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Frequently asked questions

The University is grateful for the work of the Standing Strong (Mash Koh Wee Kah Pooh Win) Task Force who worked diligently over 10 months (from November 2020 - August 2021) to provide clear recommendations on how the university can move forward and create the next chapter in our history. 

The Task Force’s report has 22 recommendations, including the recommendation for the University to rename the institution. Other recommendations are to share materials to recognize the legacy of Egerton Ryerson, and provide opportunities for learning about Indigenous history and Indigenous and colonial relations, plus much more.

Everyone is encouraged to read the full report.

The University’s Board of Governors has accepted all Task Force recommendations.

One of the recommendations is for the university to develop an action plan by January 31, 2022, to address and implement all of the Task Force’s recommendations. 

An implementation process will be established to ensure that this work is carried out as quickly and transparently as possible.

More information regarding next steps will be available in the coming weeks. 

The decision to change the name of the school was informed by the Standing Strong (Mash Koh Wee Kah Pooh Win) Task Force’s recommendations following their process which included broad community engagement and extensive research.

It is our hope that while this process has been difficult for some, most will recognize it for what it is: the right decision, and an important step forward in our commitment toward reconciliation and in upholding the University’s values and commitments toward Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.

The institution we currently call Ryerson University has had four names since it was founded in 1948 as the Ryerson Institute of Technology. Each name change reflected both the institution’s evolving roles in society and its aspirations for the future. 

This decision is about recognizing the harm caused to community members by the commemoration of Egerton Ryerson. As we work to advance reconciliation and uphold our institutional values, the University can no longer continue honouring our namesake.

The Task Force’s recommendation is that the University undertake a process that engages with community members and university stakeholders to rename the institution.

A framework will be established as to the process and timeline by which we will arrive at a new name for the institution.

More information will be made available on this in the coming weeks.

Our objective is to have a new name announced by the end of this 21/22 academic year. 

For now, we will continue on as “Ryerson University” until a new name can be chosen. However, in recognition of the harm the current university name causes members of our community, the University is taking immediate steps to no longer commemorate Egerton Ryerson, and will post an acknowledgement to the coming name change on our websites and with signage throughout the campus.

The Standing Strong (Mash Koh Wee Kah Pooh Win) Task Force was appointed by president Lachemi in November 2020 to conduct a necessary exploration into both our namesake’s life and legacy and the role of commemoration in our University community.

The Task Force included 14 representatives from Ryerson, other universities and the community with a range of expertise in human rights, history, public art, law and other fields. 

The university’s Joanne Dallaire and Catherine Ellis serve as Co-chairs. 

Joanne is Elder (Ke Shay Hayo) and Senior Advisor Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation for Ryerson University, chair of the Ryerson's Aboriginal Education Council, and co-chair of the Truth and Reconciliation directive.

Catherine is Chair and associate professor in the Department of History at Ryerson University. She recently concluded her term as an elected member of Ryerson University’s Board of Governors. 

The University will establish a framework as to the process and timeline on implementation and will update this site in the coming weeks. Please check back for further details.

The University will establish a framework as to the process and timeline on which we will arrive at a new name for the institution. 

We will provide regular updates to our community on the process, including decisions regarding degrees and certificates. 

Absolutely! Your hard-earned degree remains an accomplishment to celebrate and a credential worthy of promotion. The changing of the name of the unviersity does not change your experience. For the last 73 years, the faculty and staff at the university have worked hard to provide an exceptional educational experience for students. The university's programs and graduates are recognized internationally for their innovative and career-ready approach. Potential employers will continue to recognize your degree for what it says about your skills, training and expertise, regardless of the name change. 

The institution we currently call Ryerson University has had four names since it was founded in 1948 as the Ryerson Institute of Technology. Each name change reflected both the institution's evolving roles in society and its aspirations for the future. 

While the name of the university is changing, your hard work and dedication to your degree will not change. The values and mission of the university remain the same; the renaming is just another step in our history. 

To share comments or questions, please email nextchapter@ryerson.ca

For media inquiries please contact the university's media relations team