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Theme 2: Power electronics converters

 Description

The objectives of this project are to 1) develop advanced power converter architectures for ES systems (battery and flywheel systems, etc.) with modular design, bi-directional power flow and embedded fault diagnosis algorithms, and 2) to develop enhanced grid support functions for power system operation (such as anti-islanding, voltage support, real power control, and black start, etc.).

Progress

The project team finished grid support functions of smart inverters for ES systems and completed onboard fault diagnosis algorithms to detect open circuit faults without additional voltage and current sensors. They have also the advanced power converter architectures design. They cooperated with researchers in Project 2.2 to test the digital control system of power converters for ES applications and cooperated with researchers in Project 2.4 to validate the remote control of power converters for ES applications.

Outcomes (cumulative)

6 journal papers, 12 conference papers, 1 patent filed, 6 plenaries, and 1 invited talk.

Project leader

Liuchen Chang, University of New Brunswick

Project collaborators

  • David Xu, Ryerson University
  • Vijay Sood, UOIT
  • Saleh Saleh, University of New Brunswick
  • Bala Venkatesh, Ryerson University

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Guanhong Song (PhD)
  • Shuang Xu (PhD)
  • Katelin Spence (MASc candidate)
  • Zhihao Yu (MASc)
  • Yong Shi (Postdoctoral fellow)

 Description

The objectives of this project are to develop advanced digital control systems for power converters in ES applications, including fully digital control hardware and software; an upper-level energy management controller; and a communication system.

 Progress

The project team is in the process of developing a digital controller based on TI Microcontroller F28069M Launchpad kit for a three-phase inverter and a control system.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

2 journal papers, 5 conference papers, and 3 book chapters.

Project leader

Vijay Sood, UOIT

Project collaborators

  • David Xu, Ryerson University
  • Tariq Iqbal, Memorial University
  • Liuchen Chang, University of New Brunswick

Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Jigneshkumar Patel (PhD)
  • Faizan Khan (MASc)
  • Ahmed Sheir (PhD)

 Description

This project aims to develop supervisory-control and protection strategies and algorithms for 1) heterogeneous storage systems (i.e. battery and flywheel sub-units) and 2) for homogeneous storage systems (i.e. multiple battery storage units). The envisioned development serves as the interface between the utility command signals (Theme 3) and the required ES units’ controls/operation (Projects 2.1 and 2.2), considering requirements of end users (Project 1.5).

Progress

The project team developed an integrated battery and flywheel storage system. A study system for coordinated operation of multiple batteries with multi-microgrids and a microgrid simulation system for the application of battery and flywheel for autonomous microgrids have been established.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

12 journal papers, 10 conference papers, 1 patent filed, 2 patents initiated, 1 book, 6 reports, and 1 invited talk.

 Project leader

Reza Iravani, University of Toronto

Project collaborators

  • Liuchen Chang, University of New Brunswick
  • Vijay Sood, University of Ontario Institute of Technology
  • Amir Yazdani, Ryerson University

Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Arman Ghasemi (PhD)
  • Mostafa Mohsen (PhD)
  • Zhi Zhong (Undergraduate)
  • Rana Hosseini (PhD)
  • Mubark Abdela (MASc)
  • Kamran Akbari (PhD)
  • A Mohamed (PhD)
  • Lisa van Berugal (Undergraduate)
  • Yifan Lu (Undergraduate)
  • Richard Perryman (Undergraduate)
  • Liu Liu (Undergraduate)
  • Armina Khakpour (Undergraduate)
  • Alinaser Erfanian (PhD)
  • Fereria Khan (Undergraduate)
  • Jiao Zhao (Undergraduate)
  • Amin Fariman (PhD)
  • N Sarshar (Undergraduate)

 Description

Research aims to develop an innovative SCADA (supervisory control and data acquisition) interface for smart grids that enables remote control of grid-tied converters for ES, and facilitates control and communication methods.

 Progress

Design of a low-cost SCADA system based on internet of things (IoT) technology has been completed. The project team also demonstrated remote control and data logging of an inverter. A design of a SCADA system based on local open source server was demonstrated. A design has been demonstrated in the lab and it was tested at UNB along with UNB inverter. A SCADA version 2 will be developed in Year 4.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

3 journal papers and 10 conference papers.

Project leader

Tariq Iqbal, Memorial University

 Project collaborators

  • Liuchen Chang, University of New Brunswick
  • Vijay Sood, UOIT
  • Reza Iravani, University of Toronto

Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Lawrence Aghenta (MASc)
  • Amjad Iqbal (MASc)

 Description

A new concept is to repurpose various electric vehicle (EV) batteries by separately connecting them to a multi-channel power converter, which is able to handle various used batteries of differing capabilities. With this project, the principal research objective is to develop a new control strategy to utilize the best EV battery packs depending upon the specific electricity grid service requirements. We use the EV battery variants promoted by worldwide automotive manufacturers. We are including and optimizing grid-storage control for each of four lithium-ion chemistries (LMO, NMC, NCA, LFP), three cell formats (cylindrical, pouch, prismatic), three thermal systems (passive, air, liquid) and operating in both peak-shaving and frequency regulation services. The principal outcome is a new map matrix defining the performance characteristics of the widely varying pack designs, and an optimized controller to coordinate a "mixed battery array".

 Progress

A new "mixed battery array" concept has been developed. Seven battery packs have been acquired and underwent reference case testing, including the use of thermal conditions systems (air and liquid). The batteries were subject to grid storage services of peak-shaving and frequency regulation and their performance was mapped and contrasted at various rates/bids. A performance degradation study of batteries operating in these two services is underway. A "stacked-service" optimized control algorithm for the mixed battery array is presently in development and will be flexible to accommodate the results of the degradation study. HQP at the post-doctoral, PhD, MASc, and UG levels have been trained in research methods, high-voltage battery testing (including standard operating procedures and personal protective equipment), data collection and analysis, and reporting.

 Outcomes (cumulative)

4 journal papers prepped, 3 conference papers, 3 outreach activities, 1 invited talk, and 5 conference discussions.

 Project leader

Lukas Swan, Dalhousie University

 Project collaborators

  • Liuchen Chang, University of New Brunswick
  • Reza Iravani, University of Toronto

 Highly qualified personnel (year 4)

  • Chris White (PhD)
  • Mark Elliott (MASc)