will be examined, as well as the central policy development mandate of the federal Department of Canadian Heritage (Previously the Department of Communications). The course will include an examination of a number of major federal policy documents. Attention will be given to special issues arising from the bilingual nature and regional character of Canadian society and to the respective roles of federal and provincial governments.  While the primary emphasis is on established media, the course will include consideration of issues related to new media, including discussion of the Information Highway Advisory Council's Phase I and II reports.  Antirequisite ARTM 6330 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8947 (CMCT 6306 3.0)  Cultural Policy

This course examines the relationship between cultural and social policy in Canada through the study of historical and contemporary examples. In so doing, focusing on arts policies, the course will examine the historical development of policy and the formulation and execution of municipal, provincial and federal policies in Canada. The course will have a research orientation and will focus in particular on current issues in arts and cultural policy and strategies for the future. Where appropriate, comparative analyses will examine other policy models with special reference to Europe, Britain, and the United States.  Antirequisite ARTM 6300 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8948 (CMCT 5302 3.0)  The Image Industry

Images are organized into presentations and exhibi­tions in books and periodicals, in cinemas, in concerts, plays, and perform­ances, at conferences and conventions, in galleries, in lectures and readings on television and closed circuit systems, in recordings, and theatres. This course examines the nature and operations of the image industry, its relationship with image users and consumers and its interaction with individual image makers. Antirequisite NPF 552.  1 Credit

CC8949 (CMCT 5303 3.0)  The Communications Industry

This course is designed to provide a perspective on the Canadian information technology and tele­com­muni­cations industry, in international context. It provides an in‑depth understanding of the structure and dynamics of voice, data, video, internet, wire­less, hardware and content markets. It explores the current environment, trends, and major players, including their strategies and prospects. Antirequisite AIM 307. 1 Credit

CC8950 (CMCT 5304 3.0)  Current Issues in Telecommunications

This course explores emerging issues of interest to telecommunications and informa­tion technology analysis, managers, and policy‑makers. It assumes a basic under­standing of the technology and industry and features presentations by leading experts in regulations, technology, and emerging issues. Antirequisite AIM 407.  1 Credit

CC8951 (CMCT 6307 3.0)  Communications Law

Communication law and regulation are viewed from two perspectives: first, the rationales for regulating broadcasting and telecommunications are explored; and secondly, areas of law and regulation in the fields of broadcasting and telecommunications are examined, including cultural regulation, standards, access, quality service, new services, and rates. This course will examine law, policy, and regulations concerning broadcasting (radio, TV and news services) and telecommunications. Of particular interest are questions about controversial and biased programming, access to media, Canadian content, and the implications of competition and new services in the Canadian broadcasting system. In telecommunications, emphasis will be given to issues arising from competition and new technologies.  Antirequisite Law 3005 3.0 (Osgoode).   1 Credit

CC8952 (CMCT 6310 3.0)  Polit.Econ.of Media: Tech/Polit/Global

The course examines the profound transformation of the media industries by new technologies and market applications, such as satellite television, the Internet, and the digital revolution. These tech­nological and commercial forces have destabilized national media landscapes, especially where govern­ment policies and regulations have attempted to protect and promote domestic cultural and com­munica­tions industries. The course examines the emergence of transnational commerce actors in the media industries and their impact on political arrange­ments. Canada is discussed in comparative perspective.  1 Credit

CC8953 (CMCT 6308 3.0)  The Politics of Intellectual Property

The expansion of intellectual property rights (IPRs) has become a major area of international controversy and global resistance as these properties come into conflict with broader public interests and violate human rights.  The course explores the new regimes of trade that are expanding the privatization of more and more areas of human life, the political and social consequences of these expanded rights and struggles involving farmers, feminists, developing countries and indigenous peoples to protest and contain these rights.  1 Credit                                

CC8954 ( CMCT 5307 3.0)  New Social Movements

Examination of new social movements that have arisen in response to the crisis of industrial culture, economic restructuring, shifting political formations, and ecological disasters. The focus is on current theories of social movements in action. Opportunities for students to gain first‑hand experience with social movement organizations through participatory research projects are provided. Antirequisite ENVS 5073 3.0 (York University), ENVS 4161 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit 

CC8956 (CMCT 6311 3.0)  Globalization and Cultural Identities

This course explores globalization and its influence on the construction of cultural identities.  We address the contested term and its impact on nations, institutions, and peoples as they experience in local situations special and temporal transformations produced in discourses, images, and actions resulting from this process.  Antirequisite SPTH 6212 3.0 (York University) and ANTH 5135 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8958 (CMCT 6313 3.0)  Readings in Public Policy

Exploration of key ideas about public policy processes with an emphasis on how this process is played out in the various policy areas of interest to students in the course.  Antirequisite ENVS 6101R 3.0 (York University). 1 Credit

CC8959 (CMCT 6309 3.0)  Special Topics in Politics and Policy

Under this rubric, program faculty members propose limited duration courses arising from major research projects or current issues.  1 Credit

CC8960 (CMCT 6500 3.0)  Advanced Communication Technology

This course is an exploration of the major current issues for communication and culture raised by contemporary and emerging communication technologies and their applications. The course encompasses theoretical and applied perspectives.  (Foundation Course) 1 Credit

CC8961 (CMCT 6501 3.0)  Issues in Media Production

Contemporary theory is employed to examine the changes in socio‑technical systems and the pro­duction environment as well as the craft. Group projects may include radio news and drama, broadcast and print journalism, documentation for studio television, as well as CD‑ROM, visualization, and web‑based projects. 1 Credit

CC8962 (CMCT 6503 3.0)  Language & Narrative in Film/Video/Mm

Each medium has its own conventions for creating meaning. New interactive media demand new approaches to creating meaning. This course examines the evolu­tion of language and narrative from a theoretical and practical perspective. 1 Credit

CC8963 (CMCT 6504 3.0)  Social and Cult. Implications of New Media

This course focuses on the changes brought about by changes in communication technology for individuals, groups and organizations, and the challenges and opportunities presented by them.  1 Credit

CC8964 (CMCT 6505 3.0)  The Diffusion of Commun. Technologies

Technology is often adopted in ways not anticipated by its creators and is shaped by the interaction of technological innovation, economic interests, and social and political power. This course explores the models developed for understanding the diffusion of communication technologies in society and examines specific cases, such as the printing press, the motion picture, the telephone, television, the computer, and the Internet.  1 Credit

CC8965 (CMCT 6506 3.0)  Communication in Organizations

This course presents a framework for understanding communication in organiza­tions, including contingency, structuration, and interpretive approaches. The course exposes students to a variety of perspec­tives on telecommunication. It considers technological, social, cultural and economic perspectives at the organizational level and their implications. 1 Credit

CC8966 (CMCT 6516 3.0)  Activist Video Making

From the earliest of times, the potential of using film and video to animate, agitate and educate has attracted committed film and video-makers.  Participants in this course will be involved in the collaborative production of short community-based video works focused on selected social and political issues.  The course will also include an historical overview of documentaries made by film and video makers engaged in radical production, post-production and distribution practices.  Antirequisite FILM 5320 3.0 (York University)  1 Credit

CC8967 (CMCT 5501 3.0)  Contemporary Theory in the Visual Arts

The course contextualizes the contemporary structuralist, psychoanalytical feminist, Marxist, and postmodernist theory with respect to the history and development of specific art practice in the visual arts and its relationship to society. The relationship between contemporary critical theory and artistic production will be addressed through an examination of prescribed reading and examples of works drawn from the visual arts, film, video, new media and performance. This examination incorporates an analysis of French, British and North American sources together with debates, artistic productions, and explorations by contemporary artists.  Antirequisite VISA 5600 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8968 (CMCT 5502 3.0)  History and Theory of Film and Video

This course enables students to concentrate on specific aspects of the history and theory of film and video. The course deals with national and alternative cinema, film genres and alternative video. The relationship between the aesthetic features of given works and their cultural production are emphasized.  Antirequisite NPF 557. 1 Credit

CC8969 (CMCT 5503 3.0)  Media Ethics

An examination of the rights, freedoms, and obligations of the media and of practicing journalists. The course deals with such issues as the grounds and limits of freedom of expression, moral responsibilities respecting truth, balance, and objectivity; ethical and business pressures in media; obligations to the public, the audience, sources, colleagues, employers, and oneself. The course includes case studies and discussion of ongoing media activity. Antirequisite PHL 530.  1 Credit

CC8970 (CMCT 5504 3.0)  Special Topics in Canadian Cinema

A seminar course focusing on particular topics in Canadian film and video. Antirequisite FILM 5310 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8971 (CMCT 5505 3.0)  Experimental Media

In the past century, groups of artists have repeatedly called for new methods for the creation of artworks, to revitalize arts that had grown dreary, stale, and predictable.  The course comprises workshops and seminars and explores the value of such proposals. Antirequisite NPF555.  1 Credit

CC8972 (CMCT 5506 3.0)  Experimental Film Processes

An exploration of alternatives to conventional ways of producing black and white and colour cinematographic images, including non‑standard ways of generating cinematographic images and unorthodox means of transforming them.  Antirequisite FNP 544. 1 Credit

Note: Students with appropriate background may take selected production courses in various units for graduate credit, with permission. A list of Ryerson and York courses available for this purpose will be made available prior to registration in September.

CC8973 (CMCT 6502 3.0)  Design for Interactive Multimedia

This course examines multimedia produc­tion in the context of a studio environment. Particular emphasis is placed on design models and their applications.  1 Credit

CC8974 (CMCT 6510 3.0)  Cultural Production Workshop

Combines active media analysis with the production of images/text around environ­mental issues. Students critically explore the production process through media observa­tions, readings, and audio‑visuals, visits to production sites, and interviews with image­makers. There are opportunities to develop hands‑on skills in photographic or video production. The central learning experience of the workshop involves a media produc­tion applying analytical insight, technical skills, and creativity. Antirequisite ENVS 6349 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit 

CC8975 (CMCT 6511 3.0)  Race and Gender in Digital Technology

In recent years, corporate leaders, government officials, and media pundits have portrayed the western restructured socio-economic near-future as a “digital” one, forefronting the centrality of digital technology and the digitisation of information to the social, economic, and political changes currently sweeping Canada, as well as the rest of the OECD.  In this course, we will examine the ways in which race and gender manifest in the discourses, policy decisions and representations of digital technology in Canada. 1 Credit

CC8976 (CMCT 6512 3.0)  Digital and Interactive Entertainment

This course examines the convergence of digital content, broadband and wireless distribution over a variety of display platforms.  If compatibility standards and data-protection schemes are worked out, we will be able to enjoy, create and distribute content in a variety of new ways.  1 Credit

CC8977 (CMCT 6517 3.0)  Media Production Techniques and Practices

This course introduces students to a wide range of media-making techniques and production processes, including those currently employed and emerging in various media industries.  The course will include lab demonstrations, practical workshops and examination of the context and social implications of these techniques and processes.  1 Credit.

CC8978 (CMCT 6514 3.0)  Documentary Narration

While non-fiction films are most frequently discussed in terms of the images they bring to us, most of these films from early sound newsreels to present day historical essays are in fact highly dependent upon the quality of their voice-over narration.  This course will focus on the nature of the writing that has shaped those works, including its relationship to the images.  The course will also examine the way in which voice-over narration is used in television news and television actuality programming as well as personal essays. Antirequisite: FILM 5320P 3.0 (York University).  1 Credit

CC8979 (CMCT 6509 3.0)  Special Topics in Technology and Commun.

Under this rubric, program faculty members propose limited duration courses arising from major research projects or current issues. 1 Credit

CC8980 (CMCT 6518 3.0)  Advanced Media Production: Project

This course offers students who have advanced production skills and who have successfully completed the necessary technical proficiency examinations to access equipment and an opportunity to develop and produce their own media project.  Students will work independently or in teams to produce a previously approved production using existing or emerging technologies from a variety of media.  1 Credit

CC8981 (CMCT 6513 3.0)  Struggle for Internet Creativity & Innov.

This course is about the future of ideas. The Internet environment was originally designed to enable the new and is now being transformed to protect the old.  The course examines principles and technologies needed to let innovation flourish on the Internet. 1 Credit

CC8982 (CMCT 6118 3.0)  The Body and the Culture of Modernity

In the later half of the twentieth century, the body emerged as a topic that attracted the efforts of many artists who were committed to some form of cultural critique.  Many recent artists have revolted against the modern body – the mechanized, regimented, controlled and profoundly unfree body.  They have strived to move beyond the culture of modernity by creating a Dionysian body culture that is life-affirming, a culture that expresses bodily energies and passions, a culture that will bind people together in shared cultural experiences of ecstasy and intoxication.  They have strived to dissolve the individual ego in collective ecstasy and sensual surrender.  In this course we will survey some themes that arise in recent body art and assess their political/cultural implications. 1 Credit

CC8983 (CMCT 6117 3.0)  The Culture of the Avant-garde

In this course we survey a number of avant-garde art movements of the twentieth century.  We first consider the cultural paradigm that these various artistic movements reacted against, the paradigm known as modernity.  We then examine various vanguard artistic movements of the twentieth-century as expressions of discontent with the culture of modernity.  We do this partly through selected readings in cultural theory; however, the principal source of information will be the manifestos the various movements issued. 1 Credit

CC8984 (CMCT 6519 3.0)  A History of News

This course studies the evolution of news as a historical phenomenon.  It focuses on the various forms which news has taken at different periods and in different places; on how these forms have been influenced by changing technology, business organization, and markets; on how different audiences have responded to news; and on how the producers of news have understood their role in relation to their society, their audiences, their employers and their peers.  1 Credit

CC8985 (CMCT 6515 3.0) Photographic Vision/Practice

The importance of photographic imagery in history, culture, media and communication is widely acknowledged but is for the most part unexamined. This course proposes an investigation into the materials and methods of photographic image-making, combined with a survey of key critical writings and the contemporary theories about photographic representation that grow out of these. This dual investigation will be supplemented by independent research and writing undertaken by each student. Critical texts will balance writings of practicing photographers (Paul Strand, Gisele Freund, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert dams) with those of critics and theorists (Walter Benjamin, Jean Beaudrillard, Alan Sekula, Susan Sontag); in addition, several contemporary anthologies (by Richard Bolton, Vicki Goldberg, Liz Wells) will also provide source material.  1 Credit

CC8986 (CMCT 6507 3.0) Future Cinema I

This course examines the shift from the traditional cinematic spectacles to works probing the frontiers of interactive, performative, and networked media.  Drawing upon a broad range of scholarship, including film theory, communication studies, cultural studies and new media theory, the course will consider how digital technologies are transforming the semiotic fabric of contemporary visual cultures.  1 Credit

CC8987 (CMCT 6535)  Selected Topics in Technology in Practice

The list of topics for discussion is flexible, depending upon the interests and preparation of students from year to year and the speciality of the course director.  This course is designed to provide opportunities for post-doctoral fellows, visiting scholars and SGS (or FGS York) appointed faculty to teach speciality courses in the field of Technology in Practice. 1 Credit

CC 8988 (CMCT 6524)  Design and Research Theory

For the past 25 years the discipline of design has been developing its own theoretical and research base. This course examines both the range and findings of the design research that has been completed and reviews the theoretical groundwork for mapping out individual research strategies for the future. The course employs lectures, case studies, and exploration at both the individual and group levels. Antirequisite MDES 5101, York University.   1 Credit

CC8989 (CMCT 6525)  Design Issues, Critical Making

This course examines contextual issues for communication design. Topics include technological innovation, social change, cultural values and behaviour, and business models. The course employs lectures, presentations and extensive readings.  Antirequisite  MDES 5102, York University.   1 Credit

CC8990 (CMCT 6911 3.0)  Directed Readings in Commun. and Culture A

The directed readings course is intended to permit the student to survey a coherent body of literature in an area of study related to the student’s program objectives.  1 Credit

CC8991 (CMCT 6902 3.0)  Directed Research in Commun. and Culture

The directed research course is intended to permit the student to conduct research or develop a theoretical perspective in an area of study related to the student’s program objectives.  The research may take the form of a pilot study for a thesis or dissertation project. 1 Credit

CC8992 (CMCT 6903 3.0)  Directed Group Study in Commun. and Culture

The directed group study is intended to allow a group of students, with the agreement of a faculty member, to organize a seminar in an area not covered in the course offerings. 1 Credit

CC8993 (CMCT 6909 3.0)  Field Placements

Master's students are able to receive credit for a one term course by undertaking a field placement in an appropriate institution. 1 Credit

CC8994 (CMCT 6911 3.0)  Directed Readings in Commun. and Culture B

The directed readings course is intended to permit the student to survey a coherent body of literature in an area of study related to the student’s program objectives.  1 Credit

CC9900 (CMCT 7200 3.0)  Advanced Research Methodologies

The principal aim of this course is to cultivate a critical research sensibility that addresses questions of communication and culture and their intersection, with research being defined as an engaged process of enquiry and discovery that leads to the production of social knowledge.   Different models of reality will necessarily lead to (1) different propositions about what communicational reality is, and with this (2) different ways of establishing what can be accepted as real, (3) different ways of justifying the data relevant to reality, and (4) different strategies for collecting such data. Doctoral Course.    1 Credit

CC9904 (CMCT 7000 3.0)  Perspectives in Commun. & Cultural Studies

[formerly Advanced Theories in Communication & Culture I]  This course provides an advanced exploration of the major theories and research approaches in the field, with particular attention to a critical assessment of contemporary theories and methods. The first segment of the course will introduce students to those classical theorists and philosophers whose work was taken up and developed by more recent studies in the late twentieth century. It therefore deliberately anticipates issues that were subsequently developed so that students may be equipped to decide in the second part of the course which themes are relevant or irrelevant to the study of communication and culture. Doctoral Course. 1 Credit

CC9906  (CMCT 7005 3.0)  PhD Field Seminar: Disciplinary Practices

This seminar facilitates independent doctoral research by developing skills of disciplinary rigour in relation to individual research interests. It provides guidance in the advancement of field and area specialties in preparation for comprehensive qualifying exams, dissertation proposal, and ethics review process. It includes theories and practices of critical pedagogy and praxis, academic and professional publication, and other elements of professional research.  Antirequisite:  CC9903.  1 Credit.

CC9920 (CMCT 7120 3.0)  Selected Topics in Psychoanalysis and Culture

This course will survey some of the key concepts of Freudian and post-Freudian theory and assess their value in the study of culture and society.  The course will then present an overview of some of the ways that psychoanalytic theory has been used in the study of culture.  1 Credit

CC9921 (CMCT 7500 3.0)  Technology, Communication and Culture

Employing the insights of the Toronto school and related theories, this course explores culture and technology as productive processes, with emphasis on the historical development of communication technologies and their influence on culture and society. Doctoral Foundation Course.  1 Credit

CC9922 (CMCT 7125 3.0) Cinema and Media: Key Concepts

The course will explore key concepts, texts and debates in the field of contemporary cinema and media studies.  A central focus of course will be on the intellectual and material histories of cinema studies and media studies as disciplines (and their recent convergence), including the development of different models of film study (film as art, culture, sociological force, industry, etc); the development of classical film theory and film criticism; semiotics and feminist film theory; the historical turn; and the mutual influence of other disciplines in relation to the study of cinema and media. Antirequisite: FILM 7000 3.0 (York University)   1 Credit

CC9990 (CMCT 7011 3.0)  Directed Readings A

A directed readings course is intended to permit the student to survey a coherent body of literature in an area of study related to the student’s program objectives.  Doctoral Course. 1 Credit

CC9991 (CMCT 7012 3.0)   Directed Readings B

A directed readings course is intended to permit the student to survey a coherent body of literature in an area of study related to the student’s program objectives.  Doctoral Course. 1 Credit

CC9992 (CMCT 7002 3.0)  Directed Research

A directed research course is intended to permit the student to conduct research or develop a theoretical perspective in an area of study related to the student’s program objectives.  The research may take the form of a pilot study for a thesis or dissertation project.  Doctoral Course. 1 Credit

CC9993 (CMCT 7003 3.0)  Directed Group Study

Under this heading, a group of students, with the agreement of a faculty member, may organize a seminar in an area not covered in the course offerings.  Doctoral Course. 1 Credit

Communication and Design courses

CD8310 Topics in Cross Cultural Comm

The term cross-cultural competence denotes a vast complex of competencies, which educators, politicians and business leaders around the world have identified as one of the most crucial of the 21st century. The purpose of this course will be to foster such "competence" through a wide-ranging examination of the major social issues that affect communication across national and cultural boundaries.  1 Credit

CD8320 Media Lang: Forms, Approaches

This interdisciplinary course will investigate both common elements (visual and auditory narratives, methods of presentation/distribution, cultural roles) and specific attributes (individual characteristics and technologies) of contemporary media forms. Key developments in the evolution of media types and media languages will be explored in the larger context of understanding critical and theoretical issues associated with these forms and languages.  1 Credit

CD8330 Audiences and the Public

The course addresses the challenges concerning value creation and the effective design and delivery of media/mediated products and services from the perspective of the audience.  The course brings an interdisciplinary conceptual framework to bear on contemporary media and mediated consumption to investigate five principal ways of audiencing (citizen, spectator, customer, user and player) as well as the new audience sociability and several key issues around managing it: metrics, presumption, fans, transmedia, and business models.  1 Credit.

CD8340  Media Writing:  Critical & Narrative Forms

This course will explore issues of form, expression and viewpoint in writing for contemporary visual arts and media. The emphasis will be on essays and critical studies, but writing of summaries, proposals and analyses will also be covered. Traditions of literary and arts criticism form a basis for study of contemporary writing practices for both print and screen-based media. 1 Credit

CD8350  Socially Engaged Media

Bringing together masters students in Social Work and Documentary Media, this research/creation seminar explores socially engaged practices which privilege collaboration and social interaction in an interdisciplinary dialogue. These practices adopt and borrow from such disciplines as pedagogy, theatre, ethnography, anthropology, art and social work. Through praxis we will explore common methodological problems faced by researchers and practitioners in relation to their subjects and communities.  1 Credit.